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Full text of "The Williams record [microform]"

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52 Elects Duffield President; 
Craiuer, Evans Also Chosen 



Large Turnout 

Records Ballot 

rrhu^Nite 

Second Slate Present 

After Frosh Petition 

Voices Dissatisfaction 



<?r 



Dick Duffield, Paul Cramer, and 
Tom Evans were elected President, 
Vice-President, and Secretary- 
Treasurer, respectively, of the 
Class of 1962, In an election which 
was notable for its spirited cam- 
paicning. A good turnout of a- 
bout one hundred and seventy- 
five members of the flreshinan 
class showed up to cast their votes, 
when the polls opened in Jesup 
Hall Thursday evening. 

The original slate of eight nom^ 
inees which was selected on Feb' 
ruary 25 was held invalid after 
the Undergraduate Council re- 
ceived a petition signed by thirty- 
four men, claiming that there 
had been an insufficient number 
of freshmen present at the nom' 
inating meeting, and that there 
had been evidence of stuffing me 
ballot box. A second meeting was 
held Tuesday evening March 1. at 
which time the following - men 
were nominated: Jack Brody, 
William Callaghan, Edward Chas- 
teney, Cramer, Nuffield, Evans, 
Rudolph Qarfleld. Larry Lewis, 
and Oeorge McAleinan. Although 
it had been originally intended 
that eight nominees would be 
selected, a tie vote necessitated 
adding a ninth man to the ballot. 
DutBeM 

uuffield, Who will repreMit the 
class on the UC, is a graduate of 
Cranford (N. J.) High School. A 
member of Phi Qamma Delta, he 
works on WMS and the News Bu- 
reau, and is on the editorial staff 
of the Record. 

Cramer, who is a member of 
Chi Phi, attended Deerfleld Acad- 
emy. He was .on the freshman 
football team, is captain of fresh- 
man basketball, and is working 
for the Williams Christian Asso- 
Evans 

Evans graduated ttom Oarden 
City (N. Y.) High School. He 
works for WMS and the business 
staff of the AMT. As a memtier 
of the Adel^hic Union he debated 
in the M. I. T. tournament, has 
served as the president of the 
Williams Junior Republicans Club, 
and also as a freshman wrestler. 
Evans is a member of Delta Upsi- 
lon. 



Funders Optimistic 

Over Tardy Pledges 

Only one fifth of the $4024,82 
pledged to the Chest Fund 
Drive was paid up by the orig- 
inal deadline date of March' 1, 
but Chairman Peter Stltes '49 
said that he expected the full 
total would be reached within a 
week or two. 

Ben Farrington '51, treasur- 
er of the drive, attributed the 
delay in returns to the tardy 
circulation of postcards re- 
minding pledge holders that 
their pledges w^re due, and an- 
nounced a new deadline date 
of March 7. 

Over half .-of the $8044.32 
totf^I receipts consists of pledg- 
es. Failure to make good on 
pledges would cripple the Fund 
Drive. Checks should be mailed 
to Ben Farrington, Box 627. 



Ad'lphic Union 
Elects Chiefs 



Pick Jensch, McConnell 
To Debate Englishmen 



Northfield Meeting 
Planned In Week 



Religious Talks Attract 
New England Delegates 

The annual Northfield Student 
Conference is to be held again this 
year at the Northfield Hotel, East 
Northfield, Mass., the weekend of 
March 11-13. This conference will 
be attended by delegates from all 
the colleges in the Connecticut 
Valley area. "*- 

Professor Nels Ferre, Andover- 
Newtoh Theological School, who 
Iftft year did such a challenging 
job at Northfield, will again pre- 
sent the three major addresses. 
The theme of the conference is to 
be "Christian Worship, Its Mean- 
ing and Demands". There will be, 
in addition to the addresses, the 
traditional seminar discussions 
aided by prominent Christian 
leaders of thi!) area, a special Sat- 
urday night program, and ample 
tinu for social activity. 

Hie seven delegates who att- 
ended last year returned greatly 
Impressed after hearing the ad- 
dresses and having the opportu- 
nity to discuss with others reve- 
lant problems facing them today. 
This year WiUiama hopes to have 
an even larger delegation. Any 
interested persons please contact 
Bill HolllBter as soon as possible. 



Following elections last Mon- 
day evening, retiring 'President 
Harry McDaniel announced that 
Leonard Gordon, 'SO,, and Freder- 
rlck Wiseman, '51, had been elec 
ted President and Vice-President 
of the Adelphic Union. 

At the same time it was ann- 
ounced that Charles ' nsch and 
John McConnell were tlie winners 
6f l^st ThtirsdkCy'S tryoutS ^or^thb" 
debate with two English students 
on March 28, on the subject: "RC' 
solved that Marshall Plan aid 
shall cease." 

Also chosen for executive posit' 
tions in the Union as a result of 
the election were Baird Voorhis, 
corresponding secretary; Arnold 
Ijcvin, recording secretary; Brad- 
ley Seager, treasurer; and David 
Fischer, librarian. The Committee 
Chairmen will be appointed by the 
President at the next cabinet 
meeting. 



MusicaVs Title 
Finally Settled 

Moyer, Foisey, Chorus 
Featured In New Hit 



"All that aiitters" is the title 
selected for Stephen Sondhelm's 
new musical which will be presen 
ted at the Adams Memorial Thea' 
tre March 18, 19, 21 and 22. The 
choice of "AU That Qlltters" set 
tied permanently the worrisome 
problem of choosing a title, 
a problem that had 
plagued Sondheim,. '50, Mr David 
Bryant And the Cap and Bells 
Council since Septemlier, Many 
tentative titles ranging from 
"Doillars to IJoughnuts" to "St. 
M^das Dance had been selected, 
but ' the present title will stand, 
The show, is a ntusical adaptation 
of "Beggar on Horseback,'" the 
Oeorge Kaufman and Marc Con- 
nelly play. 

"All That Olltters," unlike the 
"Phinney's Rainbow," last year's 
hit. by Sondheim. lays absolutely 
no emphasis on a Willlamsiana 
locale. Briefly the musical book is 
the story of a poor yotmg compo. 
ser, NetljyicRae, who becomes in- 
volved with an atrociously rich 
mid-Western family, the Cady's. 
Neil dreEims that he marries the 
daughter,' Gladys, known to, her 
family as Qlaad-ies, rather than 
the right girl who lives across the 
hall. The marriage dream se- 
quence comprises two acts of the 
play, with the plot introduction 
and resolvement coming in th« 
prologue and epilogue. 

See MUSICAL. Page 4 



SAC Elects 
Brooks Head 



Stackhouse, Healy 
Also Gain Posts 



St. Michael's Hoopsters 

Top Williams, 63 - 52 



In the annual shakeup of off- 
icers last Tuesday afternoon, 
Schii^r Brooks, '60, emerged as' 
the new President of the Students 
Activities Council, while Edward 
Stackhouse, '50, . "«nd Thomas 
Healy, '50, were electecb-^cretary 
and Treasurer for the en&ulng 
year. "\ 

At the same time John Brlnck- 
erhoff, '51, Leonard Jacob, '50, 
Baird Voorhis, '51, were selected 
to fill posts on the Council's eX' 
ecutive committee, which consists 
of the SAC> officers, three under 
graduate representatives, three 
faculty members, and the UC 
treasurer. 

President Brooks 

By succeeding ■ retiring Presi- 
dent William Barney, Brooks will 
automatically become the SAC re' 
presentative on the UC. A mem,- 
ber of Kappa Alpha Society, be ts 
on the cheer lettding squad, past 
business manager of the Oul, and 
has nm winter and spring track 
for three seasons. 

The new secretary, Ed Stack- 
house, a member of Sigma Phi, 
served on last year's executive 
committee, is present business 
manager of the RECORD, Jittd 
vice-chairman of the Lecture 
Committee. Besides being corbus- 
iness of the Handbook last year 
along with Stackhouse, Tom Hea- 
ly, a member of DU, is a junior 
adviser and an active player on 
both the hockey and baseball 
teams, 
'j ^ Brinckerhoff, Jacob, and y^pr^ 
ills, are nof only members of the 
SAC executive committee, but also 
President of the Flying Club, 
Treasurer of the Lecture Commit- 
tee, and Secretiu^-treasurer of 
the woe, respectively. 




Local Cagers 
Lose Eleventh 
Season Game 



Burzenski Sinks 25 
To Pace Winners, 
Ditmar On With 16 



Eph Captain Jack Mason gets off one of the few good 
shots during Saturday's 63-52 drubbing at the hands M^^|. K 



good Williams 
Hacbeals. 



V 



Fields Tuttle Win Art Prizes 
In Comment Student Contest 



Activities at the Lawrence Mu- 
seimi Tuesday included the award- 
ing of prizes for the Comment- 
sponsored student art contest, a 
lecture by Professor Newhall en- 
titled "The True Confessions of a 
Stamp Collector", and the pre- 
sentation of a gift to the library- 
Top honors in the painting class 
of the student art contest went to 
John Fields, '51, for his water col- 
or, "Still Life". A painting in 
gBtiehe, -'•nme aiwHapBee'V won 
the second prize for Joe Mason, 
'50. The blue ribbon in the sculp- 
ture'and miscellaneous class went 
to a mobile by Bill Tuttle, '51, 
that hung in the center of the 
exhibit room, while a pen and ink 



iVewhall, Sheehan Discuss College, 
Prep School Teaching In First 
Talk Of Vocational Guidance Series 



the college side of teaching, .said 
that prep school was in essence an 
Immediate Job, while college level 
teaching was more of a career into 
which you have to work through 
the graduate school. He said that 
the prospective college professor 
should ask himself three ques- 
tions: "Do you like people?", for 
he will be teaching people, "Do 
you like ideas?", for he will be 
dealing with Ideas all the time,; 
and "Have you ever read a wprk 
of more than one volumej'^f for 
intellectual stamina wlU^be need- 
ed. ^ ;■•'■' 

Proving Givund 

The student at the graduate 
school is in a process of intell- 
ectual self- discipline, and Pro- 
fessor Newhall said that , he is 
learning to know how ideas are 
grasped. The graduate school stu- 
dent gets linguistic tools -r^ for- 
eign languages — for research 
purposes, and literary tools — 
icnowledge of books — for intelli- 
gent reading. » 

Professor Newhall said that at 
the higher levels of graduate work 
the student is required to explore 
on his own some previously unex- 
plored phase of his course of study 
This is a test of intellectual crea- 
tion, and he said that its proper 
completion results in yoiu: satis- 
faction at being the master of a 
thing which you know more about 
than anyone else. 

A college position finally ob- 
tained,' Professor Newhall said 
the contrast with ' prep school 
teaching can be seen to lie in^the 
simpler disciplinary problem, less 
contact with the students, and no 
youn^ worry abbut preparing them for 
inter 



Walter F. Sheehan '33 and His- 
tory Professor Richard A. New- 
hall gave the first in the series 
of vocational guidance tallcs on 
the subject of teaching at the 
prep school and college level last 
Monday evening at Kappa Alpha. 

Mr. Sheehan, Athletic Dhrectur 
at Williams last year and now 
headmaster of the Canterbury 
School, spoke first on the subject 
of prep school teaching. He stres- 
sed the fact that anyone interes- 
ted in teaching at the prep schoid 
level should primarily have an in- 
terest in boys and a desire to help 
them, for the basic aim of the pre- 
paratory school is to prepare a 
boy for college. 

Mr. Sheehan also said that the 
good prep school teacher shoiild 
not only have patience and be "a 
good egg", but that he should alsp 
have the ability to discipline pro- 
perly In order to maintain the res- 
pect of the boys. Since a prep 
school teaching position is a' 
morning, noon and night propo- 
sition, he said that it is not easy 
to study l^or a Ph. D. while at 
school. A better plan is to take a 
year or four summers off and 
work for an M.A., which is all 
that is needed if you desire to 
make prep school teaching, your 
life's work)^ 

Low Start Usnal - 

A salary of $1,500 is the average 
for first year teachers, and Mr. 
Sheehan tulded that the young 
teacher should not expect to have 
the higher grades or N^vanced 
classes to instruct immediately, 
although the smaJl schooU^are 
more Mahle to offer the more «^- 
sponslble positions. The 

teacher's extra-ciu'ricular inter-V^ture study. He said that the re- 
ests In college are generally used yra^ of this profession are the 
to determine his after-class actl- b^i^-ttroducts of an intellectual life 
vlty in the seh(^l. ! shired with mature minds in a 

Professor Newhall, in taking up wont ^ ideas. 



work by Fred Goodrich, '50, was 
runner up. Receiving honorable 
mention were Bill Tuttle, and 
Oeorge Brooks. 

Gages of Temperament 
Professor Newhall discussed his 
stamp collecting coups before 
launching into a study of histor' 
ical lessons learned from stamps. 
These bits of gummed paper are 
useful gages of the temperament 
of governments, indicating their 
choices of commenorative days and 
national heros. Such stamps vary 
from a commeratlon of the tercen- 
tenary of the Coimcil of Trent to 
the tercentenary of volunteer flrC' 
men, from Frederick the Great to 
the founder of Poppy Day. 
. Professor Falson, in behalf of 
President Baxter, received an or- 
iginal etching of Qriffln Hall from 
a representative of the New York 
Central Railroad. This etching, 
one of several pictures of Williams 
on a dlnnlng-car menu of the 
New York Central, is the work of 
Vernon Howe Bailey, well-known 
architectural artist. /' 



Soph Dajme 
Plans JPtotted 



Bill Lawson's Orchestra 
To Play March 19 



Sophomore plans for a pre- 
sprlng college dance on Saturday, 
March 19 became definite Thurs- 
day evening with the announce- 
ment that Bill Lawson's orchestra, 
featuring lovely Barbara Carpen- 
ter as ^vocalist, has been signed 
to play for the affair. 

Lawson's band appeared here 
last spring at the class of 1951's 
successful sequal to the coming 
dance. He also played at the DU 
house during the recent Winter 
Carnival. 

Bennington Baek , 

Spealcing to social tmit repre- 
sentatives at a dance committee 
meeting,. Thursday, class presi- 
dent Bob Oenelsse urged that un- 
dergraduates make plans to at- 
tend the Cap and Bells musical 
"All That Glitters" on either Fri- 
day, Monday, or Tuesday, so that 
they could come to the soph dance 
on Saturday. Because of the MasS' 
achusetts blUe laws, the dance will 
have tp begin and end early, last- 
ing from 8:30 until 12. 

The opening of Bennington 
college, on March 16, the presence 
of heretofore occupied winter ath- 
letes, and the ' possllillity of a 
long weekend, beginning with the 
musical Friday night, will combine 
to make the weekend a good one, 
according to Oeneisse. Plans are 
being made for some soft of en- 
See DANCE, Page 3 



Constantly throwing the ball 
into the stands and opponents' 
hands, the Williams varsity bas- 
ketball team let St. Michael's Col- 
lege "walk away with a 63-52 win 
in a poorly-played game in Lasell 
Gym Wednesday night. This in- 
ept exhibition offered a sharp 
contrast to the Wesleyan game" 
here a week before. 

Bill Hart, a Williamstown boy, 
scored for the visitors on an open- 
ing-tap play, and the Michaelmen 
led all the way except for a few 
seconds in the second half. 
"lat. Michael's had enough height 
to oiiWiine Williams imder the 
hoop, Boti' lArson being the only 
Eph eager to "gather in many re- 
bounds during ttie^ evening. Harry 
Sheehy, tallest man i>b.the squad, 
was sidelined with a sliefht cold. 
Burzenski High Scorer ^^. 

Big Ted Burzenski paced the\ 
victors with 25 points collected 
from all over the floor, and used 
his 6'6" to do a superb job of re- 
bounding, while 5'6" Hart <^n- 
tributed 11 points to the winning 
cause and played a fine floor game 

Oeorge Ditmar, havtog one of' 
his better nights, was high man 
fii- ^Williams with IB, white CHtfiSE"" 
Pusy and Bob Larson added i4 
an3 13 respectively. These three 
men thus accounted for aU but 
nine of the Williams points, as^ 
only one substitute scored. 

St. Michael's has an all-soi5ho- 
more squad, with one exception, 
junior John Dean, jahd should 
make a flne nai^e ' for Itself In 
small-college court circles in the 
next two yotrs. 

Dale Burnett's five blew the ball 
gam^ in the second half, when 
their passing fell apcut and the 
iight St. Mike's defense, a shift- 
ing man-to-man affair, kept them 
from getting off any but the 
See BASKETBATJi, Page 3 



Library Presents 
Medieval Man 



Show Includes Great: 



Works Of Old England 



"The Renaissance Gentleman 
U' England" is ttie subject of a 
special exhibit in the Chapin Li- 
brary, displaying .sixty books 
printed before 1640, representing 
the actual editions read and dis- 
cussed by such famous men of the 
period as Sir Walter Raleigh and 
Sir PhUip Sidney. The exhibit 
also includes a group of Holbein's 
chalk drawings of the genUemen 
of the courts of Henry vm and 
Eltzabeth. 

Books In Exhibit 
The 'Exhibit includes Castig- 
lione's "Courtilfe-", Elyot's "Gov- 
ernor", and Ascham's "Schole- 
master', which were the most 
widely read and influential books 
of the sixteenth century, and the 
seventeenth century liooks, Braito- ~ 
waiie's "English Gentleman" and 
Peacham's "Compleat Gentleman" 
Machiavelli's "Art Of War" and 
other worlu carry instructtons for 
military exercise and other gen- 
tlemanly exercises Including trav- 
el, hunting, fishing, music, and 
angling. 

^e exhibit, prepared by assis- 
tant professor Charles D. Cre- 
means of the History department 
and Mary L. Richmond, custodian 
of the Chapin Library, is open to 
the fdbllc from 9-12 and 2-4 on 
weekdays, and 9-12 on Saturday. 



'V 



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THE VyiLLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1949 



I "Entered os second-class matter November 27, 1944, a^ the post office at 
North Adams, Mossochusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adanris, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the colle^'yeor, Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, WjlMbmstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 y^ . ., Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50^ i, t- ..^ 

Norman S. Wood '50:^ Managing Editors 

Philip S. Collins 'SO News Editor 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 

Waller P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 



Sports Editors 
Senior Associate 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, M. Behre, S. Blosche, K. F. X. Delany, 
J. Gibson, E. Gouinlock. 



Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F.^Reiche, L). Ruder, F. Wiseman, 
R. Hastings. 1952- R. Duftield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, 
E. Schur, W. Widing. 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 _ . 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 Business Manager 

Harry Frazier, III '51 Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 '^ Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Ganyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moir, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evons, W. Hotch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



Volume XLIII 



MARCH 5, 1949 



Number 1 



Action Is The Word 

In leafing through the old RECORD file, the most impi-essi/e 
fact is the frequency with which the same old issues are periodically 
dragged through the editorial columns. The approach to the per- 
ennial headaches — fraternity problems, compulsory chapel, faculty 
adherence to honor system regulations, athletic schedules, and finan- 
cial responsibility for athletic injuries, etc. — seldom vary, simply 
because nothing is ever done about them. Innumerable smaller pro- 
blems have recurrently cropped up and been editorialized on, like- 
wise with nothing done towards their solution. 

This difficulty of removing editorial comment from the realm 
of mere ideas to a region of concrete action seems pertinent at 
this time, when a wholly new editorial board is taking over the 
administration of the RECORD. It seems to us the only problem of 
policy at this time. Issues i scandals if you want to call them that) 
can be dug up aplenty from UC and Gargoyle meetings and the 
old RECORD file. In the ones of greatest interest and widest in- 
cidence, the side to take is usually clear; for in most cases there 
are only two sides — action and lethargy. Our statement of policy 
for the coming year is simply to promote Action — action for what 
we consider to be the benefit of the college and the students. 

There are many problems, of course, where the alternative is 
not between action and lassitude. With them, the editorial func- 
tion is more to point out and to direct discussion into fruitful chan- 
nels than to pretend to be an oracle of the truth. 

The FormuJa 

But to get back to the initial problem of action. What is the 
reaction to such a policy':" Undergraduates are skeptical and say there 
is no hope. For them we present a three-way formula for how to 
get action taken: repetition, placing of responsibility, and coopera- 
tion with other student groups. Repetition gets boring, but it is 
effective. Repetetive "prods", coupled with publicity placing respon- 
sibility for action on a single individal or group of individuals is the 
only antidote for lethargy. The "Why haven't you done this yet 
Mr. So-and-So'.' " technique is objectionable to many 'especially to 
tho.se who get singled out) but it is very eHectivein the few cases 
when it is necessary. Needless to say, bestowing of individual praise 
will take place as "often as individual condemnation. 

Cooperation is essential in two forms; with the UC and SAC, 
the two groups empowered to take definite action on some problems, 
and with WMS, the Alumni Review, and the News Bureau, the 
other organs which disseminate Williams news to undergraduates 
and alumni. Much of our editorial material comes from UC and 
SAC discussion of the problems of student government. Similarly, 
some of the problems on which they must take action are first pre- 
sented in the editorial columns of the RECORD, i.e. the naming 
last week of houseparty dates a year in advance to make possible 
the scheduling of all-home athletic events on those weekends. The 
interests of the college and of the students demand our close coopera- 
tion. 

Action, or at least serious consideration, by the Trustees, Hop- 
kins Hall Athletic Office, faculty, or whatever body is empowered to 
start the ball rolling toward remidial measures in a probelmatlc 
situation also demands the concerted efforts of all those publicity 
organizations in contact with students and alumni. It is only through 
such united effort that the so-called gripe lists can be cut down and 
Williams can be made a smoothly run community. 



f b Mllliipg 3^^«^ The Clipboard 

^ini-tK Art^ms Mn«!«nrhii«;^*t< Willlnm^town. Mo^iachiiSAtta -^ 



JUST A PRANK , . . Last week, at Augustana College in Rock 
Island, 111., four newly-lnltiated fraternity men entered the Women's 
Dorm through the heating plant tunnel at 12;45 a. m. They opened 
the front door and let In 260 comrades, who proceeded to spend the 
next ten minutes tearing the building apart. They cut telephone and 
power lines, turned over beds, emptied drawers, threw girls in the' 
showers, and locked a house mother in her room. The girls retaliated 
with chairs, teeth, and fingernails. When police arrived they heard 
one young lady yelling from an upper story window, "Help! Police! 
isnt this wonderlui'i'" The marauders disappeared into the night and 
no arrests were made, aitnough the cops had received a tip six min- 
utes before the attack. Dean of Men Rev. S. B. Johnson calledithe 
raid a "prank". 

CALLING All cavaliers ... The following item appeased in 
the t'eoruary IS) issue of the Saturday Review of Ijlterature. / 
WIT.l.IAMS COJil.KOE STUDENT, 22, veteran, desires 
job which will take him to Europe for the summer. Travel- 
ing companion; cavalier. Dixon White, Williamstowh, Mass. 
BETTER Late... A book, borrowed from the Middlebury Col- 
lege Library in 1822, was returned last week by the borrower's 
granddaughter. 

THAN NEVER. . .The Gale Hose Co. may not be so bad after ill. 
A truck of the North Adams fire department stalled twice on the 
way 'to a blaze, and finally had to be towed back to the station. 

NAME YOURS. . .A bill requiring that all liquor be labeled with a' 
skull and cross bones and marked "Poison" was introduced recently 
in the Iowa State Legislature. The proposed labels. would also read: 
"Antidote: Pour contents of this bottle in the sewer and place bot- 
tle in ashcan." 

NO MORE FUN. . .The Dekalb County, Georgia, Grand Jury lifls 
announced that school authorities are trying to stop "unwise and 
promiscuous bodily contact between the sexes" in the schools. They 
condemned "so-called petting, boys and girls walking around in 
semi-embrace, holding hands, and such contact as tends to afford 
reactions leading to unwholesome thoughts of immorality." 

STIFLING THE ^ESS. . .The N. Y. State Senate has voted to 
censor comics books/inany of which were termed as "lewd, lascivious, 
and leading to juvenile delinquency." The announcement came as an 
added blow aftei/the news that all girlie magazines had been yanked 
from the newsstands in this part of Massachusetts. 



RECREATION 4 . . . Springfield, that most intcUeclualistic of all 
colleges, has announced a new course entitled Square Dance Calling. 
It is under the jurisdiction of the Recreation and Camping Division 
and is open to all who are not Physical Education majors. Quoting 
fro;n "The Springfield Student," February 25; "Since square danc^ 
calling has become recognized by both professional and lay personnel 
as an important tool for leadership influence, students at Springfield 
may now prepare themselves with those important skills, and will 
also find that they will be in popular demand on many small group 
and larger community occasions." 



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Hunt Analyzes Donne Poetry 
Tudor Philosophy In Lecture 



John Donne, nth century Eng- 
lish poet, was the subject pre- 
sented at Thursdays faculty lec- 
ture by Professor James C. Hunt. 

In order to illustrate his lec- 
ture "What Happens In Donne's 
Poetry " Professor Hunt had pre- 
pared mimeographed copies of the 
Donne poem that he was going 
to analyze. However, as an under- 
standing of such an analysis re- 
quired a knowledge of Renais- 
sance philosophy, Professor Hunt 
first proceeded to "put the speci- 
men in its own element." 



News Briefs 



Congratulations to senior George 
C. Thomason and his wife on the 
birth of a son. 



For the benefit of the college 
basketball fans, station WMS will 
broadcast the Williams-Amherst 
game on Saturday direct from 
Amherst. Head announcer Don 
Vogel will do the reporting. The 
broadcast starts at 7:45 p.m. 



Mr. William P. Dowling of the 
Williams political science depart- 
ment win lecture on "The Case 
Against World Oovernment" on 
Monday, March 7, The Interna- 
tional Relations Club will spon- 
sor the lecture to be given In 
room 3 Orlflln. 



Marine Captain Steve J. aibik 
wlU be on the Williams Campus 



March 3, 21, and 22 to interview 
students who are interested in 
joining the forthcoming Platoon 
Leaders Class program. The Class 
Is an officer candidate program 
designed to prepare selected Col- 
lege students for commissions in 
the US Marine Corps and Re- 
serve. 



Starting on Tuesday evening 
March 8, Lenten services will be 
held in the College Chapel. These 
brief candle light services are 
being sponsored by the WCA. 



Under the auspices of .the Lec- 
ture Committee, and the Philo- 
sophical Union, A. Robert Cam- 
panlgri of the Notre Dame Uni- 
versity philosophy department 
win speak on "The Philosophi- 
cal Problems of History" Tuesday 
evening In 3 QrllBn. 



Medieval Philosophy 

Despite history books, the Re- 
naissance man did not think of 
himself as a neophyte modern. 
To him the Elizabethan Age was 
merely the culmination of the cul- 
tural period founded by the an- 
cient Greeks and Romans. His 
literature expressed medieval phil- 
osophies and concepts. 
To Donne and his contemporaries 
the Ptolemic theory of the uni- 
verse was still the latest accepta- 
ble scientific explanation. Accord- 
ing to Ptolemy, there were tWo 
levels in the universe 
earth, which was gross and un 



stable, and the invisible, which 
was pure and eternal. Medieval 
philosophers expanded Ptolemy's 
two level theory to include man 
He was, they said, the only cre- 
ation of God's to possess the in- 
visible level of rea.son in addition 
to the visibles level of animal 
senses. 



Man A Microcosm 



These philosophers concluded 
not too illogically that man must 
be a microcosm, for his body re- 
presented the visible and mut- 
able level of the cosmos, Mihlle his 
spirit represented the pure and 
eternal invisible level. Man was 
therefore a "window into the na- 
ture of things". Self-examination 
led the way to universal knowledge 
In much of his poetry Donne at- 
tempts to draw rational conclu- 
sions from self-observations and 
thereby throw light on the na- 
ture of the universe. His imagin- 
ative shaping compres.ses and 
fuses "heterogenous .stuff" into 
poetry that is well enough molded 
to raise him to a position of 
the visible I liti^rary leadership in the early 
17th century. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

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DO YOU READ 
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WMS Schedule 

Week of March 6 
Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 

5:00 The AfternoonRoundup The Afternoon Roundup 

''•^° Semi-Classical Music Semi-Classical Music 

8:00 Drama Worlcshop Classical Hour Classical Hour 

8:30 Classical Hour classical Hour 

9:00 News and sports News and Sports 

9:15 Band of the Night Band of the Night 

9:30 Purple Stelnbrenner Semi-Classical McCombe 

Knights Kellog on piano Music 

9:'45 SchaufTler Interviews Seml-dasslcal 



Polk Songs 
10:00 Popular 
Records 

10:30 Campus 
Hit Parade 



Oreat 

Expectations 
Songs by 
iDlck Verney 



Music 

Qllbert and 
Sullivan 

650 Club 



On Piano 

RECORD 
Headlines 

Ferguson 
JaiSK Show 

Coffee Time 
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■7.0,,.. 







THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, AAARCH 5, 1949 



Muirmen Face Unimpressive 

Squad From Am,herst Today; 

f Seek Sixth Win Of Season 



t- 



by Norm Wood 

\ This afternoon at 2 p.m. an 
a.vei'age Amherst swimming team 

I me^ts a stronger, better-balanced 
WlUlfims club In the 38th dual 
clash of the ancient rivals- Al- 
though the Purple has had a 
strong a(Jvantage In recent years 
of this competition, It Is well to 
remember that over the years, 
Amherst has won 18, Williams 16, 
with one stalemate. 

If this relative equality through 
the years Is somewhat sobering, 
the prospects for this afternoon's 
contest are much more encourag- 
ing. On paper, the Royal Purple 
is stronger than last year, and 
according to their record in the 
tank, the Jeff splashers appear 
weaker. 

Record Not Impressive 
Their won-lost tally is not im- 
pressive. They boast victories over 
Tufts, Trinity, Connecticut, and 
Worcester Tech, but have losses 
from MIT, McGlU, and Wesleyan. 
Their times are not exceptional, 
but George Hlller has turned in 
some good races in the breast- 
stroke. Captain Tom Fulton, the 
diver, placed fourth in last year's 
New Englands. 

A purple victory would be the 
fourteenth Little Three crown 
for Williams, — eight for Coach 

\, Muir since his advent to Williams 
in the fall of 1936. It would be the 

^ sixth triumph of the season, and 

!' one further step towards Williams' 
sixth consecutive New Englands 
championship. 

About the same group will an- 
swer the gun for the Purple as in 

' past meets. 

See MUIRMEN, Page 4 



ia^ 



Ephmen To Enter 
KC Meet Tonight 

Barney, Delany, Smith, 
Ziegenhals To Run 

Returning to the mile-relay af- 
ter turning ii\ a fast 8:06.2 two- 
mile relay last week, which was 
good enough to beat Columbia and 
NYU, the winter relay team will 
enter the Knights of Columbus 
meet tonight at Madison Square 
Garden in New York. 

The same quartet of Bill Bar- 
ney, Walt Ziegenhals, Gordy 
Smith and Kev Delany, who tiirn- 
ed in a blazing 1.59.0 half last 
week, will run tonight for the 
Purples. This will probably be the 
team's last race of the season, al- 
though they may enter a meet at 
Cleveland next Saturday. 
3:27.7 Mile 

The team has potentially a win 
ning combination; they have 
turned in a 3:27.7 mile this year 
at the AAU meet. It is four weeks 
since they have run the mile 
however, and this lay-off may 
put them off their best form. 

The K. of C. meet is the last 
major meet of the winter season 
in New York. It will mark the 
last appearance of several of the 
European stars who have beenrun- 
nlng in this country this winter. 



Eph Matmen 
Face Amherst 
In Last Meet 



Lord Jeffs Challenge 
Undefeated Record; 
Frosh Face Amherst 



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At 3:30 in the Lasell Gym this 
afternoon, the Williams matmen 
encounter Amherst with a Little 
Three title at stake in both the 
varsity and freshman matches. 
Undefeated in five matches, Coach 
Bullock's men will face strong 
opposition in this last dual meet 
of the season. 

Although again a favorite by 
comparative scores, the purple 
was also rated top last year be- 
fore Jeffs outfought a house-party 
ridden squad for a 14-13 upset. 
By profiting from experience the 
Ephs should have a better chance 
today. 

Roush, Keith Threaten 
Amherst has downed MIT and 
Wesleyan, the latter by a 21-8 
count, while losing to Brown 17-9 
— a team the Ephs bagged 21-12 
Undoubtedly the strong point of 
their team are the Co-captains 
Sandy Keith and Jim Roush at 
165 and 175 lbs. Dave Rowland at 
136 and Bob Dewey at 155 lbs., 
both veterans of last year, might 
also spell trouble for the varsity 
squad. 

The rest of the line-up shows 
about equal strength. Bill Kelton 
will start at 121 lbs. against Char- 
lie Taft. who has a good record 
of wins to date. Captain Paul 
Cook's opponent will be Beebe 
at 128 lbs. 

Scrubby Perry takes on Row- 
land in the next event while Paul 
Shorb, at 145 lbs. sljould meet 



Amherst Cops 
Squash Crown 

Sabrinas Topple Ephs 
In 5-4 Encounter 



Coach Clarence ChaSee's Wil- 
liams squash squad dropped a 
disappointing 5-4 match to a 
strong Amherst team on the Dav- 
enport Courts at Amherst last 
Wednesday. In falling before the 
Sabrinas, the Purple relinquished 
the Little Three crown, which 
they had held since 1942. 

Close victories in the top four 
positions, coupled with Martin's 
win in the number six slot, pro- 
vided the margin of victory for 
the Lord Jeffs. Rich Allen, playing 
in his usual number one position. 
See SQUASH, Page 4 



Rileys, Harrison Lead Green 
To Victory Over Ephmen 10-1 



either Charlie Chapin or Weeks. 
Green Carleton faces Dewey at 
155 lbs. 

Bill Leitzinger then meets 
Keith in what should be one of 
the meets best fights, Pete Smythe 
draws Roush at 176 lbs. and John 
Stillwell encounters McGrath in 
the heavyweight slot. 

Freshman Toss-up 

The Freshman match, to be run 
simultaneously, is a toss-up. 'While 
the Williams cubs edged Wesley- 
an 18-16, Amherst took them 23- 
10; yet against Mt. Hermon Am- 
herst lost 21-11 and Williams won 
23-13. Again the Eph yearlings 
will bank "on their heavyweight 
strength. 

The cub line-up should stand: 
Aaron Katcher, Fred Pew, Fred 
Toppan, and Tom Evans for the 
first four bouts. Bill Callaghan, 
Dick Edwards, Jim Shanahan, and 
Jack Ordeman fill out the &&m 
in the heavyweight slots. 



Snowless Ski Team 
Scratches Last Meet 

The ski-team, handicapped 
by a lack of snow for the last 
two months, will scratch from 
their last scheduled meet of 
the season, the Harvard Giant 
Slalom at Manchester. Ver- 
mont this weekend. 

Lack of snow has been the 
team's big headache all season; 
the climax of this being the 
cancellation of the Williams 
Winter Carnival meet. They 
have had very few days of 
skiing here in Williamstown; 
the recent snow fall has seen 
much activity on Sheep rtill 
this past week, but it arrived 
too late. 



ReynoldsNetsLone 
Goal For Sextet 







Luckies' fine tobacco picks you 
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Basketball - • - 

weirdest of shots for some time. 
Visitors Crack Zone 

After scoring on the opening 
play of the game, the visitors 
chalked up five more ba.skets be- 
fore Williams scored from the 
floor with the count 12-3 against 
them. The home five had used a 
zone defense up to this point, but 
gave it up as a bad job after five 
minutes of play, reverting to the 
usual man-for-man style. 

Pusey, Ditmar, and Larson scor- 
ed for the Ephmen to make it 
12-10 before Hart hit with a one- 
hander for the visitors, and field 
goals by Larson and Ditmar tied 
it up at 15-15 until Hart .swished 
with a long set. 

Bud Cool's one-hand shot made 
it 17-17 again, but Burzenski then 
assumed control for the rest of 
the hall, tossing in two one-hand 
sets and a tap for a five-point 
lead. Pusey meanwhile scored with 
a pair of pretty shots, ahd Hart 
and Ditmar traded jumj shots to 
and Ditmar traded jump shots to 

Williams In Front 

Three points by Dewey Pager- 
burg put Williams out in front 
32-31 early in the second stanza, 
but Burzenski's set from the cor- 
ner gave the visitors a permanent 
lead, to which they added stead- 
ily for seven minutes. Three hoops 
by Ed Krupinski helped to give 
the leaders a 52-41 advantage 
with 8 minutes left to play. 

Williams held the Saints to an 
even break for the rest of the 
game, but that was all they could 
do. Shots by Kruse and Burzenski 
now stretched the margin to 17 
points, 59-42. 

Larson then tallied for the Eph- 
men on a rebound and a one- 
hander from the circle, but foul- 
ed out with the count still 59-48 
and Captain Jack Mason Joinei 
him in the showers a minuti 
later. 

Pusey then hit twice from the 
foul line and Ditmar swished with 
a long set shot, but it obviously 
was in a lost cause. Pinal score: 
St. Michael's 63. Williams 52. 

It was the eleventh loss for the 
home cagers in eighteen starts 
this season. 



Sparked by their first line of 
the aging Riley Brothers, Bill and 
Joe, centered by sophomore Cliff 
Harrison, the Big, Old Green of 
Dartmouth thumped the Williams 
sextet 10-1 Wednesday night at 
Hanover. 

Dartmouth jumped to a first 
period lead of five goals, but in 
the last two frames, the Williams 
defense settled down, while the 
Eph forwards capitalized on a 
Dartmouth penalty and spoiled 
Captain Dick Desmond's shut-out 
In the last period, both teams 
were playing all out as though the 
score were tied, and the crowd was 
wild. 

The Riley line accounted for 
thi-ec of the Dartmouth first per- 
iod Hoals, with Arnie Oss and 
Crowley each adding one. Crowley 
contributed one in the next period, 
while Joe Riley and Harrison both 
scored one. The Ephmen garner- 
ed their only goal of the game in 
this period when Mark Reynolds 
slapped Don Ratcliffe's shot past 
Desmond at 14:40. 

llouKh Play 
The Ephmen because of lack of 
practice, had trouble throughout 
the game with the Green skaters 
who were extremely fast, and were 
around the Williams cage like 
hornets. But in the third period. 
the Williams defense, who were 
superior checkers, began to reply 
to Dartmouth's rough play. 
Two thundering body ciiecks 
by George Owen arounsed the ire 
of the partisan crowd, and the 
game reached a fever pitch when 
Joe Riley was ejected from the 
game for punching Goalie Dave 
Pynchon. 

This same wound up the .seas- 
on for the Ephs who were forced 
to do all their practicing in games 
due to the poor ice conditions at 
home. They won five games, and 
lost nine, four of these games to 
Ivy League competition. In the 
past two weeks, they enjoyed one 
formal practice, while playing 
three games. Doug Coleman was 
high scorer for the season with 
nineteen points. Co-captain Tom 
Ben.son and Mark Reynolds tied 
for .second place with seventeen 
apiece. Bucky Marchese followed 
close behind with fifteen. This 
was the la.st game for four of the 
Purple sextet. Co-captains Charlie 
Huntington and Benson, Wilbur 
Swan, and Ronnie Chute. The rest 
of the team will be returning next 
year, and given .some ice, should 
prove to be one of the best teams 
in the history of the college. 



Dance 



tertalnment on Saturday after- 
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couple al^ $1 per stag. 



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THIS TIME OF YEAR IS 

BOCH BEER TIME 

If you hove never tried it, now is the time, 
Drop in and let us tell you about it. 

KING'S 

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Open until 11:00 P.M. 



■ - ; ■,,'*■ 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1949 



irtrc Williji^^ 3gU£(rf^ 



KInrth AMnm% Mn^snr^tK^**^ 



WIMInmttown. MouochuMttt 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Uomb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
- Wednesdoy ond Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williomstown, Telephone 72, 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 > Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 .'. , - ... 

Norman S. Wood '50 ., Monoging Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 .,...."..1 " News Editor 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 ' c l cj.*« 

Walter P. Stern '50 SP°''^ "'•°'^= 

William R. Barney '49 , Senior Associate 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, M. Behre, S. Blosche, K. F. X.' Delony, 
J. Gibson, E. Gouinlock. 

Editorioi Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, F. Wiseman, 
R. Hastings. 1952- R. Dutfield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickord, 
E. Schur, W. Widing. 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 _ . ,, 

Edward L. Stackhous^'50 Business Manager 

Harry Frozier, III '51 Advertising Managei 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 Ass't Advertising Monager 

Edward C. Stebbins'51 Circulation' Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 Treosurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. JGonyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moir, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 




Volume XLIII 



MARCH 5, 1949 



Number 1 



Action Is The Word 

In leafing through the old RECORD file, the most impressl/e 
tact is the frequency with which the same old issues are periodically 
dragged through the editorial columns. The approach .to the per 
enriial headaches — fraternity problems, compulsory clvapel, faculty 
adherence to honor system regulations, athletic schedules, and finan- 
cial responsibility for athletic injuries, etc. — seldom vary, simply 
because nothing is ever done about them. Innumerable smaller pro- 
blems have recurrently cropped up and been editorialized on, like- 
wise with nothing done towards their solution. 

This difficulty of removing editorial comment from the realm 
of mere ideas to a region of concrete action seems pertinent at 
this time, when a wholly new editorial board is taking over the 
administration of the RECORD. It seems to us the only problem of 
policy at this time. Issues (scandals if you want to call them that) 
can be dug up aplenty from UC and Gargoyle meetings and the 
old RECORD file. In the ones of greatest interest and widest in- 
cidence, the side to take is usually clear; for in most cases there 
are only two sides — action and lethargy. Our statement of policy 
for the coming year is simply to promote Action — action for what 
we consider to be the benefit of the college and the students. 

There are many problems, of course, where the alternative is 
nflt between action and lassitude. With them, the editorial func- 
tion Is more to point out and to direct discussion into fruitful chan- 
nels than to pretend to be an oracle of the truth. 

The Formula 

But to get back to the initial problem of action. What is the 
reaction to such a policy? Undergraduates are skeptical and say there 
is no hope. For them we present a three-way formula for how to 
get action taken: repetition, placing of responsibility, and coopera- 
tion with .other student groups. Repetition gets boring, but it is 
effective. Repetetive "prods", coupled with publicity placing respon- 
sibility for action on a single individal or group of individuals is the 
only antidote for lethargy. The "Why haven't you done this yet 
Mr. So-and-So'.'" technique is objectionable to many lespeclally to 
those who get singled out) but it is very eflectivein the few cases 
when it is necessary. Needless to say, bestowing of individual praise 
will take place as often as individual condemnation. 

Cooperation is essential in two forms: with the UC and SAC, 
the two groups empowered to take definite action on some problems, 
and with WMS, the Alumni Review, and the News Bureau, the 
other organs which disseminate Williams news to undergraduates 
and alumni. Much of our editorial material comes from UC and 
SAC discussion of the problems of student government. Similarly, 
some of the problems on which they must take action are first pre- 
sented in the editorial columns of the RECORD, i.e. the naming 
last week of houseparty dates a year in advance to make possible 
the scheduling of all-home athletic events on those weekends. The 
interests of the college and of the students demand our close coopera- 
tion. 

Action, or at least serious consideration, by the Trustees, Hop- 
kins Hall Athletic Office, faculty, or whatever body is empowered to 
start the ball rolling toward remidial measures in a probelmatic 
situation also demands the concerted efforts of all those publicity 
organizations in contact with students and alumni. It Is only through 
such united effort that the so-called gripe lists can be cut down and 
Williams can be made a smoothly run community. 



JUST A PRANK... Last Week, at Augustana College in Rock 
Island, 111., four newly- Initiated fraternity men entered the Womb's 
Dorm through the heating plant tunnel at 12:46 a. m. They opened 
the front door and let in 250 comrades, who proceeded to spend the 
next ten minutes tearing the building apart. They cut telephone and 
power lines, turned over beds, emptied drawers, threw girls In the' 
showers, and lobked a house mother in her room. The girls retaliated 
with chairs, teeth, and fingernails. When police arrived they heard 
one young lady yelling from an upper story window, "Help! Police! 
fsn t this wonderful'/" The marauders disappeared into the night and 
no arrests were made, aipnough the cops had retxlved a tip six min- 
utes before the aaeMfr.Dean of Men Rev. S, B. Johnson called the 
raid a "prank". 

CALLING ./(LL CAVAUERS...The following item appeared in 
the t'eoruary IS) issue of the Saturday Review of Literature. 

, WILLIAMS COLUSQE STUDENT, 22, veteran, desires 

' job which will take him to Europe for the summer. Travel- 
ing companion; cavalier. Dixon White, Willlamstown, Mass. 
BETTER LATE... A book, borrowed from the Mlddlebury Col- 
lege Library in 1822, was returned last week by the borrower's 
granddaughter. 

THAN NEVER. . .The Qale Hose Co. may not be so bad after all. 
A truck of the North Adams fire department stalled twice on the 
way to a blaze, and finally had to be towed back to the station. 

NAME YOURS. . .A bill requiring that all liquor be labeled with a 
skull and cross bones and marked "Poison" was introduced recently 
in the Iowa State Legislature. The proposed labels would also read; 
■Antidote: Pour contents of this bottle in the sewer and place bot- 
tle in ashcan." 

NO MORE FUN. . .The Dekalb County, Georgia, Grand Jury has 
announced that school authorities are trying to stop "unwise and 
promiscuous bodily contact between the sexes" in the schools. They 
condemned "so-called petting, boys and girls walking around in 
semi-embrace, holding hands, and such contact as tends to afford 
reactions leading to unwholesome thoughts of immorality. " 

STIFLING THE PRESS. . .The N. Y. State Senate has voted to 
censor comics books, many of which were termed as "lewd, lascivious, 
and leading to juvenile delinquency." The annoimcement came as an 
added blow after the news that all girlie magazines had been yanked 
from the newsstands in this part of Massachusetts. '^ 

RECREATION 4. . .Springfield, that most intellectualistic of all 
colleges, has announced a new course entitled Square Dance Calling. 
It is under the jurisdiction of the Recreation and Camping Division 
and is open to all who are not Physical Education majors. Quoting 
from "The Springfield Student," February 25: "Since square dance 
calling has befcome recognized by both professional and lay personnel 
as an important tool for leadership influence, students at Springfield 
may now prepare themselves with those important skills, and will 
also find that they will be in popular demand on many small group 
and larger community occasions." 



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EXPERT, DEPENDABLE MECHANICS 

AUTHORIZED PARTS 

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Hunt Analyzes Donne Poetry 
Tudor Philosophy In Lecture 



News Briefs 



o- 



Congratulations to senior George 
C. Thomason and his wife on the 
birth of a son. 



For the benefit of the college 
basketball fans, station WMS will 
.broadcast the Williams-Amherst 
game On Saturday direct from 
Amherst. Head announcer Don 
Vogel will do the reporting. The 
broadcast starts at 7:45 p.m. 



Mr. William F. DowUng of the 
Williams political science depart- 
ment win lecture on "The Case 
Against World Oovemment" on 
Monday, March 7, The Interna- 
tional Relations Club will spon- 
sor the lecture to be given in 
room 3 Orlffln. 



Under the ajusplces of the Lec- 
ture Committee, and the Philo- 
sophical Union, A. Robert Cam- 
panlgri of the Notre Dame Uni- 
versity philosophy department 
will speak on "The Phllosophi- 
Marlne Citptaln Steve^J. Qlbik I cal Problems of History" Tuesday 
wlU be on the WlUtama Oampus I evening In 3 arlffln.. 



March 3, 21, and 22 to Interview 
students who are Interested In 
joining the forthcoming Platoon 
liCaders Class program. The Class 
is an officer candidate program 
designed to prepare selected Col- 
lege students for commissions in 
the US Marine Corps and Re- 
serve. 



Starting on Tuesday evening 
March 8, Lenten services will be 
held In the College Chapel. These 
brief candle light services are 
being sponsored by the WCA. 



John Donne, nth century Eng- 
lish poet, was the subject pre- 
sented at Thursday's faculty lec- 
ture by Professor James C. Hunt. 

In order to illustrate his lec- 
ture "What Happens In Donne's 
Poetry" Professor Hunt had pre- 
pared mimeographed copies of the 
Donne poem that he was going 
to analyze. However, as an under- 
standing of such an analysis re- 
quired a knowledge of Renais- 
sance philosophy. Professor Hunt 
first proceeded to "put the speci- 
men in its own element." 

Medieval Philosophy 

Despite history books, the Re- 
naissance man did not think of 
himself as a neophyte modern. 
To him the Elizabethan Age was 
merely the culmination of the cul- 
tural period foimded by the an- 
cient Greeks and Romans. His 
literature expressed medieval phil- 
osophies and concepts. 
To Donne and his contemporaries 
the Ptolemic theory of the uni- 
verse was still the latest accepta- 
ble scientific explanation. Accord- 
ing to Ptolemy, there were two 
levels in the universe; the visible 
earth, which was gross and un- 



stable, and the invisible, which 
was pure and eternal. Medieval 
philosophers expanded Ptolemy's 
two level theory to include man. 
He was, they said, the only cre- 
ation of God's to possess the in- 
visible level of reason in addition 
to the visible level of animal 
senses. 

Man A Microcosm 

These philosophers concluded 
not too iUoglcally that man must 
be a microcosm, for his body re- 
presented the visible and mut- 
able level of the cosmos, while his 
spirit represented the pure and 
eternal invisible level. Man was 
therefore a "windoW into the na- 
ture of things". Self-examination 
led the way to universal knowledge 
In much of his poetry Donne at- 
tempts to draw rational conclu- 
sions from self-observations and 
thereby throw light on the na- 
ture of the universe. His imagin- 
ative shaping compresses and 
fuses "heterogenous stuff" into 
poetry that is well enough molded 
to raise him to a position of 
literary leadership in the early 
17th century. 



WMS Schedule 

I 

Week of JVfarcli 6 
Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 

5:00 The AfternoonRoundUp The Afternoon Roundup 

''•^° Semi-Classical Music Semi-Classical Music 

8:00 Drama Workshop Classical floui Classical" Hour 

8:30 Classical Hour ' Classical Hour , " 

00 News and Sports ' News and Sports 

9:15 Band of the Night Band of the Night 

9:30 Purple Steinbr*nner Seml-CTassical McCombe 

Knights Kellog on piano Music 

9:45 Schauffler Interviews Semi-Classical 



Folk Songs 
10:00 Popular 
Records 

10:30 Campus 
Hit Parade 



Music 



On Piano 

RECORD 
Headlines 



Great 

Expectations 
Songs by 
Dick Vemey 



■\ 



^OUbert and 
Sullivan 

650 Club 



Ferguson 
Jazz Show 

Coffee Time 
At Mikes 



RELIABLE SERVICE 

Join our Hit of Regular 
Williomi Cuilomort ot . . 

KRONICK'S 
Esso Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
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1- Our Uncle 

2- JATO 

3- Bantam Ben 

4- Boch 

5- "Advance" 

6- A men's college 

7- "Open House" 
8 "Snow Corner" 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1949 



Miurmp.n Face 



■^/4 



Y 



Unimpressive 
today; 
)eason 



t 



t./3, 2^2-37 



To Enter 
Tonight 



remember that oyer the years, 
Amherst has won 18, Williams 16, 
with one stalemate. 

If this relative equality through 
the years Is somewhat sobering, 
the prospects for this afternoon's 
contest are much more encourag- 
ing. On paper, the Royal Purple 
Is stronger than last year, and 
according to their record in the 
tank, the Jeff splashers appear 
weaker. 

Record Not Impressive 

Their won-lost tally Is not im- 
pressive. They boast victories over 
Tufts. Trinity, Connecticut, and 
Worcester Tech, but have losses 
from MIT, McQlll, and Wesleyan. 
Their times are not exceptional, 
but George Hiller has turned In 
some good races in the breast- 
stroke. Captain Tom Pulton, the 
diver, placed fourth in last year's 
New Englands. 

A purple victory would be the 
fourteenth Little Three crown 
for Williams, — eight for Coach 
Mulr since his advent to Williams 
in the fall of 1936. It would be the 
sixth triumph of the season, and 
one further step towards Williams' 
sixth consecutive New Englands 
championship. 

About the same group will an- 
swer the gun for the Purple as in 
past meets. 

See MUIRMEN, Page 4 



ny, Smith, 
8 To Run 



Eph Matmefi 
Face Amherst 
In Last Meet 



Lord Jeffs Challenge 
Undefeated Record; 
Frosh Face Amherst 



1 16 mile-relay af- 
ter turning in a fast 8:05.2 two- 
mile relay last week, which was 
good enough to beat Columbia and 
NYU, the winter relay team will 
enter the Knights of Columbus 
meet tonight at Madison Square 
Garden In New York. 

The same qtiartet of Bill Bar- 
ney, Walt Zlegenhals, Oordy 
Smith and Kev Delany, who turn- 
ed In a blazing 1.69.0 half last 
week, will run . tonight for. the 
Purples. This will probably be the 
team's last race of the season, al- 
though they may ettt^ a meet at 
Cleveland next Saturday. 
3:27.7 MUe 

The team has potentially a win- 
ning combination; they have 
turned in a 3:27.7 mile this year 
at the AAU meet. It is four weeks 
since they have run the mile 
however, and this lay-off may 
put them off their best form. 

The K. of C. meet is the last 
major meet of the winter season 
in New York. It will mark the 
last appearance of several of the 
European stars who have beenrun- 
nlng in this country this winter. 



ROSASCO'S TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

Air - Rill - Bui - Stcinuhip 

TEL. 399 

90 Main Street North Adimi 



At 3:30 in the Lasell Gym this 
afternoon, the Williams matmen 
encounter Amherst with a Uttle 
Three title at stake In both the 
varsity and freshman matches. 
Undefeated in five matches. Coach 
Bullock's men will face strong 
opp6sltlon In this last dual meet 
of the season. 

Although again a favorite by 
comparative scores, the purple 
was also rated top last year be- 
fore Jeffs outfought a house-party 
ridden squad for a 14-13 upset. 
By profiting from experience the 
Ephs should have a better chance 
today. 

Roush, Keith Threaten 
Amherst has downed MIT and 
Wesleyan, the latter by a 21-8 
count, while losing to Brown 17-9 
— a team the Ephs bagged 21-12. 
Undoubtedly the strong point of 
their team are the Co-captains 
Sandy Keith and Jim Roush at 
165 and 175 lbs. Dave Rowland at 
136 and Bob Dewey at 155 lbs., 
both veterans of last year, might 
also spell trouble for the varsity 
squad. 

The rest of the line-up shows 
about equal strength. Bill Kelton 
will start at 121 lbs. against Char- 
lie Taft, who has a good record 
of wins to date. Captain Paul 
Cook's opponent will be Beebe 
at 128 lbs. 

Scrubby Perry takes on Row- 
land in the next event while Paul 
Shorb, at 145 lbs. shoifld meet 



Amherst Cops 
Squash Crown 

Sabrinas Topple Ephs 
In 5-4 Encounter 



Coach Clarence Chaffee's Wil- 
liams squash squad dropped a 
disappointing 5-4 match to a 
strong Amherst team on the Dav- 
enport Courts at Amherst last 
Wednesday. In falling before the 
Sabrinas, the Purple relinquished 
the Little Three crown, which 
they had held since 1942. 

Close victories In the top four 
positions, coupled wltl\ Martin's 
win In the number six slot, pro- 
vided the margin of victory for 
the Lord Jeffs. Rich Allen, playing 
in his usual number one position, 
See SQUASH, Page 4 



Rileys, Harrison Lead Green 
To Victory Over Ephmen 10-1 



either Charlie Chapin or Weeks. 
Green Carleton faces Dewey at 
155 lbs. 

Bill Leltzinger then meets 
Keith in what should be one of 
the meets best fights, Pete Smythe 
draws Roush at 175 lbs. and John 
Stillwell encounters McGrath in 
the heavyweight slot. 

Freshman Toss-up 

The Freshman match, to be run 
simultaneously, is a toss-up. While 
the Williams cubs edged Wesley- 
an 18-16, Amherst took them 23- 
10; yet against Mt. Hermon Am- 
herst lost 21-11 and Williams won 
23-13. Again the Eph yearlings 
will bank on their heavyweight 
strength. 

The cub line-up should stand: 
Aaron Katcher, Fred Pew, Fred 
Toppan, and Tom Evans for the 
first four bouts. Bill Callaghan, 
Dick Edwards, Jim Shanahan, and 
Jack Ordeman fill out the team 
in the heavyweight slots. 



Snowless Ski Team 
Scratches Last Meet 

The ski-team, handicapped 
by a lack of snow for the last 
two months, will scratch from 
their last scheduled meet of 
the season, the Harvard Giant 
Slalom at Manchester, Ver- 
mont this weekend. 

Lack of snow has been the 
team's big headache all season; 
the climax of this being the 
cancellation of the Williams 
Winter Carnival meet. They 
have had very few days of 
skiing here in Williamstown; 
the recent snow fall has seen 
much activity on Sheep Hill 
this past week, but it arrived 
too late. 







Rey nolds Nets Lone 
Goal For Sextet 



Basketball - • - 

weirdest of shots for some time. 
Visitors Cracl( Zone 

After scoring on the opening 
play of the game, the visitors 
chalked up five more baskets be- 
fore Williams scored from the 
floor with the count 12-3 against 
them. The home five had used a 
zone defense up to this point, but 
gave it up as a bad job after five 
minutes of play, reverting to the 
usual man-for-man style. 

Pusey, Ditmar, and Larson scor- 
ed for the Ephmen to make it 
12-10 before Hart hit with a one- 
hander for the visitors, and field 
goals by Larson and Ditmar tied 
it up at 15-15 until Hart swished 
with a long set. 

Bud Cool's one-hand shot made 
it 17-17 again, but Bui-zenski then 
assumed control for the rest of 
the half, tossing in two one-hand 
sets and a tap for a five-point 
lead. Pusey meanwhile scored with 
a pair of pretty shots, and Hart 
and Ditmar traded jumj shots to 
and Ditmar traded Jump shots to 

Williams In Front 



Luckies' fine tobacco picks you 
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Three points by Dewey Fager- 
burg put Williams out in front 
32-31 early in the second stanza, 
but Burzenski's set from the cor- 
ner gave the visitors a permanent 
lead, to which they added stead- 
ily for seven minutes. Three hoops 
by Ed Krupinski helped to give 
the leaders a 52-41 advantage 
with 8 minutes left to play. 

Williams held the Saints to an 
even break for the rest of the 
game, but that was all they could 
do. Shots by Kruse and Burzenski 
now stretched the margin to 17 
points, 59-42. 

Larson then tallied for the Eph- 
men on a rebound and a one- 
hander from the circle, but foul- 
ed out with the count still 59-48, 
and Captain Jack Mason Joined 
him in the showers a minute 
later. 

Pusey then hit twice from the 
foul line and Ditmar swished with 
a long set shot, but it obviously 
was in a lost cause. Pinjl score: 
St. Michael's 63, Williams 52. 

It was the eleventh loss for the 
home cagers in eighteen starts 
this season. 



Sparked by their first line of 
the aging Riley Brothers, Bill and 
Joe, centered by sophomore Cliff 
Harrison, the Big, Old Green of 
Dartmouth thumped the Williams 
sextet 10-1 Wednesday night at 
Hanover. 

Dartmouth Jumped to a first 
period lead of five goals, but In 
the last two frames, the-WllUams 
defense settled down, while the 
Eph forwards capitalized on a 
Dartmouth penalty and spoilegl 
Captain Dick Desmond's shut-out 
In the last period, both teams 
were playing all out as though the 
score were tied, and the crowd was 
wild. 

The Riley line accounted for 
three of the Dartmouth first per- 
iod goals, with Arnie Oss and 
Crowley each adding one. Crowley 
contributed one in the next period, 
while Joe Riley and Harrison both 
scored one. The Ephmen garner- 
ed their only goal of the game in 
this period when Mark Reynolds 
slapped Don Ratcliffe's .shot past 
Desmond at 14:40. 

Roueh Play 
Tlie Ephmen because of lack of 
practice, had trouble throughout 
the game with the Green skaters 
who were extremely fast, and were 
around the Williams cage like 
hornets. But in the third period, 
the Williams defense, who frere 
superior checkers, began to t^^ply 
to Dartmouth's rough play. 
Two thundering body checks • 
by George Owen arounsed the ire 
of the partisan crowd, and , the 
game reached a fever pitch when 
Joe Riley was ejected from the 
game for punching Goalie Dave 
Pynchon. 

This game wound up the seas- 
on f Jr the Ephs who were forced 
to do all their practicing in games 
due to the poor ice conditions at 
home. They won five games, and 
lost nine, four of these games to 
Ivy League competition. In the 
past two weeks, they enjoyed one 
formal practice, while playing 
three games. Doug Coleman was 
high scorer for the season with 
nineteen points. Co-captain Tom 
Benson and Mark Reynolds tied 
for second place with seventeen 
apiece. Bucky Marchese followed 
close behind with fifteen. This 
was the last game for four of the 
Purple sextet, Co-captains Charlie 
Huntington and Benson, Wilbur 
Swan, and Ronnie Chute. The rest 
of the team will be returning next 
year, and given some ice, should 
prove to be one of the best teams 
in the history of the college. 



Dance - 



tertalnment on Saturday after 
noon. Admission charge to the 
dance will be only $1.50 per 
couple and $1 per stag. 



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Frequent metropoliton trains, busses. 
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PACKAGE STORE 



Open until 11:00 P.M. 



i^M^iL..: 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1949 



Languages Vital 
Say Root, Stocking 

Emphasizes Position In 
Liberal Arts Education 



Chapman Of Arabian American Oil 
To Gush In Sec6nd Of Job Series 



-Both English and foreign languag- 
es help to acquaint students with 
the world In which they live, a- 
greed Professors Winthrop H. Root 
Professor of Germain and Fred H. 
Stocking, Assistant Professor of 
English. In a discussion of the 
reldtive positions of these two sub- 
jects in a liberal arts cyrrlculum 
at the fifth in a series of six fresh- 
man orientation programs, in Je- 
sup Hall March 1 at 7:30. 

"Languages are the step-child- 
ren of today, the forgotten Cln- 
derellas," claimed Dr. Root. "And 
yet, all achievements in politics, 
economics, and history are based 
on a knowledge of language 
Someday," he predicted, "lan- 
guages will be princes." 

Purpose of English 

Since a liberal arts education 
will determine "what kind of guy 
you turn out to be," Dr. Stock- 
ing reasoned, a study of English 
is necessary to "help you become 
a unique and significant indlvi 
dual, and to enjoy life." He 
pointed out that, although Eng 
lish will not make one a good 
businessman, it can "acquaint you 
with the internal and private pro- 
blems of men". 

A language, in turn, said Dr 
Root, gives the benefit of a for- 
eign literature. Thus, it "teaches 
us to understand the French and 
Germans," something vital in to- 
day's world. In addition, the Eng- 
lish language means more after a 
study of derivations and grammar 
At the same time, "we have an 
aesthetic, artistic approach." 

Both instructors outlined the 

requirements for a major. Each 

called attention to the need for 

■ such courses in graduate school 

requirements- 



WMS Schedule - - 

Friday 

5:00 The Afternoon Roundup 
7:30 Semi-Classical Music 
8:00 Classical Hour 
9:00 News and Sports 
9:30 Old Chuck Wagon 
10:00 Semi-Classical Music 
10:30 An Hour of "Mostly For 
Dreaming" 

Saturday 
5:30-630 Williams Inn Show 
Music and Interviews 



D- 



As the second In the Spring 
series of vocational guidance 
speakers, Alexander H. Chapman 
'22 of the Arabian-American Oil 
Company, New Yark, will talk 
Monday night at 7:30 in the Big 
House. The following business- 
men are scheduled to interview 
members of the senior class dur- 
ing the coming week: 

Monday, March 7: Prom the Aet- 
na Life Insurance Company of 
IJartford comes Donald W. Crow- 
ther, superintendent of the Group 
Division, seeking those Interested 
in jobs as home ofBce Group re- 
presentatives. ^Jr. Crowther of- 
fers $3000 a year to start. 



Tuesday, March 8: George P, 
Whltcomb, Technical Supervisor 
of Employment and training, Cal- 
co Chemical Division, Bound 
Brook, N. J. requests that only 
men well grounded in Chemistry 
apply for positions in production 
supervision, process development, 
etc. 

Also on Tuesday, Carlton 
Knight, Jr., who is director for 
Lawrence R. McCoy and Com- 
pany, Worcester, Mass., Is look- 
ing for prospective members of 
his companies two year training 
program leading to sales work in 
the lumber business. 



Musical 



Moyer And Folsey 

"All That Glitters" wlU feature 
a score of thirteen songs with 
both lyrics and music by the au- 
thor. This large score ranges in 
variety from the love songs of Nell 
and Cynthia, to be played by Ro- 
nald Moyer '51 and Janet Folsey 
of the WlUlamstown High School, 
to the comedy songs of the Cady 
Family. In most instances the 
principal's vocal efforts will be 
supplemented by a large chorus 
which is comprised of thirty-five 
students. Sondhelm and David 
Bryant have been working with 
the chorus on songs for several 
weeks In an attempt to have ab- 
solute clarity In ennunciatlon of 
the lyrics. When the Record In- 
terviews the author- composer 
next week, he will discuss his mu- 
sical score in detail. 



D & D OFFICE 
SERVICE 

Let D & D Do Your 
Typing For You 

Leave material to be t'/ped 
at 85 Spring Street next to 
the Alumni House, 

Tel. North Adams 22 



SKIERS 

DREAM Package! 
7 FULL DAYS - $55 

From March 15 - April 15 

• Room and boord (3 meols per 
day). 

• Unlimited use of lift-Tows-ot 
Snow Valley Ski Area - Two 
ski lessons daily-Children's free 
use of "TOT TOWN". 

For reservations write or phone 

WORTHY INN 

Manchester, Vermont 

Tel. Manch. 92, 93 or 94W 

only 3 Vi hr$. from Boston, 4 Vi 

from N. Y. on U. S. 7. 

Color folder "X" on request 




Evenings continuous from 6:30 pm 



SATURDAY 

Deonno Durbin - Edmond O'Brien 

FOR THE LOVE 
OF MARY 

SUNDAY - MONDAY 

Gory Cooper - Ann Sheridan 

GOOD SAM 

TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY 

Joon Fontaine - Louis Jourdan 

LETTER FROM AN 
UNKNOWN WOMAN 




OPEN HOUSE at 

The|IntV' 



xU' 



Tortight and every Saturday Night 

\ 5 - 7 " 
Featuring the Purple Knights 



DROP Ihl ■ for a Hot Buttered Rum and informal dancing 



Squash - ^*-= — 

dropped his match to Smith of 
Amherst In four games, and Bill 
Mlkell followed suit, succumbing 
to Owens of the Jeffs In three 
quick games. The luck still seem- 
ed to be against Chaffee's boys as 
Jerry Dresser went down to Am- 
herst's Balmos In four games. In 
the number four match Randy 
Thomas of the Ephs and Steketee 
of Amherst fought It out through 
Ave long games. Thomas made a 
fine showing In coming from be- 
hind after losing the first two 
games and managed to tie the 
match up, only to, drop the fifth 
game. 

Close All The Way 

George Wright garnered the 
Purple's first point as he easily 
took Tim Martin over the ropes in 
four games. However, the other 
Martin, John, reversed the pro- 
cedure, subdueing Ephman Oeorge 
MuUer In a quick three game set. 
Bud Treman, playing seventh 
man for the Purple, encountered 
a tough adversary in Plerson of 
Amherst, but managed to add a 
point to the Williams score by 
winning in Ave games. Frank 
Donnelly's match with Snow of 
Amherst was another equally 
close and exciting affair, Donnelly 
coming out on top after five games 
Rog Dickinson in the number 
nine slot had an easy time of it, 
beating Amherst's Greene in three 
fast games. 

In the Freshman competition 
it was a different story as the 
Williams '52 copped a 5-4 victory 
at the expense of Amherst. 



Muirmen • • • i 

Immediately, after the varsity 
meet, at approximately 4 nm, 
the Amherst cubs scramble with 
the Williams yearlings. This iiro- 
mlses to be a good m^et, but the 
visitors seem to have a pre-n eet 
advantage. It should be a clash 
well worth watching, 




Tan Bunki 

available 

on 

Ford'i fomo 

88 foot Yoc 

"Advonet' 

Cruise New Englond with Co 
group - from 1 week to 3 mon 
June 15 - Sept. 15. Shore exper 
$75.00 Week. Write- 

LARRY JENSEN 
109-19 192 It. - S» Albons, 
, Long lilond, N. Y. C, N. Y 



TACONIC 

THEATRE 



lUCWI ONllil ■•»: "TlH IHml 
pictutt I hort crtr M«fl." 

ri> THEATRE GUILD tmrnu 

LAURENCE 

OLIVIER 

"Henry Y" 

M ntMCMN • Mwii Iki MM MM 

THURS. March 10 

9:30 a.m. 2:30 5:30 

8:30 p.m. 



1 




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/olume XLIII, Number 2 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1949 



price 10 cents 



Iwimmers^GrapplersWinLeagueTitles 



JC Picks Heineman, Olson, 
!*ynchoii As Slate Of Officers 



PresidiBiit A Leader 
n UC Last Year 



Dean Reveals College 
Holidays, New Rule 



In Its first full meeting Mon- 
day night, the newly-elected Un- 
dergraduate Council chose Andrew 
Helneman '50 as Its new Pres- 
ident. David M. Pynchon '50 was 
made Secretary, and Norman L 
Olson, Jr. '50, Treasurer, helne- 
man appointed a Rules and Nom- 
inations Committee to bring in a 
slate of nominations for other 
UC committees at the next 
meeting. 

In the business meeting prior 
to the elections, the UC discussed 
several questions. Dean Brooks 
mentioned a new rule, but a mo- 
ment later announced two unpre- 
cedented holidays next year. SAC 
President Schuyler Brooks reaf- 
firmed an earlier statement that 
.all Student Bookstore claims 
would be settled before the end of 
March 

President Heineman 

Helneman was chain-.ian of the 
Entertainment Committee of the 
UC last year. He was prominent 
in the lifting of the college cur- 
few, and was largely responsible 
for ,the writing of the present 
rules of conduct. He is also in Cap 
»nd Bells, on the Qui, is a Junior 
Advisor, itnrt ^ok. rstently Tiectcc' 
president of the Garfield Club. 

Pynchon is goalie on the hockey 
team, plays lacrosse. Is a Junior 
Advisor, in WCA, and is president 
of Delta Upsilon. Olson played 
football, was active In the Olee 
Club and WMS, was Vice-presi- 
dent of Phi Delta Theta last year, 
and is this year's President. 

Helneman appointed John Bo- 
wen '50 as chairman of the Rules 
and Nominations Committee. O- 
ther members are Herbert "Tim " 
Louis '50, Walter P. Stern '50 
and James P. Shea '50. Ben Far- 
rington '51 asked all house pres- 
idents to urge the payment ol 
WCA Chest Fund Drive pledges 
The amount outstanding is well 
over $3000, according to Farring- 
ton. 

Dean Brooks said that because 
of "danger to the JA's" the Dis- 
cipline Committee has recommen- 
ded passage of a rule forbidding 
the possession of air rifles. Re- 
cent action in the freshman quad 
made this move necessary. The 
Committee also recommended that 
there be another registration of 
firearms sometime next week. 

Two dates have been set aside 

See UC ELECTIONS, Page 4 

Eleanor Rumored 
New Smith Head 




New U C President 
Andrew D. Heineman 



Five Houses 
Name Officers 

Saints Playing It Cozy; 
Announcement Soon 



Varied Sets In 
AMT Musical 



Siebert's Cretv Designs 
Scenery For Show 



Clare Luce, MacLeish 
Still In The Running 



Smith College's latest flow of 
rumors has stemmed from the 
question, who is to replace Presi- 
dent Herbert Davis when he re- 
tires this June? Although most 
of the rumors in circulation seem 
to have Eleanor Roosevelt as the 
new president, Claire Booth Luce, 
' Archilmld MacLeish, and Reinhold 
Niebuhr are still in the running. 

In an attempt to squelch these 
rumors, MiSs Rich, Public Rela- 
tions OfHcer of Smith, has stated 
that the Identity of the new presi- 
dent will not be offlcially an- 
nounced "for some time". 'When 
asked directly as to Mrs. Roosfi' 
velt's future relationship with 
Smith, Miss Rich laughed and r^> 
plied, "I have no statement to 
make concerning Mrs, Roosevelt". 



In the last week five mpre fra- 
ternities elected their officers for 
the coming year. The only remain- 
ing house, the Saints, will an- 
jiounce their oflicers in the near 
futuie. 

Thursday night Kappa Alpha 
elected John Griggs pi'esldent and 
Dudley Irwin and Schuyler Brooks 
as vice-presidents. Peter Thurber 
was chosen secretary and James 
Irish, treasurer. Griggs is Presi- 
dent of the Junior Class, was cir- 
culation Manager of the "Gul" 
last year, and has captained fresh- 
man and JV soccer. Last year 
Irwin was President of the Soph- 
omore Class and this year he is 
I a JA. Co-Business Manager of the 
RECORD, and on the hockey 
team. Brooks holds the positions 
of Pi'esldent of the SAC. Business 
Manager of the "Gul", cheer- 
leader, and runs winter and spring 
track. 

Olson Heads Phi Delts 

The Phi Delts held their elec- 
tion Thursday night also, and 
named Norman Olson and Robert 
Bull as president and vice-presi- 
dent. Robert van Gorder and Dan- 
iel Mahoney wei'e elected secre- 
tary and treasurer, respectively. 
Olson is on the football team. 

Wednesday night the Phi Gams 
chose Irving Burrows president 
and Donald Gregory '51 and Wil- 
liam Sperry '51 as treasurer and 
secretary. Charles Hawkins was 
named Corresponding Secretary 
and William Davis, Historian. 
Burrows has been sqaash manager 
for the last two years and is a 
member of the Flying Club. 

Psl U Reelects Murphy 

Also on Wednesday night, the 
Psi , Us elected Stephen Murphy 
as president and John Presoott 
and Geoflrey Bennet as vice-pres- 
idents. William Hylahd '51 was 
chosen secretary and Congreve 
Quinby remains treasurer. Mur- 
phy was on the UC last year and 
John Prescott Is Co-Business Man- 
ager of the RECORD, on the 
Handbook, and In the WCA. 

The Phi Sigs named Howard 
Simpson and John Hardman as 
president and vice-president, re- 
spectively, and Albert McLean '51 
as secretary. Alfred Crane remains 
as treasurer. In his^ freshman and 
sophomore j^e^rs, Simpson w&s on^ 
the' RECOI^ and the lac>;ossej|, 
team. HaMinan works for the 
"Purple Cow" 'and the WCA. 



All That Glitters, Stephen 
Sondheim's new musical to be 
presented at the Adams Memorial 
Theatre March 18, 19, 21 and 22, 
is proving to set designer Otto 
Siebert '50 and his construction 
crew that all is not singing and 
dancing in the assembling of a 
musical show. In a Record inter- 
view yesterday Siebert pointed 
out some of the difflculties he has 
encountered in the designing and 
construction of scenery for the 
show. 

Siebert began by explaining the 
necessity of having a definite con- 
trast in design between the world 
of reality as depicted in the pro- 
logue and epilogue and that of 
illusion as depicted in the dream 
sequence which comprises acts 
one and two. The epilogue and 
prologue take place in the in- 
terior of Neil McRae's apartment, 
a typical habitat of any poor 
young composer battling for mu 
sical recognition in a disinterest- 
ed world. At the end of the pro 
logue Neil falls asleep and dreams 
of a marriage between himself and 
Miss Gladys Cady. This dream se- 
quence carries the newlyweds on 
a whirling and harem scarem tour 
which leads from their wedding 
to the railroad station, to the os- 
tentatious Cady mansion, to a 
night club, a court room, and an 
art factory. 

In a show with such numerous 
localities, the main problem , of 
the designer is to have his sets 
constructed so that Instantaneous 
changes may take place from one 
scene lio another. The sets will be 
See AMT, Page 4 



WOCers Still 
Seeking Snow 

Withhold Ticket Refunds 
Until 'Season's End' 



Taking an optomistic viewpoint 
concerning the prospects for more 
snow, Williams Outing Club Pres- 
ident Charles Schaaf '50, an- 
nounced last week that refunds 
on Sheep Hill season tickets will 
be made "as soon as the skiing 
season is definitely over." 

In adherence with a previously 
stated policy, ticket holders will 
be refunded on the basis of a 
fifteen day minimum skiing per- 
iod. If at the end of the season, 
the tow has not run for fifteen 
days, refund payments will be 
made for each day short of this 
figure. 

As yet it has not been decided 
whether or not to include the 
three days of midterm skiing as 
part of the season. If these days 
are included and it does not snow 
again, the tow will have operated 
thirteen days. Skiers will then re- 
ceive two- fifteenths of the pur- 
chase price of their tickets, or 
$1.60 out of a $12 ticket. 

- Chief outing club activity dur- 
ing the next few weeks will be a 
ski outing with Smith this week- 
end which, atcording to Schaaf, 
will be "one of the best this year." 
After enjoying skiing, singing find 
square dancing on Saturday, tw| 
Smith girls and ten Williams men 
will spend their remaining energy 
in a "hacker's ski race" on Sun. 



Teams Whip Jeffs^ 
Matmen Undefeated 



Lightweights 
Spark Victory 



Mermen Sink 
Jeffs, 56-19 



Cultural Cold War Subject 
Of Prof. Richard's Lecture 



"Words, Wishes, and Whys," a lecture on the present day cul- 
tural crisis, "the cold war between science and poetry, " by Ivar Arm- 
strong Richards, University Professor at Harvard, was presented by 
the Lecture Committee last Friday evening in Jesup. 

The essential difference between 3 

science and poetry, Mr. Richards I time." 

said, is that there Is a realization He doubted if educational reforms 



poetry which one does not find 
in science. "This is the cultural 
crisis. It is more dangerous, more 
fundamental, and moor deep root- 
ed than the political squabble. A 
United Studies organization is 
needed to resolve that crisis," he 
stated. It is difficult to find a bi- 
partisan or non-partisan answer 
to this crisis. Both poetry and sci- 
ence can point to agressions upon 
them. Poetry 13» accused of trying 
to repress science; science it is 
charged, wants to conquer the 
world. 

Man Homogenized 

No man, said Mr. Richards, is 
just a poet or a scientist, nor even 
a mixture of the two. If he vkte 
merely mixed it would not be so 
bad, but man is homogenized. Man 
is so well mixed up he is being 
emulsified. The permanent struc- 
ture of the mind is being im- 
paired by such a conflict. Science 
is like a cold cloud formation, 
poetry like warm clouds, and man 
is caught in the eddies of uncer- 
tainty between them. 

In raising the question as to 
what could be done to control 
language, Mr. Richards first haz- 
arded a guess as to what might 
be the cause of the dllemna. He 
ventured the opinion that a good 
deal of the "barren, dead, mech- 
anical emi^8k)i| ot language may 
be du^ to 1 «f cademi<^ examinations. 
Teacl^^ do i^ot tesu:h,,,but train 
thelri«|udent8 jtp wri^j long ver- 
bc|^;,,;ejcfunbu^t4pn»,. In. a short 



I will soon come about because they 
sjanpojd am uiojj auioo Ajuo weo 
of this system. Most educational 
reforms end up In a rather re- 
verse form from the way they 
started, and the patient in a 
worse state than when he began. 
The language that we use to dis- 
cuss language is the most befud- 
dling and confusing of all. 
Semantics Not A Science 
"Semantics," he said, "at- 
tempts to be, but is not really sci- 
entific. Semanticlsts have not yet 
applied their work to literature. 
Words carry a certain redolence 
from the words that they rhyme 
with." Taking the word "humani- 
tarian" as an example, Mr. Rich- 
ards showed how it was trying to 
do a "decent and noble job," but 
failed because of the words with 
which It rhymed like "octogenar- 
ian." "vegetarian." "proletarian," 
"totalitarian," and numerous o- 
ther — arians". 

Mr. Richards stated that words 
that belong to a similar rhyme 
scheme and that have something 
in common have a way of making 
that rhyme scheme more vivid. 
The indirect Influence of other 
words having the same meaning 
and sound is called expressiveness 
in language. 

Raising the question "can the 
organized science called seman- 
tics have any success," Mr, Rich- 
ards stated that it was too early 
to be optimistic. "Semantics," he 
said, "is not really a 'science," it 
may sometimes be called "seml- 
antlcs." 



by M. C. Behre 

Defeating Amherst in simul- 
taneous matches last Saturday, 
the Williams wrestlers, both var- 
sity and freshmen, annexed the 
Little Three crown to climax an 
undefeated season. Before a large 
Lasell Gym gallery. Coach Bul- 
lock's varsity emerged victors by 
a narrow 14-18, margin while Harv 
Potter's yearlings scored a more 
decisive 19-13 win. 

With decisions for Captain Paul 
Cook, Scrubby Perry, Paul Shorb 
and Green Carleton and a draw 
for Bill Kelton, the Ephs gained 
a 14-2 advantage which the last 
three Amherst victories couldn't 
offset. The Opening match, be- 
tween Bill Keiton and Taft at 121 
lbs., resulted in an even 1-1 tie. 
giving two points score to each 
team. 

Perry Earns Record 

At 128 lbs. Captain Paul Cook 
started the string of decisions 
that won the meet for the Ephs. 
His opponent, Beebe, put up an 
exhausting fight and matched 
Cook for points; having over five 
minutes time-advantage, however, 
the Williams captain won 10-8. 
SciUbby Perry, al 136 lbs., then 
took a one-sided 4-0 de- 
cision over Rowland. This win 
made a perfect record for Perry 
this season. He stands the only 
man on the team who took all 
six victories in as many contests. 

Paul Shorb. meeting Chapin 
at 145 lbs., continued the chain 
of decisions gaining an 8-2 score 
in a fast, but one-sided, contest. 
With another decisive victory. 
Green Carleton at 155 lbs. had 
little trouble with Dewey tallying 
an 11-3 decision with the aid of 
four takedowns. 

These four straight wins compri- 
sed the scoring bid by the Ephs 
and were enough to take the meet 
although the outcome was not de- 

Amhersts Co-captaln Keith R. 
cided until the last match, 
overpowered Bill Leltzinger at 165 
lbs. Two points for time-advan- 
tage gave the former a 5-2 deci- 
sion. In the 175 lb. slot Jim Roush 
also Co-Captain, scored the meet's 
only fall by downing Pete Smythe 
in five minutes, seven seconds. In 
the last match John Stillwell 
failed at Unlimited and McGrath 
took the decision 4-2 to bring 
their total to 13. 

Reverse 1948 Result 

It is interesting that this score. 
14-13. was exactly the same as 
last year's result when the Ephs 
were on the short end. 

In the Freshman match which 
ran simultaneously, the yearlings 
dropped the first two bouts to 
Amherst as Pruyne took a 4-0 de- 
cision from Aaron Katcher and 
Fred Pew lost by a second period 
fall to Monroe. Fred Toppan's 
decisive 7-0 victory over Humph- 
rey started the Eph attack. Tom 
Evans at 145 lbs. pinned Slris with 
a little over a minute to go. This 
brought the score to 8-8. 

Bill Callaghan then continued 
his perfect record of victories at 
155 lbs. His opponent, Maxson, 
was pinned in five minutes, ele- 
ven seconds by a halt-nelson and 
farther arm lock. Also undefeated 
is Jim Shanahan who took a 5-3 
decision over Porsythe after a 
fairly even fight. 

The Jeffs took their last score 
in the 175 lb. match when Mc- 
arath pinned Simpson, a substi- 
tute for Dick Edwards, in four 

, See LXOHTWEIOHTS, Page 2 

' « , 



by Norm Wood 

Shattering a record at the start, 
and yielding but one first place to 
ams steamrollered on to a lop- 
sided victory last Saturday after- 
a visiting Amherst squad, Willl- 
noon in Lasell Pool by trimming 
the Jeffs, 56-19. 

Only diver-captain Tom Pul- 
ton could pick up five points for 
Amherst, as the Purple grabbed 
its sixth win of the season and 
fourteenth Little Three crown, 
the fourth In a row. The triumph 
brought the Eph total through 
the years to 17, one shy of Am- 
herst's 18. 

Medley Trio Smashes 

The 300 medley relay team gave 
Williams fans something to shout 
about at the start as Co-captain 
Hank Wlneman, Swede Svenson, 
and Moe Murray roared over the 
course in 3:01.1. This time skim- 
med one-tenth of a second off 
the college record set at Army in 
January. 

Bob Reid also turned in a low 
time. After Svenson had breast- 
stroked his way to a first in a well 
swum race, and with his win 
clinched the Little Three title, 
the F -pie's d stance twins. Held • 
and Sandy Lambert put on a two 
man race. Lambert jumped into 
an early lead, but Reid rallied at 
225, and slipped into first. From 
then he steadily pulled away and 
crossed the line at 4:560. 
AU-Round Power 

The outcome was a question of 
too much of just about everything 
for Williams. The Purple snatched 
both relays by close to twenty 
yards. Co-captain Ray Baldwin 
had little trouble copping the 220. • 
Wincman took the 150 backstroke, 
and teammate Ted Lammpt took 
second place. 

In the sprints. Bill Rueckert 
and Chick Brashears finished one 
two in the 50, and George Coale 
captured the 100. The dive was 
very close. Fulton won by about 
seven points. Ephman Cliff Sto- 
wers placed second, 1.62 points a- 
head of Bill Sperry. Sperry had 
See MERMEN, Page 4 



State Recognition 
Given Federalists 



Cord Myer To Lecture 
Here On March 15 



World Federalism has gained 
official recognition in the state 
of Massachusetts; Governor Paul 
A. Dever has proclaimed the week 
of March 6-13 as "World Feder- 
alist Week". 

In connection with World Fed-** 
eralism the Williams College Lee-;,- 
ture Committee is sponsoring a 
lecture to be presented by Cord 
Myer, Jr., the presjjjeiit of the 
U.W.P., on March 15 in Chapin 
HaU. 

Higl^lighting the local chapter^s" 
recent activities are a series of 
four fifteen minute broadcasts on 
World Federalism that the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System will rtm 
in April. These forum-type broad- 
casts will lie heard over a nation- 
wide hook-up. ^^ 

In February the Williams World 
Federalists conducted 16 speaking 
engagements, as a result of which 
they were instrumental in the es- 
tablishing of three new chapters. 
The month of February also added 
20 new names to their roster. 



■'fTl^r'-r 



■'.■TV ^ 1- 



■Vf. 



.-■™4^.'...J-».„ .-- J 



SiTftifivi' 



.i4v; 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY;' MARCH 5, 1949 



^ 



Languages Vital 
Say Root, Stocking 

Eiuphasi'/.es Position In 
Liberal Arts Education 



Chapman Of Arabian American Oil 
To Gush In Second Of Job Series 



Both English and foreign languag- 
es lielp to acquaint students with 
the world in wliich they live, a- 
Kieed Piofessors Winthrop H. Root 
Professor of Germain and Fred H. 
SlockinK, Assistant Professor of 
English, in a discussion of the 
reliitive positions of these two sub- 
jects m a liberal arts curriculum 
at the fifth in a series of six fresh- 
man orientation programs, in Je- 
sup Hall March 1 at 7:30. 

'LanKuages are the step-child- 
ren of today, the forgotten Cin- 
derellas," claimed Dr. Root. "And 
yet, all achievements in politics, 
economics, and history are based 
on a knowledge of language 
Someday," he predicted, "lan- 
guages will be princes," 

Purpo.se of English 

Since a liberal arts education 
will determme "what kind of guy 
you turn out to be." Dr. Stock 
ing reasoned, a study of English 
is necessary lo "lielp you become 
a unique and significant indivi- 
dual, and 10 en,ioy life." He 
pointed out that, although Eng- 
lish will not make one a good 
businessman, it can "acquaint you 
with tlie internal and private pro 
blems of men". 

A language, in turn, .said Dr. 
Root, gives llie benefit of a for 
cign literature. Thus, it "teaches 
us to understand the French and 
Germans." somethnig vital in to 
day's world. In addition, the Eng 
lish language means more after a 
study of derivations and grammar 
At the same time, "we have an 
aesthetic, artistic approach." 

Both instructors outlined the 
requirements for a major. Each 
called attention to the need for 
such cour.ses m graduate school 
requirements. 



WMS Sche(hile -- 

Friday 

5:00 The Afternoon Roundup 
7:30 Semi-Classical Mu.s!c 
8:00 Classical Hour 
9:00 News and Sports 
9:30 Old Chuck Wagon 
10:00 Semi-Classical Music 
1(7:30 An Hour of "Mostly For 
Dreaming ' 

.Saturday 
.'):30-()3O Williams Inn Show 
Music and Interviews 



As the second in the Spring, Tuesday, March 8: George P, 
series of vocational guidance ; Whitcomb, Technical Supervisor 
speakers, Alexander H. Chapman 
22 of the Arabian-American Oil 
Company, New Yark, will talk 
Monday night at 7:30 in the Sig 
House, The following business- 
men are scheduled to interview 
members of the senior class dur- 
ing the coming week: 



Monday, March 7: Prom the Aet- 
na Life Insurance Company of 
Hartford comes Donald W, Crow- 
ther, superintendent of the Group 
Division, seeking those interested 
in Jobs as home office Group re- 
presentatives. Mr. Crowther of- 
fers $3000 a year to start. 



of Employment and training, Cal- 
co Chemical Division, Bound 
Brook, N, J. requests that only 
men well grounded in Chemistry 
apply tor positions in production 
supervision, process development, 
etc. 

Also on Tuesday. Carlton 
Knight, Jr., who is director for 
Lawrence R. McCoy and Com- 
pany, Worcester, Mass,, is look- 
ing for prospective members of 
his companies two year training 
program leading to .sales work in 
the lumber business. 



Musical 



Moyer And Foisey 

"All That Glitters" will feature 
a score of thirteen songs with 
both lyrics and music by the au- 
thor. This large score ranges in 
variety from the love songs of Nell 
and Cynthia, to be played by Ro- 
nald Moyer '51 and Janet Foisey 
of the Williamstown High School, 
to tlie comedy songs of the Cady 
Family. In most instances the 
principal's vc::al efforts will be 
supplemented by a large chorus 
which is comprised of thirty-five 
students. Sondheim and David 
Bryant have been working with 
the cliorus on songs for several 
weeks in an attempt to have ab- 
solute clarity in ennunciation of 
the lyrics. When the Record In- 
terviews the author- composer 
next week, he will di,scu,ss his mu- 
sical score in detail. 



D & D OFFICE 
SERVICE 

Let D & D bo Your 
Typing For You 

Leave motenol to be typed 
at 85 Spring Street next to 
the Alumni House 

Tel North Adams 22 



SKIERS 

DREAM Package! 
7 FULL DAYS - $55 

From MnfCh i 'j April ' S 

• Room ond board '3 meols per 

day I . 

• Unlimited use of lif»-Tows-at 

Snow Valley Ski Area - Two 
ski lessons daily-Children's free 
' use of "TOT TOWN". 

For reservations write or phone 

WORTHY INN 

Manchester, Vermont 

Tel. Monch. 92, 93 or 94W 

only 3 ''2 hrs. from Boston, 4V2 

from N. Y. on U. S. 7. 

Color folder "X" on request 




Evenings continuous from 6:30 pm 



SATURDAY 

Drnnno Durbin - Edmond O'Brien 

FOR THE LOVE 
OF MARY 

SUNDAY - MONDAY 

Gory Cooper Ann Sherition 



GOOD SAM 



TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY 

Joan Fontaine - Louis Jourdan 

LETTER FROM AN 
UNKNOWN WOMAN 



OPEN HOUSE at 




U' 



.nn 



Tiinifjht iuM.\ every Saturday Night 

Featuring the Purple Knights 

DROP //\ • jor a Hot Buttered Rum and mjormcd daiwin^ 



Squash 



dropped his match to Smith of 
Amherst In four games, and Bill 
Mlkell followed suit, succumbinK 
to Owens of the Jeffs in three 
quick games. The luck still seem- 
ed to be against. Chaffee's boys as 
Jerry Dresser went down to Am- 
herst's Balmos in four games. In 
the number four match Randy 
Thomas of the Ephs and Steketee 
of Amherst fought it out through 
five long games, Thomas made a 
fine showing in coming -from be- 
hind after lo.sing the first two 
games and managed to tic the 
match up, only to drop the fifth 
game. 

Close All The Way 

George Wright garnered the 
Purple's first point as he easily 
took Tim Martin over the ropes in 
four games. However, the other 
Murtln, John, reversed the pro- 
cedure, subdueiiig Ephman George 
MuUer in a quick three game ,set. 
Bud Treman, playing .seventh 
man for the Purple, encountered 
a tough adversary in Picr,son of 
Amherst, but managed to add a 
point to the Williams score by 
winning in Ave games. Frank 
Donnelly's match with Snow of 
Amherst was another equally 
clcse and exciting affair, Donnelly 
L-oming out on top after five Kanics 
Rog Dickinson in the number 
nine slot had an easy time of it, 
beating Amherst's Greene in lliree 
fast games. 

In tlie Freshman competition 
it was a dillerent story as the 
Williams '52 copped a 5-4 victory 
at the expense of Amherst. 



Muirmen - 



Immediately after the vuraty 
meet, at approximately 4 1, m 



the Amherst cubs scramble ,> 
tlie Williams yearlings. This ' 
mlses to be a gpod meet, but 
visitors seem lo have a pre-' 
advantage. It should be a 1 
well worth watching. 



th 
' 5- 
■he 
','et 




Ten Bunk. 

ovaKabIc 

on 

Ford'i fame 

88 toot Yor 

"Advonce' 



Cruise New England with Ci 
group from I week to 3 mor 
June I '3 - Sept 15 Shore expf 
$7 5 00 Week Write 

LARRY JENSEN 
109-19 192 St. - it Alboni, 
Long lilond, N, Y. C, N. Y 



TACONK 

THEATRE 



tUGlNt ONIILL tari "Tht llntit 
picture I ha<f »vif ic«n." 

Tif IHk^TRF. Gl ll.l) ,fr»nu 

LAURENCE 

OLIVIER 

Henry Y* 

IN UCINICILII • t*ttii Tin UHlitf Atlsb 





CoprtiitlN 1949, Umrt * M^ ToMon Oh 



%e mnii 



Volume XLIII, Number 2 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3R^£afit 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1949 



Price 10 cents 



Swimmers^GrapplersWiiiLeagueTitles 



UC Picks Heineman, Olson, 
Pynchon As Slate Of Officers 



"President A Leader 
In UC Last Year 



Dean Kcveal»i (>ollege 
Holidays, New Kiilc 



fc In its flisl full meptinn Mon- 
"day nlKlit. the newly-cloclpd Un- 
deiKiaduati' Council cliose Andie« 
D, Heineman '50 as its new Pres- 
ident. David M. Pynelton '50 wa.' 
made Secielary. and Norman L 
Olson. Jr. '50. Treasurer Heine- 
. man appointed a Rules and Nom- 
: inutions Committee to brinu in a 
' slate of nominations for other 
UC eommittees at tlie next 
meeting. 

In tile busmess meeting prior 
to the elections, the UC discussed 
\ several questions. Dean Brooks 
• mentioned a new rule, but a mo- 
' ment latei' announced two unpre- 
i. cedented holidays next year. SAC 
President Schuyler Biooks reaf- 
firmed an earlier statement that 
«11 Student Bookstore claims 
would be settled before 'he end of 
Mai'ch 

President Ileineinan 
Heuir'man was chairiian of the 
Kntcrtainm.ent Commit 'ee of the 
lie lust year. He w as prominent 
in the lifting of til*' colleue cur- 
few, and was largely responsible 
'or the writing of the present 
: ulfs of conduct. He is also in Cap 
pad Bells, on the Gul. is a Junior 
■ Ad-, i..i):, nn*! '"as :.;ently ■ifrtet.' 
president of the Garfield Club. 

Pynchon is goalie on the hockey 
team, plays hicros.se. is a Junior 
Advl.sor, in WCA. and Is president 
of Delta Upsilon, Olson played 
football, was active In the Glee 
Club and WMS. was Vice-presi- 
dent of Phi Delta Thela last year, 
and is this year's President. 

Heineman appointed John Bo- 
wen '50 as chairman of the Rules 
«Btid Nominations Committee, O- 
ther members are Hci'bert "Tim " 
Louis '50, Walter P, Stern '50 
and James P Shea '50, Ben Far- 
rlngton '51 asked all house pres- 
idents to uige the payment ol 
WCA Chest Fund Drive pledRcs 
THe amount outstanding is well 
over $3000, according to Farring- 
ton. 

Dean Brooks said that because 
of "danger to the JA's" the Dis- 
cipline Committee has recommen- 
~ ded pa.s,sage of a I'ule foi'bidding 
the po.sse.ssion of air ''ifles. Re- 
cent action In the freshman quad 
made this move necessary. The 
Committee al.so lecommended that 
thei'p be another registration of 
fliearms .sometime next week. 
Two dates have been set aside 
See UC ELECTIONS, Page 4 

Eleanor Rumored 
New Smith Head 




Varied Sets In 
AMT Musical 



Scenery For Show 



WOCers Still 
Seeking Snow 

Withhold Tick«tR«f«nds 
Until 'Season's End' 



Taking an optomistic viewpoint 
concerning the prospects for more 
snow. Williams Outing Club Pres- 
ident Charles Schaaf '50, an- 
nounced last week that refunds 
on Sheep Hill season tickets will 
be made "as soon as the skiing 
season Is definitely over," 



New U C President 
Andrew D, Heineman 



Five Houses 
Name Officers 

Saints Pla\in^ II C.o/.y : 
.Aniiounceinciit Soon 



t 



Clare Lnce, iNIacLeish 
Still In The Hiinning 



Smith College's latest flow of 
rumors has stemmed from the 
question, who is to replace Presi- 
dent Herbert Davis when he I'e- 
tires this June? Although most 
of the rumors In circulation seem 
to have Eleanor Roosevelt as the 
new president. Claire Booth Luce, 
Ai'chlbald MacLelsh. and Reinhold 
Niebuhr aic still in the running. 

In an attempt to squelch these 
rumors. Miss Rich. Public Rela- 
tions Officer of Smith, has stated 
that the identity of the new presi- 
dent will not be otriclally an- 
nounced "for .some time". When 
asked directly as to Mrs, Roose- 
velt's futuie relation.shlp with 
Smith. Miss Rich laughed and I'ti- 
plied. "I have no statement to 
make concerning Mrs. Roosevelt", 



In the last week five more fra- 
ternities elected their officers for 
the coming year. The only rcinaln- 
house. the Saints, will an- 
icuiiff I'lelr officers Ip -he »ien'- 
niture. 

Thursday night Kappa Alpha 
elected John Griggs president and 
Dudley Irwin and Schuyler Bi'ooks 
as vice-presidents. Peter Thurber 
was chosen secretary and James 
Irish, treasurer. Griggs is Presi- 
dent of the Junior Class, was cir- 
culation Manager of the "Gul " 
last year, and has captained fresh- 
man and JV ,soccer. Last year 
Irwin was President of the Soph- 
omore Class and this year he is 
a JA, Co-Business Manager of the 
RECORD, and on the hockey 
team. Brooks holds the positions 
of President of the SAC, Bu.siness 
Manager of the "Gul", cheer- 
leader, and runs winter and spring 
track, 

Olson Heads Phi Delts 

The Phi Delts held their elec- 
tion Thursday night also, and 
named Norman OLson and Robert 
Bull as president and vice-presi- 
dent, Robert van Gorder and Dan- 
iel Mahoney were elected ,seci-e- 
tary and treasui'er, respectively, 
OLson is on the football team, 

Wednesday night the Phi Gams 
chose Irving Burrows president 
and Donald Gregory '51 and Wil- 
liam Sperry '51' as treasui'er and 
secretary, Charles Hawkins was 
named Corresponding Seci'etary 
and William Davis, Historian, 
Buri'ows has been squash manager 
foi' the last two years and is a 
member of the Flying Club, 

Psi U Reelects IVlurphy 

Also on Wednesday night, the 
Psi U's elec.tpd Stephen Muriihy 
as president and John Prcscott 
and Geoffrey Bennet as vice-pi'es- 
idents, William Hyland '51 was 
chesen secretaiy and Congreve 
Quinby remains treasurer. Mur- 
phy was on the UC la.st year and 
John Pi-escott is Co-Business Man- 
ager of the RECORD, on the 
Handbook, and in the WCA, 

The Phi Sigs named Howard 
Sinipson and John Hardman as 
pi'esident and vice-president. I'e- 
spectlvely. and Albert McLean '51 
as secretary, Alfred Crane remains 
as treasurer. In his freshman and 
sophomore years, Simpson was on 
the RECORt^ and the lacl-osse 
team, Hardman works for the 
"Purple Cow" and the WCA. 



All That Glitters. Stephen 
Sondheim's new musical to be 
presented at the Adams Memorial 
Theatre March 18. 19, 21 and 22. 
Is pioving to set designer Otto 
Siebert '50 and his consti'uction 
crew that all is not singing and 
dancing In the a.ssembling of a 
musical show. In a Record inter- 
\'lew yesterday Siebert pointed 
out .some of the dlfflculties he has 
encounteied in the designing and ; In adherence with a previously 
construction of scenery for the • stated policy, ticket holders will 
*' : be refunded on the ba.sls of a 

Siebei-t began by explaining the ! ^^^^^^ ^^^ minimum skiing per- 
necessity of having a definite con- j 

.... . . ,, , . ! iod. If at the end of the sea.son, 

trast in design between the world 

of reality as depicted In the pro- t'^' lo«' has not run for fifteen 
logue and epilogue and that of days, refund payments will be 
illusion as depicted In the dream 1 made for each day short of this 

I figure. 



Teams Whip Jeffs; 
Matmen Undefeated 



sequence which comprises acts . 



one and two. The epilogue and 

prologue take place in the in- 1 As yet it has not been decided 

terlor of Nell McRae's apartment. I whether or not to include the 

a typical habitat of any poor j j^,.^ , ^^^.^ ^^ midterm skiing as 

young composer battling for mu- 1 

" , ... J . 1 I part of the season. If these days 

sical recognition in a di.sintcrest- 

ed world. At the end of the pro- j ^'^ included and It does not .snow 
logue Nell falls asleep and dreams again, the tow will have opei'ated 
of a marriage between himself and thirteen days. Skiers will then re- 



Lightweights 
Spark Victory 



by M. C. Behrc 

Defeating Amhei-st In simul- 
taneous matches last Saturday, 
the Williams wrestlers, both var- 
sity and freshmen, annexed the 
Little Three crown to climax an 
undefeated .season. Before a lai'ge 
Lasell Gym gallery. Coach Bul- 
Ijck's varsity emerged victoi's by 
a nan'ow 14-13 margin while Harv 
Potter's yearlings scored a more 
decisive 19-13 win. 

With decisions for Captain Paul 
Cook. Scrubby Perry. Paul Shorb 
and Green Carleton and a draw 
for Bill Kelton. the Ephs gained 
a 14-2 advantage which the last 
thi-ee Amherst victories couldn't 
offset. The opening match, be- 
tween Bill Kelton and Taft at 121 
lbs., resulted in an even 1-1 tie. 
giving two points score to each 
team. 



Mi.ss Gladys Cady. This dream se- 
quence carries the newlyweds ,on 
a whirling and harem .scarem tour 
which leads from their wedding 
to the railroad station, to the os- 
tentatious Cady mansion, to a 
night club, a court room, and an 
i"-t factors-. 

In a show with such numerous 
localities, the main problem of 



celve two-flfteenths of the pur 
cha.se price of their tickets, o 
S1.60 out of a $12 ticket. 

Chief outing club activity dur 
Ing the next few weeks will be a 
.ski outing with Smith this week 
.^nd v.hlc;'.. accirding to .Schaef. 
will be "one of the best this year. 
After enjoying skiing, singing and 



the designer is to have his sets ^^^^^^.^ dancing on Saturday, ten 
constructed so that instantaneous j ^^^^^^^ ^j,.;.. ^^^ ^^^ Williams men 
changes may take place fi'om one , ^.j,j ^^^^^ ^^^^^. remaining energy 



ene to another. The sets will be 
See AMT. Page 4 



in a "hacker's ski race" on Sun 



Cultural Cold War Subject 
Of Prof. Richard's Lecture 



"Words. Wishes, and Whys," a lecture on the present day cul- 
tural crisis, "the cold war between .science and poetry." by Ivar Arm- 
strong Richards. University Professor at Harvai'd. was presented by 
the Lecture Committee last Fi'lday evening in Jesup, 

The es.sential dlfleience between :> 

science and poetry, Mr. Richards , t'f"<^" 

said is that thei-e is a realization He doubted if educational reforms 
or sub.lectlve Interpi'etation In I «ill soon come about because they 
poetry which one does not find si3npo.id am mo.ij auioo Aiuo utSD 

of this system. Most educational 



in .science. "This Is the cultural 
crisis. It Is more dangerous, more 
fundamental, and moor deep root- 
ed than the political squabble. A 
United Studies organization is 
needed to I'esolve that crisis." he 
stated. It Is difficult to find a bi- 
partisan or non-pai-tisan answer 
to this crisis. Both poetry and sci- 
ence can point to agressions upon 
them. Poetry is accused of trying 
to i'cpress science; science It is 
charged, wants to conquer the 
world. 

Man Homogenized 

No man. said Mr. Richards, is 
just a poet or a scientist, nor even 
a mixture of the two. If he were 
merely mixed It would not be so 
bad. but man is homogenized. Man 
is so well mixed up he is being 
emulsified. The permanent struc- 
ture of the mind is being im- 
paired by such a conflict. Science 
is like a cold cloud _ formation, 
poetiy like warm clouds, and man 
Is caught in the eddies of uncer- 
tainty between them. 

In i-Rlslng the question as "o 
what could be done to control 
language. Mr. Richards first haz- 
arded a guess as to what might 
be the cause of the dilemna. He 
ventured the opinion that a good 
deal of the "barren, dead, mech- 
anical emission of. language may 
be due to academic examinations, 
Teachei's do not teach, but train 
thelt. students to write long ver- 
bose examinations in a short 



I'eforms end up in a rather re- 
verse form from the way they 
started, and the patient in a 
worse state than when he began. 
The language that we use to dis- 
cuss language Is the most befud- 
dling and confusing of all. 
Semantics Not A Science 
"Semantics," he said, "at- 
tempts to be. but Is not really sci- 
entific, Semanticlsts have not yet 
applied their work to literature. 
Words carry a certain redolence 
from the words that they rhyme 
with," Taking the word "humani- 
tai'ian" as an example. Mr. Rich- 
ards showed how it was trying to 
do a "decent and noble job." but 
failed because of the words with 
which it i-hymed like "octogenar- 
ian." "vegetarian." "proletarian.' 
"totalitarian." and numerous o 
ther — arians". 

Mr. Richards stated that words 
that belong to a similar rhyme 
scheme and that have something 
i;i comtpon have a way of making 
that rhyme scheme more vivid. 
The indirect Influence of other 
words having the same meaning 
and .sound is called expressiveness 
in language. 

Raising the question "can the 
organized science called seman- 
tics have any success." Mr, Rich- 
ards stated that it was too early 
to be optimistic, "Semantics." he 
said, "is not really a science," it 
ffiay sometimes be called "semi- 
antics," 



Mermen Sink 
Jeffs, 56-19 



by Norm Wood 

SliiUtering a record at the start, 
and yielding but one first place to 
ams sleamiollered on to a lop- 
sided victory last Saturday after- 
a visiting Amherst squad. Willi- 
noon in La,sell Pool by trimming 
the Jeffs, 56-19, 

Only diver-captain Tom Pul- 
ton could pick up five points for 
Amherst, as the Purple gi-abbed 
its Sixth win of the season and 
fourteenth Little Three crown. 
the fourth in a row. The triumph 
brought the Eph total through 
the years to 17, one shy of Am- 
herst's 18, 



Perry Earns Record 

At 128 lbs. Captain Paul Cook 
started the string of decisions 
that won the meet for the Ephs. 
His opponent. Beebe, put up an 
exhausting fight and matched 
Cook for points: having over five 
minutes time-advantage, however, 
the Williams captain won 10-8, 
&^iUbb> Perry, aL 136 ius.. Ilieji 
took a one-sided 4-0 de- 
cision over Rowland. This win 
made a perfect record for Perry 
this sea.son. He stands the only 
man on the team who took all 
six victoi'ies in as many contests. 

Paul Shorb. meeting Chapin 
at 145 lbs., continued the chain 
of decisions gaining an 8-2 score 
In a fast, but one-sided, contest. 
With another decisive victory. 
Green Carleton at 155 lbs, had 
little trouble with Dewey tallying 
an 11-3 decision with the 
four takedowns. 



Medley Trio Smashes 

The 300 medley relay team gave 
Williams fans something to shout 
about at the start as Co-captain 
Hank Wineman, Swede Svenson. 
and Moe Murray roared over the 
course in 3:01,1. This time skim- 
med one-tenth of a second off 
the college record set at Army in 
January. 

Bob Reid also turned In a low 
time. After Svenson had breast- 
stroked his way to a first in a well 
swum race, and with his win 
cllnchc d the Little Three title, 
the F -pie's d st;ince twins, Ilcld 
and Sandy Lambert put on a two 
man I'ace. Lambert jumped into 
an early lead, but Reid I'allied at 
225, and slipped into first. Fi'om 
then he steadily pulled away and 
crossed the line at 4:56 0. 
.Ail-Round Power 

The outcome was a question of 
too much of just about cvei'sthing 
for Williams. The Pui'ple snatched 
both relays by close to twenty 
yards. Co-captain Ray Baldwin 
had little trouble copping the 220. 
aid of i Wineman took the 150 backstroke, 
and teammate Ted Lamrnqt took 



These four sti'aight wins compri- 
.sed the .scoring bid by the Ephs 
and were enough to take the meet 
although the outcome was not de- 
Amhersts Co-captain Keith R. 
cided until the last match. 



second place. 

In the sprints. Bill Rueckert 
and Chick Bra.sheai'S finished one 
two in the 50. and George Coale 
captured the 100. The dive was 
\'ery close. Fulton won by about 



State Recogjnition 
Given Federalists 



Cord Myer To Lecture 
Here On March 15 



overpowered Bill Leitzlnger at 165 sp^c" Points. Ephman Cliff Sto- 

Ibs. Two points for time-advan- "'Prs placed second. 1.62 points a- 

tage gave the former a 5-2 dcci- i '""ad of Bill Sperry. SpeiTy had 

sion. In the 175 lb. slot Jim Roush | See MERMEN. Page 4 

al.so Co-Captain, scored the meet's 

only fall by downing Pete Smythe 

In five minutes, seven seconds. In 

the last match John Stillwell 

failed at Unlimited and McGrath 

took the decision 4-2 to bring 

their total to 13. 

Reverse 1948 Result 
It is interesting that this score. 

14-13. was exactly the .same as 

last year's result when the Ephs 

were on the short end. 
In the Freshman match which 

ran simultaneously, the yearlings 

dropped the first two bouts to 

Amherst as Pruyne took a 4-0 de- 
cision from Aaron Katcher and 
Pi'ed Pew lost by a second period 
fall to Monroe. Fred Toppan's 
decisive 7-0 victoi"y over Humph- 
rey started the Eph attack. Tom 
Evans at 145 lbs. pinned Slris with 
a little over a minute to go. This 
brought the score to B-8. 

Bill Callaghan then continued 
his perfect lecord of victories at 
155 lbs. His opponent. Maxson. 
was pinned in five minutes, ele- 
ven .seconds by a half-nelson and 
farther arm lock. Also undefeated 
is Jim Shanahan who took a 5-3 
decision over Forsythe after a 
fairly even fight. 

The Jeffs took their last score 
in the 175 lb. match when Mc- 
Grath pinned Simpson, a substi- 
tute for Dick Edwards, in four 
See LIOHT'WEIOHTS. Page 2 



World Fedei'alism has gained 
official recognition . in the state 
of Massachusetts: Governor Paul 
A. Dever has proclaimed the week 
of March 6-13 as "World Feder- 
alist Week". 

In connection with World Fed- 
eralism the Williams College Lec- 
ture Committee is sponsoring a 
lecture to be presented by Cord 
Myer. Jr.. the president of the 
U.W.F.. on March 15 in Chapin 
Hall. 

Highlighting the local chapter's 
recent aotivities are a series of 
four fifteen minute broadcasts on 
World Fedei-alism that the Colum- 
bia Broadca.sting System will run 
in Api-il. The.se forum-type broad- 
casts will be heard over a nation- 
wide hook-up. 

In February the Williams 'World 
Federalists conducted 16 speaking 
engagements, as a result of which 
they were instrumental in the es- 
tablishing of three new thapters. 
The month of February also added 
20 new names to their roster. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, AAARCH 9, 1949 



*"?*«F= 



f tre Bflligttg }gU^4 



V North Adams, Mossachusetts 



Williomstown, Mossachusetts 



"Er>(*red os second-class matter November 27, 1944, ot thi ^JOst office at 
North ^^doms, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
M'SKer, %amb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5^0Q 
per yeor. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williomstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 Editor 

Herberts Mohring^SO ^o/loging Editors 



Letters To The Editor 



News Editor 



Norman S. Wood ' 

Philip S. Collins '50 .\ _ _^ 

Lansing G.Scofield '50 Sp„^,^ Eji,„,^ 

Wolter P. Stern 50 ., - 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Associate Ej^itors: 1950- H. Baker, M. Behre, S. Blasche, K. F. X. Delony, 
J. Gibson, E. Gouinlock. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D, Ruder, F. Wiseman, 
R. Hastings. 1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Maclay, H. Pickord, 
' . E. Schur,. W. Widing. > 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 ): n..cj„=o. u, „.. 

-^ . , p. ,, ,cn — - Business Manager 

caword L. Stockhouse 50 

Harry Frozier, III '51 Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Gorfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Gonyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moir, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hotch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W, Thomas. 



Fraternities and Scholai^ship 



To the Editor of the Wlliams Record: 



i^was extremely interested In Fred Rudolph's letter^ (Feb. 26) 
In which" lie asked that the Williams fraternity syst^ be analyzed 
in terms of its place in the educational pattern at/Willlams. 

I was equally glad to see that the same ^ue of the RECORD 
contained a partial analysis along those lines. Twelve of the fifteen 
fraternities took their places, in the Williams educational picture 
below the college average.' AH of UtiefA took their places behind the 
Oarfleld Club. I think Fred has hls,^ui^wM:. 

New Haven, Conn. 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

/> RESCRimON OPTICIAN 



Courteous, afficient 

and prompt 

repoir sarvica 




Norman Redlich '47 



March 2,1949 
ED-: Reader Redlich 



Volume XLin 



MARCH 9. 1949 



Number 2 



Academic Freedom 

The dismissal of three professors from the University/^f Wash 
ington for membership In the Communist Party a month-and-a 
half ago set off a storm that hasn't subsided yet in either educational 
circles or In the press. Suspected or known Commimfsts had been dis- 
charged in the past — at Olivet College in Jktichigan a full-scale 
purge had made freedom meaningless, bu^/'some cover-up reason 
was always given. 

The Washington dismissals seem to' have been the showdown on 
the question, Is membership in the Communist Party sufficient 
reason for firing a professor witlr tenure? Dr. Raymond B. Allen said 
It was, that it made a teachpJ^ unfit for the search for the truth. 
In spite of the fact that ohe hundred members of the faculties of 
Amherst, Mount Holyoke; Smith, and Springfield Colleges and the 
University of Massachusetts together sent a protest to the Univer- 
sity, as did numerolis other groups; a majority ot college presidents 
and of the public were found to support this kind of action — so 
long as a professor is an avowed Communist Party member and not 
simply a radical or Socialist with views which differ from the ma- 
jority. / 

Party Membership 

CP member is necessarily committed to the overthrow of our 
tree institutions, by force; if necessaiT. And in accepting mem- 
bership he is necessarily sacrificing any free Investigation on his 
part to the uncompromising demands of a party line. A true Com- 
munist accepts, willingly, the fact that his future opinions cannot 
vary from those of a few men in party headquarters. When he 
disagrees he is expelled from the party. His research is not free, 
for its result is predetermined. That, ipso facto, makes a man unfit 
to teach in our colleges. 

Academic freedom is not unlimited license. To allow an avowed 
Communist to teach would undermine the ends which academic 
freedom is designed to attain, i.e. free inquiry. Freedom is not only 
a group of rights. It also imposes one duty, one law: to maintain 
those conditions under which freedom is possible. It is this duty that 
a COhimunlst Party member Violates, and in so doing he repudiates 
any right he may have had to free expression on our lecture platforms. 

But this is an extremely dangerous line to draw. What about 
those who are not actually party members, but who nevertheless seem 
to follow the party line? They have not pledged themselves to the 
overthrow of our free institutions nor have they committed them- 
selves in advance to an unconditional party line, whatever it may 
be. What about the two Oregon State University professors who wert 
fired two weeks ago, one for following the Moscow line to the extent 
of supporting the genetics teachings of the Russian Communist 
Lysenko in spite of "all the weight of evidence against it"? Dr. A. L. 
Strands, president of Oregon State said that such a professor "is 
not much of a scientist or has lost the freedom that an instructor 
or investigator should possess. " We know nothing about Lysenko's 
genetics nor about the professor's standing on his campus, so we 
can't commit ourselves in this particular case, nor, for that matter, 
in any particular, case about which we do not have first hand 
knowledge. But it would seem obvious that Dr. Strands is skating 
on extremely thin ice, and especially so since the decision to dismiss 
the two professors was made solely by him, and not by a faculty 
committee as was the case at the University of Washington. In such 
a one-man decision there is too much opportunity for personal in- 
tolerance. 

No Evidence 

These teachers, although radicals, were not subject to the iron 
hand of party discipline, and therefore there is no evidence that they 
had surrendered their privilege — tnd duty — to free inquiry. They 
ought to be Judged on their professional competence and not on their 
Red leanings. In order to assure this kind of impartial judgment, 
the decision to dismiss a professor should be made by a vote of his 
colleagues. In this respect we agree with Sidney HOok, who wrote in 
last week's New York "Times" Magazine: "I am confident that if the 
execution of the policy were left to university faculties themselves, 
and not to administrators and trustees who are harried by pressure 
groups, there would be little ground for complaint. In the last analy- 
sis there is no safer depository of the integrity of teaching and 
scholarship than the dedicated men and women who constitute the 
faculties of our colleges and universities." 

In a few Instances a radical teacher of this sort may do harm, 
but in many Insttances he is more effective In stimulating thought 
than is the man who professes to teach what he thinks is "pure 
Americanism." Such, we feel, is the case with Professor Schuman, 
who was the subject of an alumni attack last year. But If any of 
these radicals do cause some harm. It Is incomparably less than the 
harm that would result from any widespread purge. Academic fre«- 
doin Is a term that must continue to have real meaning U the Amer- 
ican student is to escape the fate of political indoctrlnfttlon. 



operating on the assunititi^n that high 
scholarship is the epltbmy of the college man. We feel th^ frater- 
nities contribute sohiething more than scholarship — an Intangible 
often called good character. ^s 



Sportsmanship 



To/the Editor of tlie Williams Record: 

In the March 2 issue of the RECORD Steve Blaschke condemns 
Yale's full court press with a 36 point advantage as unsportsman- 
like. We feel that his criticism of Howard Hobson's sportsmanship 
is unfounded. Any legal type of play that wins games is good, sports- 
manlike basketball. Basketball is a game with no quarter given or 
asked. 
March 3, 1949 R. R. Jeffrey '52 

D. B. Hastings '52 

O. H. Martin '52 

ED: Yale coach Hobson's use of the press was deplored because the 
game had been won beyond any doubt nd the press merely resulted 
in piling up an unnecessarily humiliating score. That Hobson's 
decision was questionable is substantiated by the fact that Hobson 
himself felt the necessity of writing a letter to Coach Dale Burnett 
attempting to Justify this strange use of the press in terms of Lavelli's 
scoring record and the desire of New Haven fans to see Lavelli score. 
To RECORD writer Blaschke this was not sufficient grounds for use 
of the press and therefore resulted in his charge that Hobson's con 
duct was not good sportmanship. 

Even more devastating evidence for this charge is withheld by 
request of Coach Burnett because of the personal nature of Hof 
son's letter. 

^^ 



this 



Pooh Stuff 



To the Editor of the Williams Record: 

Pooh lovers everywhere the Record circulates are shocked at 
the Ignorance you display in your February 23 Issue — the word 
is P-O-O-H! Tsk! 

Rosemary Hall Franny Chaffee 

Greenwich, Conn. 
"March 2, 1949 

Ed.: The lead paragraph of the Record writeup of the late house- 
party read: ' "Oh my," said Poo ruefully, "no more potted honey. . ." 
We profer our deepest apologies for this inexcusable lack of famil- 
iarity with A. A. Milne. The writer of the story will be horse whipped 
as soon as he comes out of hiding. 



Williams Warblers Wine, Win, 
WaltzWillowyWiUardWomen 



The Emma Willard School, 
scene of the much publicised trip 
through the faculty wine cellar 
last year by J. T. 8. Horton of 
RECORD fame, played host to the 
Williams Olee Club again Satur- 
day night. The club, warned in 
advance about the barbed wire 
entanglements, searchlights, ma- 
chine guns and electrified fence 
surrounding the Troy equivalent 
of Alcatraz were unprepared for 
the biggest surprise of the evening 
- - - Grade. 

An Emma Willard tradition, 
with flowing white hair and pince- 
nez glasses, Oracle passes her days 
playing the piano in the girls' 
gym classes while they do cal- 
isthenics to her music. This ar- 
rangement Cunderstood to be un- 
der consideration by the Williams 
Athletic Department for use here 
during Spring football practise) 
probably goes a long way towards 
developing some sort of coordina- 
tion, social grace or something. 
Anyway, the gusto which Oracle 
puts Into her gymiiEtslura playing 
was fully displayed over the week- 
end, first at the concert and later 
it the dance. 

Klelf-Liglited Room 

All this time, the Social Com- 
mittee of Emma Willard stood in 
a far comer of the klelg-Ughted 
room, glumly waiting for Grade 
to cease and desist so that they 
could play records for the dancing. 
Anally, Oracle paused, looking 
fofsome other music, or perhaps 
to catch her bred th. The Social 
Committee seized the opportunity, 
slapped a record Into the player 



iLhci r;k,.. 



and gave It a whirl. Grade bided 
her time; as soon as Crosby stop- 
ped crooning, she began again. 
After some minutes of this see- 
saw battle for musical supremacy, 
I at times both Oracle and the 
records were going at once), 
Oracle sponsored a bit of the Vir- 
ginia Reel, having discerned that 
the record player had no suitable 
music and would have to give in. 
Peeling was running high between 
Grade and the committee, but the 
4,704 chaperones for the occasion 
merely sat, moodily survaying the 
dancing couples. 

Faculty Wine Cellar 
An attempt by a number of 
couples to find the faculty wine 
cellar, scene of some extra-curric- 
ular activity last year, was un- 
successful. J. T. S. Horton claimed 
that he had been shown the wine 
cellar, and that it had been the 
scene of his downfall. There, he 
said, he had become at last a full 

fledged "Gay Dog,"- 

One Williams man claimed that 
he had been shown the secret 
.passage to RPI, nearest source of 
|men, but otherwise, he said that 
jhls two liour tour of the school 

'with his date had had no results, 

|-— . 

jLightweights • • • 

minutes, t^entyflve seconds, 
lack Ordeman's final victory at 
Unlimited clinched the meet. The 
lecision was won 10-3 with eight 
>f Ordeman's points coming In 
he last period. 



rs 



Frank Provanc.htr, f ropriator 
2nd Floor Kimball iMg. ; - ^iMh Adiomi 



HOPKINS 

FURNITURE 
, STORE 

pHrnithlngt for all tha room 

a Unfinithad Book Catai $5.50 

a Room Haotar with built-in fan $11.00 

a Univartol Elactrie Blonkatt $34.50 

a Extantion Clotat Sort $ .49 

a 6 Tuba Notional Union Radio $21.50 

a Naw Pottarn Popar Dropas $ .98 

\ a Lorga Siia Clotat Hooks $ .18 

' "•'■k 

S^ng Williams Man Sinca 1888 




ARROW 

SHIRTS and TIES 
UNDERWEAR • HANDKERCHIEFS • SPORTS SHIRTS 

S: 




THE WILLIAMS. RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1949 



Berry^s Shot Trips Ephs For Amherst, 50-49 



Second Round 
Fatal To Eph 
Squash Stars 

Three Survive Opening 

Round; Racquetmen 

Tangle In Tourney 

Four Purple squash stars 
matched strokes with top seeded 
players from sixteen colleges and 
universities In the 1949 National 
Intercollegiate Squash Singles 
Tournament held at Princeton 
last weekend. Williams represent- 
atives BUI Mlkell, George MuUer, 
and Jerry Dresser dll managed to 
win first round matches but ran 
Into tougher opposition In second 
bracket competition and were el- 
iminated. Number one singles 
player for the Purple, Rich Al- 
len, was not quite so lucky, losing 
to Hugh Foster of Harvard In a 
first round match. 

Hi(b Caliber Play 

Playing In a tournament in 
which, according to Coach Clar- 
ence Chaffee, "the caliber of play 
was much higher than last year," 
the Ephmen made a fine showing 
In spite of their early elimina- 
tions. Oeorge Muller easily won 
his opening match, eliminating 
Tift, Navy's number four man. In 
three quick games. Displaying as 
fine a brand of shots as he has 
Stu>wn all season, Oeorge kept the 
Mldahipman on the run through- 
out tifie^three games and handily 
advanceo'to second round play. 
Bill Mlkell Was equally as dazzl- 
ing In quickly debating his open- 
ing opponent, 3-0. Dresser of Wil- 
liams had the dlstincbon pf Ideat- 
ing Bo Calloway of Armyx3-2 in 
his first match. This was Swjet 
revenge for the Eph player, fbr, 
Calloway had previously beaten 
him by an Identical 3-2 score 
at Army. Rich Allen ran into 
much publicized Hugh Poster of 
Harvard in his opener, and the 
Crimson star walked off with a 
close match In four games. 
Second Round Fatal 

The three survivors ran into a 
second round Jinx at Princeton, 
and three close sets proved the 
downfall of the BlllvlUe entry. 
Muller faced off against Am- 
herst's second seeded player, 
Owens, and although it was nip 
and tuck all the way, the Jeff en- 
try eventually won out, 3-1. 
Oeorge took the first game hand- 
See SECOND, Page 4 . 



Eph Yearlings 
Fall To Jeffs 

Amherst Height 
Fatal To Locals 



Following a disastrous third 
quarter In which they were out- 
scored to the tune of 18-2, the 
Williams freshman basketball 
squad scattered before the on- 
rushlng Jeffmen of Amherst and 
succumbed by a final count of 
56-38, 

As the second half openedt ,he 
Purple yearlings came on the 
court trailing by three points, 26- 
23. Pete Smith. Williams guard, 
missed a foul shot and the roof 
fell in. Past-breaking and hard- 
driving all over the floor, Am- 
herst tallied fifteen consecutive 
points before the Ephmen could 
break into the scoring column. 
Cramer Scores 

Nor could Williams seem to do 
anything right. Not until seven 
minutes of the quarter had elap- 
sed was the Purple able to count- 
er. At this point Paul Cramer 
drove in hard and sank a right- 
handed hook shot. 
Not until midway In the final per- 
iod were the Ephmen able to 
crack the Jeff's defense. Then the 
Williams second string managed 
to tally ten straight points against 
a visibly tiring Amherst five, 
which had played the entire game 
with only minor substitutions. 
Height Disadvantage 

The first half started off un- 
favorably for the Purple, but 
thanks largely to the sharpshoot- 
ing of Cramer and Kulsar and 
good work under the boards by 
Smith and Kulsar, they managed 
to stay in the game. 

Nor was Williams all to blame 
for their fiasco In the third quar- 
"ter. As has be^n the story all sea- 
son, ^ey were hampered by a de- 
cided height disadvantage. Thus 
Coach Bobby Coombs' yearling 
quintet endeo^^heir '48- '49 sea- 
son with a won-lost record of two 
and four. 



Horsemen Bow 
To GeorgetVn 

Closed Indoor Season 
At Newark Saturday 

Saturday night, in the last 
game of the Indoor season, the 
Williams Polo Team was defeat- 
ed by Oeorgetown University 11- 
9. The match was played in the 
Essex Troop Armory in Newark, 
N.J. before a crowd of approxi- 
mately 500. This loss to Oeorge- 
town eliminates Williams from 
the Intercollegiate Indoor Polo 
Tournament. 

Georgetown's six goals In the 
first chucker provided them with 
an early lead which Williams was 
never able to overcome. During 
the first half the WiUiapis team 
was sparked by Vic Heerman 
who scored four goals in the first 
two chuckers. In the second half 
Bill Hudson came to the fore with 
the tallying of four goals. Scor- 
ing one goal in the last half, Sam 
Cook played good polo throughout 
the match. As the match progres- 
sed, Williams' play Improved. 
Whereas Georgetown scored nine 
goals in the first two chuckers, 
they were only able to score two 
In the third chucker and none In 
the last. It might be noted that 
the Williams team was outmount- 
ed which accounts partially for 
their slow start. The game was 
marred by one spill taken by 
Bill Hudson; however, he was not 
injured. 

Saturday's game gave the Wil- 
liams Polo Team a record of three 
wins and three losses for the In- 
door season. The victories were 
over Harvard, Yale J.V., and 
Princeton, while defeats were 
suffered from Cornell twice and 
Georgetown once. 



Jeflfs Splash 



Purple Frosh 

Dunk Muirmen, 39-36; 
Swipe League Crowii 



Amherst's yearling swimmers 
dethroned the Purple as Little 
Three champs for the first time 
since 1943 when they edged out 
Bob Muir's squad here Saturday 
afternoon, 39-36. Owen Sutton 
copped firsts for the Ephmen In 
the 50 and 100 yd. free style e- 
vents, but Amherst's Geithner 
matched his performance by win- 
ning both the 220 and 440 yd. 
free style, the former in the fine 
time of 2:26.4. 

John Montgomery's five points 
in the dive and seconds by John 
Belash in the 220 and 440 helped 
the Ephmen on to what might 
easily have been a triumph. Tenny 
Schad missed taking second In 
the 50 by a hair, and Ed Chaste- 
ney was a close third in the 100; a 
second In either of these events 
would have left the Jeffs on the 
short end of a 38-37 score. 

Lose Medley 

Victory In the medley relay 
would also have given the meet 
to the Muirmen, but they were 
nipped by half a body length 
desplt^ Rick Jeffrey's impressive 
1:08.1 In the breaststroke. Jock 
Lane placed second in the 220 yd. 
breast with Jeffrey taking third, 
while Ted Garfield and Archie 
Beard took thirds in the dive and 
150 yd. back respectively, to keep 
the Purple's hopes alive. How- 
ever, Amherst clinched the meet 
in the 440, nullifying the home 
team's triumph in the 400 yd. re- 
lay with Sutton, Schad, Chaste- 
ney, and Belash. 



LESS 
COST 

Mori- fuii'S fii'f Htiy 

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Mile Relay 
Cops Third 

Loses To CCNY 
In K Of C Meet 



Drawing the outside lane, the 
Williams mile-relay team could 
never get started, and finished 
third in the Knights of Columbus 
mile-relay held at Madison Square 
Garden in New York City Satur- 
day night. 

CCNY won the race in the fast 
time of 3.26.0, closely followed by 
Rhode Island State. The Ephmen 
turned in a 3:29.0 clocking in gar- 
nering third place. They, in turn, 
beat out St. John's and Boston 
College, who finished fourth and 
fifth respectively. 

Delaney Does 51 Flat 

The team was rUnning in last 
or next to last place most of the 
way, but anchor-man Kev Del- 
aney turned in a blazing 51 flat 
last quarter to move Williams up 
past St. Johns into third place. 

Co-captain Bill Barney, lead- 
ing off for the Ephmen, drew the 
outside lane, and consequently 
had to run most of the race a- 
round the outside of the track, 
coming in fourth place. Walt Zie- 
genhals, running second, and Co- 
captain Gordy Smith, running 
third, kept the Ephs in the race, 
but the team still was in fourth 
place when Delaney took the Ba- 
ton. Delaney's last sprint gave 
Williams a third place in the fi- 
nal standing. 

Two Firsts „ 

So far this season, Williams 
has run third behind Amherst 
and Wejleyan in a Little Three 
mile relay, but then come back to 
cop first places in the Milrose 
meet and the AAU meet. The 
third place in the K. of C. meet 
thus puts the season record at 
two and three. 

The mile relay team may travel 
to Cleveland this coming Satur- 
day to compete in the Cleveland 
Knights of Columbus meet. If 
they do, they will be running a- 
gainst some of the mid-west's best 
teams, such as Michigan State 
and Baldwin Wallace. 



Defeat Baeks^ 
Wesmen Into 
Second Crown 



Larson High For Ephs; 

Injury Stops Mason 

In Last College Tilt 



By Steve Blaschke 

An unknown Amherst forward 
named Ned Berry took only one 
shot in last Saturday's ball- 
game, but it was all that was 
needed to give the Jeffs a 50-49 
victory because Berry's swishing 
25 foot set came with but 'seven 
seconds remaining and Williams 
leading by a single point. To Wes- 
leyan fans this shot meant an- 
other Little Three championship, 
to Amherst fans it was a thrilling 
last second victory but to Dale 
Burnett and his game, hard- 
fighting young ballclub it only 
meant a heartbreaking end for a 
tough season and for Captain 
Jack Mason's and Jerry Page's 
last collegiate ballgame. 

It might well be said that two 
long sets have deprived the Purple 
of the Little Three crown because 
Wenner's last minute set staved 
off an upset win by Amherst over 
the Cardinals while Berry's set 
ended Williams' chances for a 
I 'first place tie. 

Pusey opened the scoring with 
two foulshots but Bob Chambe'r- 
lain tied it up almost immediately 
and the ballgame seesawed back 
and fourth until Amherst led 14- 
13 at the twelve minute mark. 
Praser entered the ballgame at 
this point, took two setshots and 
the Purple had a 17-14 lead. 
Williams Takes Lead 

However, Amherst's Chamber- 
lain got hot and the Jeffs lead 
26-21 at half-time. They kept this 
edge early in the second half but 
with the score 37-31 Captain Ed 
Kelley fouled out, ending a long 
collegiate career which saw him 
play for both Amherst and Wil- 
liams. The Whistle tooters caught 
up with Jay Geraghty a few min- 
utes later and with Cool and Lar- 
son controlling the rebounds while 
Pi'aser scored on a lay-up and a 
foul, the Purple soon led 41-38. 

The whistle began blowing a- 
See DEFEAT, Page 4 



•• - ..... ..r.raxyWv*'". switch V 



MOW MILD CAN A CIGARETTE BE ? 
WELL, SKITCH. THE CAMEL SO-DAV 
TEST CONVINCED ME TWAT CAMELS 
ARE THE MILDEST CIGARETTE 
iVe EVER smoked! 






t^Mn 



SMOKE CAMUS FOR 30 DAYS 
-and you'll know! 

la a recent coast-to^ast test of hundreds of 
rnSwo«enwho»nokedonlyCamelsfor 

?0 day.-an average of one to two pac^ a 
day- noted throat specialise, after ^.akTng 
^veekly examinations, reported 



IVE KNOWN THAT FOR YEARS, 
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OF THROAT IRRITATloil 



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ACdMlC 



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4 SHOWINGS 

LAWRENCE OLIVIER 

"HENRY V" 




9:30 A.M. — 2:30 P.M. 

5:30 P.M. — 8:30 P.M. 
First 3 Shawi — 90^ 
Evaning Show — $1.20 

c 

TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
IN ADVANCE 



!-■: 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, ANARCH 9, 1949 



Second • - 



Uy but then lost two close ones by 
one point margins.' Owens sewed 
up the verdict by taking game 
number four. 15-11. Bill Mikell 
suffered a similar fate, falling in 
four games ttf StlUson of Army. 
Jerry Dresser, equajlly as unlucky 
as his predecessors, also went 
down' by a 3-1 margin. His opp- 
onent was Prlncetdn's Babe Pear- 
soii. Pearson is the brother of for- 
mer national champion Stan 
Pearson, wh6 won the title in 
1940' while playing at Princeton. 
The match Was well played -from 
start to finish. 

Comments from the gallery; 
The Ephmen made a much more 
creditable showing than last year 
When only one player advanced 
past the first round . . . One of the 
closest and most fiercely contes- 
ted matches of the tournament 
waj) that between Salaun of Wes- 
leyan and Smith, Amherst's Soph- 
omore star. The Intercolle- 
giates marked the close of the 
season for Chaffee's boys and 
was the final bow for Senior 
squash players Frank Donnelly 
and Ggeorge Wright. 



Defeat • - • 




gain and within three minutes 
Pusey, Larson, and Fagerburg 
had to leave the game via the five 
foul route.In the meantime Mason 
twisted his ankle and had to leave 
the floor after having scored se- 
ven points and sparked the team 
brilliantly In his final ballgame. 
Larson Scores 1% 
With 65 seconds remaining, 
■Williams had a three point edge 
thanks to Ditmar's set and Pra- 
ser's free throw but Nesbitt scor- 
ed on an unbelievable jump-shot. 
The Purple started to freeze the 
ball but Amherst finally gained 
control on a held ball. Berry then 
took his shot and the gun sounded 
Ditmar's desperation shot rimmed 
the bucket and stubbornly refused 
to drop in. 

Dribbles . . . Larson was high with 
12 points, followed by Praser who 
chipped in eight in his finest per- 
formance to date . . . Jerry Page 
ended his collegiate career by 
sinking an all important foulshot 
late in the ballgame... Ditmar, 
who played a beautiful floorgame, 
was the only regular who did not 
foul out or get injured. . .Bemeas- 
led Harry Sheehy's six foot six 
were badly missed under the 
boards. 

The Summary: 

Williams 



Elections 



NOW PtAYING 



' WEDNESDAY to SATURDAY 
\ 
GALLANT BLADE 

1-.. 

Lcirry Porks 
Marguerite Chapman 



TRIPLE THREAT 

with 

Football's Greatest 

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Evenings continuous from 6:30 pm 



ENDS WEDNESDAY 

Joan Fontaine - Louis Jourdan 

LETTER FROM AN 
UNKNOWN WOMAN 



THURSDAY 

Lawrence Olivier 

HENRY V 

see ad on page 3 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Glenn Ford - Terry Moore 

RETURN OF OCTOBER 



as college holidays next year. Bojh 
are Saturdays after formal dances 
on houseparty weekends, one fall- 
ing on October 30. the Union 
weekend, and the other on May 9. 
Dean Brooks mentioned the fact 
that the Bowdoin Plan, which 
helps foreign students at Williams 
would have to be discussed short- 
ly, in order to determine whether 
the Plan ' should be continued 
He also proposed, for discussion 
at a later meeting, the adoption 
of a sticker system to control the 
automobile problem at Williams. 
Several other colleges have suc- 
cessfully used such a system to 
Indicate who has permission to 
own and operate a car. 

Henry Strong '49 finished his 
term as President with a letter 
to the Dartmouth Student Gov- 
ernment and with the reading of 
a report from the Purple Key. 
The letter to Dartmouth asked 
for any possible help or cooper- 
ation in locating the missing ar- 
ticles of the recent houseparty. 

The report from the Purple Key 
listed its accomplishments during 
the last term. Among them were: 
a beniflt dance for -the football 
training table, the fall smoker, 
improved athletic letters and cer- 
tificates, hanging of pictures in 
Lasell gym. and Amherst and 
Wesleyan movies in AMT. 



Larson, f 
Page 
Mason, f 
Bush 
Pusey>^ 
Cool ""^\^ 
Ditmar. g 
Fraser / 
Fagerburg, g 

Totals 



5 

2 


1 
2 

3 
3 
3^. 



P 
2 
1 
3 




19 



11 4& 



AMT -- 



imaginative yet simple with sev- 
eral unit backdrop pieces to fa- 
cilitate changes. 

A major disappointment to all 
concerned with the construction 
and designing of the show occur- 
red when the theatre was forced 
to turn down an offer from Osca 
Hammerstein for the sets from 
his hit show "Annie Get Your 
Gun" w!;ich closed on Broadv.'ay 
last month after a run of several 
years. These sets and act curtains 
would have proved invaluable to 
this and other shows to come for 
years. Although Mr. Hammerstein 
offered the sets free to the thea 
tre, the cost of transporting them 
from New York at union wages 
was too great for the offer to be 
accepted. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



J. I'aiil Shoedy* Swildied lo Wildroot €reani-Oil 
Beraii.se He Flunked The Finger-Nail Tesl 




IF PiOPLI are whiskering about you, better check up on your 
. hair. Before J.P. switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil hair tonic, 
he was wide open for all kinds of catty remarks about his ratty 
appearance. Not so today I Now that he's using Wildroot 
Cream-Oil regularly, annoying- dryness and loose, ugly dan- 
' druff arrf gone. His hair stays put all day. He can pass the 
Wildroot Finger-Nail Test without batting an eye. 

J.P. 's experience leads us to suggest that you try non-alcoholic 

^ Wildroot Cream-Oil containing Lanolin, too. Get yourself a 

bottle or tube today at your drug or toilet goods counter. 

And, have your barber give you professional applications. 

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Mermen 



nipped Amherst's George Conant 
rot third by a quarter of a point. 
SumAiai;^: 300 medley relay - won 

by WllUamOwineman, ^venson 
Murray). tlme'Silh.l (College re- 
cord); 220 - won^^Baldwin (W) 
Stevenson (A), Williams >A). time 
2:20.2 50 - won by Rueckert>W), 
Brashears iW), Keydel (A), tlmeV 
:25.0; Dive - won by Pulton (A), 
Stowers iW), Sperry (W), 83.83 
points; 100 - won by Coale (W), 
Schlangen (A), Purdy (A), Time 
:57.6; 150 back - won by Wineman 
(W). Lammot <W), Epstein (A), 
time, 1:37.3; 200 breast - won by 
Svenson (W), Hlller (A), Snyder 
iW), time, 2:37.6; 440 - won by 
Reid (W), Lambert (W), Steven- 
son I A), time, 4:56.0; 400 Iree re- 
lay - won by Williams (Murray. 
Brashears, Eueckert, Baldwin ) , 
time, 3:39.8. 



Long Speaks On Goethe ' 
At Faculty Lecture 



Professor O. W. Long will de- 
liver an address entitled "Goethe 
After Two Centuries" at the fac- 
ulty lecture tomorrow at 4:30 pm 
In the chemistry building. 

This leture is being presented 
4^1 connection with the world- 
wide celebrations of the two hun- 
dredth anniversary of Goethe's 
birth. On April 18th Professor 
Long will present^t>tie first in a 
series of three lectures^ tO,,be held 
at Princeton in commemoration of 
this German philosopher arid 
poet. 



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Volume XLIII, Number 3 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3R^^0fj&^ 



SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1949 



Price 1 cents 




, Swimmers Defend Titles 



Baxter Talks 
At Ny Dinner 



500 Alumni Meet 
At WillianiH Club 



Undefeated Matmen Prime 
For NE Tournament Today 

At Spi-lngfleld College today the New Engllftl Intercollegiate 
Wrestling Meet will move into Ihg final round. In ^gndlng its title, 
and the Rockwell Cup, the Williams team opposes sl(ferf)ther entries, 
Amherst, Wesleyan, Coast Guard Academy, MIT, TufSKWid Spring- 
field, in the Friday and Saturday contests, *• \X 

Fi-lday afternoon the preliminary bouts are run off. X^ victors 
in these meet in semi-finals that evening with the two flnalh^ s com- 
peting Saturday aftemopn. «{ 

In dual meets this season the^. 
Ephs have met and defeated aU 
but the Springfield and MIT 
teams. Of the latter, little is exp- 
ected on the basis of a mediocre 
showing so far this year. Their 
Unlimited entry, Lars Soderberg, 
however, rightly constitutes their 
main hope for taking a first 
Springfield, on the other hand, 
has a well-balanced team. Their 
121 lb. wrestler, Joe Ouschke, will 
probably claim that event and it's 
likely they'll have at least two fi- 
nalists. 

Eph Strencth Distributed 

The Williams team will be at 
full strength this week-end and 
its hopes for success lie in the 
well-distributed power. Bill Kel- 
ton Is at 121 lbs.. Captain Paul 
Cook will defend his title at 128 
lbs. The other Williams entries 
are Scrubby Perry, Paul Rhorb, 
Green Carleton, Bill Leitlinger, 
Pete Smythe, and John Stillwell 

The results of ^ts successful 
season give reason to believe the 
Williams squad will place in most 
of the weight classes. In such a 
tournament, however, little pre- 
diction is possible for the overall 
team results. 

Freshmen Also Bid 

The Freshmen tournament will 
be run simultaneously on both 
days. The field is smaller for the 
cubs as Amherst is not competinR 
and the entrance of Coast Guard 
U not likely. Wesleyan. TufUs. 
Springfield and MIT will be con- 
tending; only one of the.se team.s, 
the Cardinals, have been matched 
In a dual meet with the Eph year- 
lings. 

Comprising the Williams line- 
up are: Aaron Katcher, Fred Pew, 
Fred Toppan, Tom Evans. Bill 
Callaghan, Jim Shanahan, Bill 
Simpson, and Jack Ordeman. 



ProfCaponigri 
Gives Lecture 



Heads Paper On New 
Philosophy Of History 



Alex Chapman 
Speaks On Oil 

Stresses Foreign Jobs 
In Petroleum Industry 



World Gov't 
Not Feasible 



Prof. Newhall Outlines 
DifTiculties Of Plan 



Decrying the "unite or die " at- 
titude of advocates of world gov- 
ernment. Professor Richard A. 
Newhall spoke on "The Case A- 
galnst World Government' in a 
lecture sponsored by the Inter- 
national Relations Club last Mon- 
day evening In Griffin Hall. 

Although he admitted the pos- 
sibility of ultimate desireabllity 
of a world government. Professor 
Newhall stressed that this was 
"not the right time." Unsure of 
the feasibility of such a program 
at this moment, he pointed out 
that such a movement needs con- 
siderably more popular support. 
Tendency Toward Disunity 

Likewise, Professor Newhall em- 
phasized that our world commun- 
ity Is not united, but rather that 
the tendency today was toward 
disunity. One factor contributing 
toward this trend Is the growth 
of nationalism not only in Rus- 
sia, but also In the United States 
World government, he stated, Is 
the culmination of a trend, not 
the beginning of one. 

Nor did he believe that a world 
government could be established 



Over 500 alumni and friends of 
the College gathered at the Wil- 
liams Club in New York City 
Thursday evening for the annual 
Williams Dinner. President James 
P. Baxter III 14 and Brigadier 
General Telford Taylor 28 head- 
ed the list of speakers, witli 
Charles D. Makepeace 00, treas- 
urer of the College, servinu as 
toastmaster. 

President Baxter also gave his 
annual report on the CoUeye to 
the assembled alumni, announc- 
ing that the' Building and Endow- 
ment Fund Drive has reached 
$1,577,754 as of February 28. In 
addition to this sum, he reported 
an anonymous gift of $70,000 
conditional upon the campaign's 
ceaching Jts n<^!il nf .«'.> son pon hu. 
the end of 1949. 

Of the 6,350 living Williams al- 
umni, including non-graduate 
donors, 3,078 haxl contributed to 
the Drive by the end of last month 
This amounts to 485 per cent par- 
ticipation, and represents an in- 
crease of 13.5 per cent in eight 
months. 

Sees Eventual War 

The total contributions to date 
are divided as follows: non-alum- 
ni faculty, $3,317; students last 
spring, $8,106: pai-enls, $83,452: 
other friends, $86,790; and alum- 
ni, $1,396,089. In the alumni cat- 
egory, the Class of 1924 is lead- 
ing the field with 90 per cent of 
its living membeis having con- 
tributed. 

"In running a college it is nec- 
essary to take account of the 
needs both of the present genera- 
tion of students and the esti- 
mated needs of at least the next 
two generations," President Bax- 
ter noted in a brief talk. "We arc 
now in a cold war with Russia 
that, more likely than not, will 
eventuate some, day in a shooting 
war. The best chance we have of 
escaping war without sacrificing 
See BAXTER, Page 2 



The need for a rapprochement 
between philosophy and history In 
modern thought was expressed 
last Tuesday night by A. Robert 
Caponigri of Notre Dame in a pa- 
per entitled "The Philosophical 
Problem of History." The lecture 
was presented to a large audience 
'In Griffin Hall under the auspices 
of the Philosophical Union. 

The demand for a revision of 
this ^Relationship, amounting, ac 
coi'dlii^.^ to Mr. Caponigri, to a 
possiblev.' 'revolution, is due to dis 
dain and .''mbiguity on the part of 
philosophy ji the past. It is based 
on the conflict resulting from 
philosophy's tendency toward ab- 
stractions and generalizations, 
and history's concern with the 
particular and the phenomeiio- 
logical. 

Fallacy of Reduction 
Mr. Caponigri stated that the at- 
tempt of philosophy to reduce his- 
tory to the abstract follows along 
two fallacious lines, one in the di- 
rection of nature and the other in 
the direction of spirit. The pro- 
blem arises at the point where 
history, as a region of meaning 
in epistomology, can surrender 
neither its status as an art nor as 
a science, and yet cannot logi- 
cally claim both. 

The answer, Mr. Caponigri be- 
See PHIL, Page 4 



Yacht Club Plans 
Spring Activities 

To Race Three Boats ; 
Hope To Buy Fourth 



Bonanza Sets 
New Record 



. . An interesting outline of the 
Petroleum Industry and the op- 
portunities for a graduate's en- 
trance into this field was given 
Monday night by Alex Chapman, 
Williams '22, at the Sigma Phi 
house. This address by Mr. Chap- 
man, who is connected with the 
Arabian-American Oil Company, 
was one of the regular Vocational 
Guidance Lectures sponsored by 
the Placement Bureau. 
,In talking of the petroleum in- 
dustry as a whole, Mr Chapman 
strongly recommended that the 
undei'graduate seriously consider 
this field for his future vocation. 
He not only termed the field "ex- 
citing" and "a he-man's game", 
but he also mentioned that the oil 
industry is one of the most rap- 
idly expanding in the world. With 
in the industry itself, he stated 
that there are jobs available for 
chemistry, econimics, engineering, 
and geology majors. Mr. Chap- 
man advised however, that the 
student specialize for one year af- 
ter college. 

Oil Abroad 
Because of the decreasing sup- 
ply of oil in the United States, 
the American oil companies have 
been forced to seek this "black 
gold" abroad. Last year was the 
first year that the United States 
became a net-importer of oil. In 
turning to loreign countries toi- 
oil, the American companies have 
been expecially interested in the 
See CHAPMAN, Page 4 



Muirmen Attempt To Take 
Sixth New England Crown 

by Norm Wood 

Leveling their sights on a sixth straight New England Inter- 
collegiate Swimming Association championship, Williams swimmers 
compete in the finals of the twenty-eighth NEISA meet at 2 p.m. 
this afternoon in Amherst's Pratt Pool 

It does not seem likely that any of the other twelve teams has 
the strength to snatch the crown from the Ephmen's hands. The 
team representing Williams today is approximately the same one that 
has triumphed for the past two years. 

;, •-• A bit of history of the New Eng- 

lands presents a clearer picture 



Cord Meyer 
Here Tuesday 

(JWF President 
To Give Lecture 



Williams Group Sees 

Teterboro Landing 



Spring racing plans and the 
possibilities of enlarging the Wil- 
liams Yacht Club's fleet of "Pen- 
guins" were discussed at an im- 
portant meeting of the Club 
Tuesday night. 

Commodore Bardes. '51, report- 
ed that the Club's third Penguin, 
purchased recently, would be 
painted and ready lor racing by 
the end of the Spring vacation. If 
adequate funds can be raised, the 
Club hopes to have four boats for 
the spring racing season. 



Douglas Burgoyene, '52, in 
by force. Today no state Is power- charge of commissioning the boats 



Taking off from Williamstown 
airport at 11:15 last Tuesday 
morning, the Nutmeg Airline flew 
three passengers to Teterboro, 
New Jersey in time to see Bill 
Odom set a new light plane dis- 
tance record of 5300 miles as he 
landed at the Jersey landing strip 
at 12:05, just thii'ty-six hours af- 
ter his departure from Honolulu. 

Piloted by Wallace Barnes '49, 
the Nutmeg Beechcraft Bonanza 
also carried Lynn Haskell, Bill 
Turner '49 and Bill Barney '49, 
RECORD reporter. The craft was 
Identical to tllat flown by Odom 
with the exception of wingtip gas 
tanks mounted on the record- 
breaking plane. 

Record Doubled 

The Honolulu-Teterboro flight 
set a new International straight- 
line distance standard for light- 
weight land planes. This broke a 
previous record of 2406 miles set 
by Odom on January 12-13 in a 
flight from Honolulu to Oakland, 
California in the same airplane — a 
Continental powered four-place 
Beechcraft Bonanza monoplane. 

Odom showed few signs of fa- 
tigue. For a full fifteen minutes 
after he landed, he was unable to 
step from the cockpit due to the 
presence on all sides of hundreds 
of officials, newspapermen, photo- 
graphers, radio announcers and 
spectators. Starting the Jaunt 
with 288 gallons of 80 octane 
gasoline, the veteran pilot used 
$76 worth of fuel and had 13 
gallons remaining In the tanks 
upon completion of the flight. 

Although not out to set any 
records himself, Barnes arrived 
in New Jersey 45 minutes after 
leaving Williamstown from Cole's 
Airport. He and his party made 
the return trip in less than an 
hour. Operated by Barnes and 
the Nutmeg Airline is 



Prof, Johnson 
Defends UN 

Disjjroves Of Alliance 

Of Western Nations 



"Will a union of the democracies 
now promote world peace?" was 
the topic discussed by a group of 
four men including Joseph E. 
Johnson, professor of history, on 
Town Meeting of the Air. Tuesday 
night over a national radio net- 
work. 

Clarence Streit, author of the 
book "Union Now", and Owen J. 
Roberts, former Associate Justice 
of the United States Supreme 
Court and present dean of the 
University of Pennsylvania law 
school, supported the pi'oposal for 
a federal union of the democra- 
cies. Professor Johnson contended 
that the United Nations affords 
the best method for insuring 
world peace and freedom. Edgar 
Ansel Mowrer, foreign correspon- 
dent and author, could agree with 
neither of these two views, seeing 
world peace possible only as the 
result of a federal world govern- 
ment. 

Supports UN 

In his talk Professor Johnson 
pointed out that a union of the 
democracies would wreck the UN. 
He said that the UN is "emphatic- 
ally not a failure" and that It is 
important because the United 
States and the Soviet Union both 
belong to it. A union of the demo- 
cracies would destroy the last 
bridge between east and west, and 
in doing this, create division ra- 
ther than promote peace ■and se- 
curity. 

Summing up his case for the 
UN, Professor Johnson suggested 
that in the UN we have the proper 
machinery for solving the crucial 
problems facing the world today. 
"Let's not abandon something 
good let's make it work," he 



Cord Meyer, Jr., president of the 
United World Federalists, will 
speak on the subject 'Peace or 
Anarchy" Tuesday evening, March 
15 at 8 p.m. in Chapin Hall. Mr. 
Meyer has gained national and 
intei-national recognition as an 
exponent of world federalism. 

During the United Nations Con- 
ference at San Francisco in 1945, 
he was the veteran's assistant to 
Harold. E. Stassen, one of the 
United States delegates. Since 
then he has devoted his time to 
furthering the cause of world fed- 
eral government in this country. 
He has written a number of mag- 
azine articles and the book "Peace 
or Anarchy." 

Marine Corps Veteran 

Mr. Meyer graduated from Yale 
University in 1942, Phi Beta 
Kappa and Summa Cum Lau4e. 
During the war, he served in the 
South Pacific as the leader of a 
Marine Corps machine gun pla- 
toon. He was decorated with the 
Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, 
and retired as a Captain in 1945. 

His magazine articles include 
contributions to "The Atlantic 
Monthly", "Vogue", "The Nation", 
'47, "The New Republic", "Scholas- 
tic Life" and "Presbyterian Life". 
His short story, "Waves of Dark- 
ness", published in "The Atlan- 
tic" won the O- Henry prize for 
the best first-published story of 
1946. 

' Writes Book 

Mr. Meyer wrote his book, 
"Peace or Anarchy" while study- 
ing at Harvard in 1946 on a Lowell 
Junior Fellowship. 

He was among the founders of 
the American Veterans Committee 
and served for two years as a 
member of its national Planning 
Committee. 

Under his leadership the Unit- 
ed World Federalists have grown 
to be the largest world govern- 
ment organization in the United 
States with 650 local chapters 
and 24 state branches. 



of just what they are. In October, 
1921, the NEISA was founded, 
made up of six charter members. 
Today there are thirteen colleges 
in the oi'ganization. Dartmouth, 
a charter member, withdrew, but 
the other colleges are all repre- 
sented this weekend. They are: 
Amherst, Boston University, Bow- 
doin. Brown, MIT, Springfield, 
Trinity, Tufts, University of Con- 
necticut, University of Massachu- 
setts, Weseleyan, Williams, and 
Worcester Tech. 

Williams has always done a 
creditable job in the New Eng- 
lands. Out of the twenty-seven 
meets, it has won seven, placed se- 
cond four times, third, six. 
Curtain-Baiser A Corker 
Today's performance should be 
the eighth victory for Williams 
teams. They have a wealth of 
strength in the relays, the dis- 
tances, and the backstroke, and 
will at least capture their share 
of points in the sprints. An anal- 
ysis of these generalizations shows 
the Ephmen's power. 

The first event, the 300 medley 
relay, .=hould be a tremendous 
rece. It's a toss-up between Brown 
and Williams. The Bruins' Ollle 
Patrell, Dune Gray, and Jim Mc- 
Kelvey are a rapid trio, but on 
the other hand. Williams' co-cap- 
tain Hank Wineman. Swede Sven- 
son, and Moe Murray have been 
shaving time off their record of 
late. Bowdoin, Springfield, and 
possibly Amherst should make 
their way into the finals. 

Shovr'ing in the Distances 
The final race, the 400 free- 
style relay, has a purple fiavor. 
The quartet of Murray, Chick 
Brashears, Bill Rueckert, and co- 
See Purple, Page 3 



Fourteen Affiliate 
With Fraternities 



Honor Society 
Chooses Six 

Phi Bete Membership 
Increased To Fifteen 



ful enough In resources or will called for volunteers to work on 
to carry out such a task. | the- dinghies for the next two 1 Turner, 

To Strengthen his argument a- I weeks. Both boats have already currently available for charter by I sa'tJ- "We must all hang togeth- 
See IRC, Page 4 ' been sanded. ' students er, or shaU we hang separately." 



Seven Houses Utilize 

Post-Season Rushing 



Post-season rushing ended last 
Monday with fourteen undergrad- 
uates affiliating themselves with 
seven fraternities. The fourteen 
new members going into the hous- 
es are: Chi Psl- Robert Butz '52. 
Paul Doyle '52, Lowell Mason '51, 
Charles Scholt2 '52, and John Syl- 
vester '52; Delta UpsUon- William 
Doherty '52; Phi Gamma Delta- 
Roger Dickinson '51; Phi Sigma 
Kappa- Kent Carson '52, arid 
Donald MacDonald '52; Theta 
Delta Chi- James Howe '52, Gra- 
ham Smith '52, and William Ste- 
vens '52; Saint Anthony's- John 
Ordeman '52; and Zeta Psi- Rich- 
mond Allen '61. 



Six new members were elected 
to the Williams chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa recently, swelling the 
undergraduate membership to fif- 
teen men. 

Men elected to the society must 
be in the upper one-fourteenth of 
their class. Those chosen in the 
spring of their Junior year or af- 
ter mid-year exams in their sen- 
ior year must have an average 
of at least 11 A's above B, while 
graduating seniors need an ave- 
rage of 8 A's above B. 

One man, Richard B. Bllder 
'49, was elected as of June, 1948. 
Others elected this February are: 

Kenneth H. Armstrong '49 

Andrew S. Biddle F-'50 

David M. Clarkson F-'50 

James H. Greer '49 

Harry C. McDaniel '49 



Coach Burnett Ouster 

Rumored On Campus 

Rumors from usually reliable 
campus sources have it that 
Ooach Dale Burnett's three- 
year contract will not- be re- 
newed when It expires this 
June. Jpe college Is looking 
for an experienced basketball 
coach who can also assist with 
football. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1949 



-f:- 



^tr« MiUi(|^§ l^eafi^ 



North AdomSj Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered os second-class matter November 27, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879" Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Mossachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.03 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Holl, Williamstown, Telephone 72. 



Volume XUII 



MARCH 12, 1949 



Number 3 



Telephones 



A RECORD Investigation of the methods used to defraud the 
telephone company, by making pennies and slugs work in the public 
telephones, has revealed corrective measures which can be taken and 
which will permit the re-installation of public telephones in all 
dorms, if students will cooperate. -> 

Lai^e quantities of pennies found in phones after each monthly 
CQllectloft and destructiQisr^of teleph«*B booths have necessitated 
the I'emoval «f four telephones this year, four last year, and a few 
in the years before that. At present there are no public telephones 
in Morgan, East, or Payerweather and only one in Sage and Lehman. 
This is the source of great inconvenience to every college activitj^ 
and to the administration, because it means that most students 
living in dormitories cannot be reached by phone except in their 
social units at meal time. This childishness inconveniences all stu- 
dents by overcrowding house telephone circuits. It is the cause be- 
hind that intermoinable busy signal that we all find so perturbing 
when trying to phone at lunchtime or suppertime. 

The RECORD investigation discloses that every phone that has 
had to be removed was an unattached booth, whereas the ones 
attached to walls in Berkshire and a few other scattered places 
have had many fewer pennies in their boxes. This is because a loose 
booth is susceptible to the "tipping" technique, a method of making 
pennies work which can be done quickly, easily, and which takes no 
skill whatsoever. In an unattached booth phone, anyone desiring 
to do so can defraud the telephone company. With such a multitude 
of offenders the disciplinary problem was an impossible one. 

Wall phones eliminate this easily practiced tipping technique 
and make the activity of defrauding the telephone company, which 
so many freshmen and sophomores seem to think is great fun, the 
work of what might be called "specialists" at two other techniques. 
The number of culprits is thus strictly limited, and the problem of 
singling out individuals upon whom to take disciplinary action is 
made much easier. * 

When presented with tiiese facts by the RECORD, Robert M.. 
Hodgson, manager of the North Adams telephone office, gladly con- 
sented to a plan which will permit the eventual re-installation of 
all public phones in the dorms, as long as the students continue 
to cooperate. Wall phones will be installed in Morgan and Entry B of 
Sage, places from which unattached booth phones were taken earlier 
in the year, on a one-month probation basis. If, after a month, the 
collections from these two phones are satisfactory, the other two 
phones removed this year will be replaced. 

Men in East and Fayerweather, where the phones were taken 
out in previous years, will have to wait until next year to have 
public service. At present all available circuits into those two dorms 
are used by private phones in the rooms- 
It must be emphasized that wall phones will not solve the entire 
problem. Action must be taken to assure disciplinary measures 
against any and all offenders. A specific provision prohibiting tam- 
pering with phones ought to be put into the Regulations of Williams 
College, The Disciplinary Committee ought to set and publicize a 
definite punishment for anyone convicted of defrauding the telephone 
company, JA's in the quad ought to be on the lookout for persons 
putting pennies in the phones and report them to the Discipline 
Committee, Finally, the force of public opinion ought to be brought 
to bear against those tew who, in the future, may be responsible 
for so greatly inconveniencing the many by making it necessary for 
the phone company to remove the public telephones again. 



Sondheim Interview 



When the Record interviewed Stephen Sondheim '50 this week, 
the author-composer of "Ail That Glitters" revealed the background 
of the musical show which will be produced on March 18, 19, 21, and 
22 at the Adams Memorial Theatre, Beginning with an explanation 
of the nature of his show, Sondheim spoke of the comparisons that 
will undoublably arise between "All That Glitters" and "Phinney's 
Rainbow," his popular musical of last year. In contrast to that 
show — a collection of songs tied together with an appealing plot 
line involving a burlesque of Williams institutions and campu^life, 
"All That Glitters" will be a "book" show, thereby placing the focal 
emphasis on story, characters, and plot rather than on songs. Even 
the shabby-wigged, heavily busted, hairy legged chorus line of "Phin- 
ney's Rainbow" Is gone with women being cast in female roles. 

Written Last Summer 

"All That Glitters" is a musical adaption of the George Kaufman 
and Marc Connelly hit "Beggar on Horseback," long a Sondheim 
favorite. After receiving permission from Kaufman to produce the 
play at Williams in musical form, Sondheim began the actual com- 
position while on a motor trip through the West last summer. By 
the beginning of the tali term he had completed his first draft 
which he submitted to the noted Oscar Hammerstein for approval. 
At this time Hammerstein made some helpful suggestions which 
were incorporated into the show. Later when Sondheim presented 
his second draft to the New York lyricist, Hammerstein "seemed to 
like it," It is hoped that Hammerstein and the other half of the 
famed Hammerstein-Rodgers team, Richard Rodgers, will be able 
to see the show in Williamstown since they will be in Boston., next 
weekend where their new production "South Pacific" is trying out. 
Sondheim also disclosed that he had written one of the songs in the 
score, "Dripk to Ze Moon, " in collaboration with Hammerstein's 
daughted, Alice, 

Songs Published 

Choosing "Beggar on Horseback" as a basis for this new musical 
_wfls perhaps his most difficult selection, but Sondheim was impressed 
by the fantasy, humor, expert characterizations, and what he terms 
"disparate unity" found in the Kaufman-Connelly script. Such "dis- 
parate unity" as applied to a show having both unified and episodic 
qualities, is a characteristic which lends Itself to a large score \^ith 
various types of songs. Of particular Interest to students is Sond- 
heim's disclosure that the Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI) has once 
again published a folio of songs from the show as was done with a 
few tunes from "Phinney's Rainbow". Included in the folio are five 
J, numbers from the score of thirteen songs. In discussing his methods 
[■ql composing, Sondheim revealed that he usually begins with a re- 
, frain line, fitting this to a musical motif and then completing the 
lyrics. He stressed the extreme variations In time spent on a song, 
-declaring that a hit may take either two houti/ or three weeks, 
dependent upon his original ideas. 



Hitting The Flicks 

V At The Taoonio *' , 

THE RETtJRN OF OCTOBER (Tonight) The hybrid product of two 
successful Hollywood formulas, this opus features a beautiful horse, 
and, in addition, a heavenly spirit revisiting the earth. Incidentally, 
the spirit ipakes the horse his temporary headquarters, thus round- 
ing out the formula synthesis. The romantic antics are provided by 
Glenn Ford and a new-comer, Terry Moore, who is no substitute for 
Rita, but still manages to be fairly attractive in her own right. 
RACHEL AND THE STRANGER (Sun.-Mon.) This picture, which 
takes one aspect of frontier life and makes a molehill out of it, stars 
Loretta 'Voung playing a quite unattractive bondwoman who is worth 
$22 to widower William Holden. Robert Mitchum, who as a singing 
romeo is better in criminal roles, arrives on the j*reen and begins 
wooing Loretta by pipping a selection of corn-belt ballads. 

In the insuing romancing and wrangling, topped off by an Indian 
fight Holden finally coming to see his error, the whole thing tui'ns 
out in a way which should surprise no one. 

SHOESHINE (Tues.-Wed.) More or less a companion piece for OPEN 
CITY, t his is an other triumph for the Italian moviemakers. The story 
is concerned with the trials faced by a couple of Italian shoeshine 
boys in their unsuccessful search for some kind of a decent life. 
The boys themselves will come as welcome relief to those who have 
suflerai through American movies of late, scime of which see to be 
devoted to showing how sweet a child can be, 

THE PEARL (Thurs.) A very dramatic version of Steinbeck's moral 
lesson, it stars Pedro Armendirez and an authentic Mexican cast. 
It is the story of a poor family which gets a hold of a pearl worth 
a small fortune, only to find that it destroys, rather then creates 
happiness. 

WORDS AND MUSIC (Fii.-Sat.) This time the vehicle for the star- 
studded cast and hit music is the life of Lorenz Hart. Mickey Rooney 
makes hash out of the biography, but no one is apt to care very much 
with the singing and dancing of such stars as Perry Como, Gene 
Kelly, June Allison, and Lena Home ever-present- The "Slaughter 
on Tenth Avenue" scene alone is well worth the price of admission, 
and if you like Lena Home, don't miss her "The Lady is a Tramp." 



The CUpboard 



ANIMAL ACT , , The following statement was made to the press 
by William R, Peck, superintendent of schools in Holyoke, Mass. 
"We'll not bring the barnyard into the classroom. That's the way I 
feel about sex education," 

NO COMMENT. From the Wednesday New York Times: 
Model, attractive, size 14, S'TJj", bust 36, 
hips 3TA. Greenstein Fessler, 345 7th Ave. 
TRAGEDY, The outstanding contributions of Williams men to the 
world we live in were emphasized once again in the following lead 
paragraph from the obituary page of the North Adams Transcript: 

The Williams College graduate who first conceived the 

l-hyrned greeting card, is dead" 
ALL BROKEN UP,,, The Students for Lynn Haskell movement, 
started last year by George Smith '48, was officially disbanded Sunday 
after the announcement of her engagement to Bill Turner '49, of 
the Saint House. 

TOUGH LUCK. . .The student council at Harvard favored a student 
activltie.s renter ns the UnlveiMly's memorial to ii^ World vvaril 
dead. They were told last week, however, that the Harvard corpora- 
tion had decided to place a plaque in the Harvard Memorial Church 
instead. Cost of the plaque: $70,000. 

AUTOMANIA . Don Haynes, ex-seaman from Ashland, Oregon, 
started on an automobile trip from Los Angles two weeks ago which 
will carry him to all 48 states in the course of 14 months. But during 
that time he will not leave the car, nor will anyone else enter it. 
The doors are welded shut and the windows barred. Inside the sedan 
Is a bed, chemical lavatory, collapsible bathtub, mechanical exer- 
cises, and a hole in the fioor to stretch his legs. Don is making the 
trip to collect a $25,000 bet. 



Vocational Guidance Series To Ofler 
Talk On Personnel Work On Monday 



Under the Placement Bureau's 
Vocational Guidance series, an 
opportunity to hear , about the 
ups and downs" of Personnel 
work will be offered all under- 
graduates Monday night at 7:30 
in the Beta Theta Pi house. 

"Roughly 90% of the men who 
register with the Placement Bu- 
reau indicate a desire to get into 
either advertising or personnel 
work," Placement Director Wil- 
liam O. Wyckoff revealed," while 
comparatively few have the sligh- 
test conception as to what either 
vocation entails. This is an op- 
portunity to leam from William 
S. Simpson '39, Director Of Per- 
sonnel for the Raybestos-Man- 
hattan Co., Inc. of Stratford, 
Conn., of just what the Job in- 
volves." 

Varied Jobs Offered 

Also arriving in Williamstown 



work in Accident, Health Sales, 
and as service Representatives. 
Single men are preferred. 
Tuesday - Personnel Manager 
George S. Hawley, of the Raybes- 
tos-Manhattan Co., Inc. is in quest 
of trainees for his twelve month 
training program leading to Jun- 
ior Executive positions in factory 
management and production. Mr. 
Hawley offers $55 a week to start. 
Wednesday - Clement A. Bradley, 
who is Second Vice President of 
the Chase National Bank of New 
York, will interview those inter- 
ested in a one year training pro- 
gram for commercial banking. Lo- 
cation is New York City or foreign 
at $2700 yearly. 

Thursday - Oflfering Sales man- 
agement positions for complete 
on-the-job training, James B. 
Crane, District Manager of the 



this coming week to recruit June Proctor and Gamble Distributing 
graduates in their respective com- Company, Hartford, Conn., is pre- 
panies are representatives of In- Pared to pay $2700 annual pay to 
surance. Industry, banking, and ' ''art. 

sales. The schedule Monday j Friday - Two representatives from 
through Friday is as follows: | the Glens Falls Insurance Com- 
Monday - George C. Capen, As- pany, Glens Palls, 



slstant Superintendent of Agencies 
for the Connecticut General Life 
Insurance Company, Hartford, 
Conn., is looking for seniors to 



N. Y., E. B. 
Gill and F. A. Roberts, seek single 
graduates with military expe- 
rience to enrWl in their training 
program for home offlcp work. 



Baxter 



our "national Interests or those of 
our sister democracies,, and the 
best chance of winning a shooting 
war if It comes, is for the United 
States to be strong," he added. 
Colleget Important 
"In the development of nation- 
al strength," Dr. Baxter argued, 
"the public should realiee the 



potential of our colleges and uni- 
versities. They played an Impor- 
tant part In victory in World War 
n, both in education of officer 
personnel for the armed services, 
the training of scientists and doc- 
tors, and the contributions made 
by thousands of faculty members, 
both as combatants and in the 
fields of science, miHtaiir IntelU- 
See BAXTER, Page 4 



NORTHEA§TER^ UNIVERSITY 
; SCHOOL o/ LAW ; > 

Admits Men and Women 

Day, Evening alid Graduate Procrama 

Regiatration — Sept. 12 to i^4, 1»4H 

—_ ~' Early application is necessary 

47 MX. VEBNON STREET BOSTON 8, MASSACHUdETi i 



Telephon* KEnmore 4<8800 



TERM PAPERS DUE? 

Be independehf. Rent o 
typewriter and do it your- 
self when you wont. 




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Telephone Woterford 644 




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Purple Swimmers Favored 
In Defending ISew England 
Championship At Amherst 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1949 



(continued from page 1) 
captain Ray Baldwin leenu to be 
fast enough to take first. After 
that, it is hard to say. Something 
lilie Brown, Springfield, WeslSyan, 
and Bowdoln should be the order. 

In the 220, Baldwin and Bob 
Reld appear as fast as anybody. 
Wesleyan's Chip Stone is good, 
though, as is Springfield's Al Mal- 
thaner. Either Win Wilson of 
Brown or Sandy Lambert could 
place. The distance twins, Reid 
and Lambert, have the times ne- 
cessary to give them the advan- 
tage In the 440- Once again, Mal- 
thaner, Wilson and Stone are 
contenders. 

Wineman In the Backstroke 

Wlneman seems to be on top of 
the backstroke crop. Patrell will 
be second, followed by Bowdoin's 
Bill Ingraham, Ted Lammot, 
Springfield's Prank Krayer or, 
Tufts' George Manthey. The 
sprints are, as usual, practically 
impossible to decipher before the 
meet. A partially missed turn or 
a slight misjudgment can elimi- 
nate a person from the finals, and 
in the finals, a similar error can 
make a potential winner an also- 
ran. 

Still, a guess is a guess. Bow- 
doin's Doug Hill looks good In 
the 60, but so do University of 
Connecticut's Charlie Jenkins 



an's Charlie Ash. in the lOO, It 
looks like Jenkins' Murray, Bal- 
dwin, Hill, and Wesman Stone. 
Possibilities here are Singer or 
Brown's Dune Gray. 

Purple Scattering 

The remaining three events are 
not so much Williams, but still 
are not devoid of Purple entrants, 
Wesleyan's George Forbes, and 
Brown's teamates Milt Brier 
and Dune Gray should pitch bat- 
tle for the breaststroke title. Tony 
Soltysiak of Bowdoin, Ephman 
Svenson, Fred Klrschner of Tri- 
nity, Herb Hoefler of Springfield, 
and Pelletier of MIT should be up 
there. In the 300 individual med- 
ley, Bowdoin's Soltysiak, Spring- 
field's Krayer, Brown's Patrell, 
Xammot, and Wesleyan's Forbes 
or Dick Lippincott are the men to 
watch. 

Although there will be no Wil- 
liams divers entered, the diving 
finals will be well worth watching. 
That incomparable duo from 
Springfield, Manuel SeviUa and 
Bill Campbell, should steal the 
first and second slots. Wesleyan's 
Rog Taylor, Bowdoin's Lenny 
Gath, Amherst's Tom Fulton, and 
University of Massachusetts' Joe 
Chmura are other springboard 
super-specialists. 

Awarding the places 6,4,3,2.1 
points, and the relays 10.8,6.4,2. 



and Tufts' Ed Singer. And Chick the final score will read: Williams 

Brashears and Bill Rueckert are 59, Brown-35. Springfleld-30, 

definitely men to watch, as are Bowdoln-29, Wesleyan-19, U. of 

Trinity's Phil Costa, and Wesley- Connecticut-lOTufts-3 Amherst-3 



Tel. 302-M 
Williomstown 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 

GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Marcella and Frank Ikeler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 

Route 2 
Opposite Howard Johnsons 




Co^Smbs' Nine Reports; 
L^^uad Weakened By Injuries 



Ray Baldwin and Hank Wineman, Co-captains of the 1949 Swim- 
ming team, who are defending their New England Championship 
at Amherst today. 



Club, Dekes 
Tie Bowling 

Eight More Matclu's 

For Tournanicnl Cup 



After two matches in the intra- 
mural bowling league, the Gar- 
field Club and the Dekes are tied 
for first place, each sporting an 
8-0 record. 

There are six teams in the lea- 
gue, with each of the teams meet- 
ing each other in weekly Tuesday 
afternoon matches. There are 
eight matches more to play. At 
the end of the tournament a cup 
will be given to the winner. 
Matches Close 

Although the standings look 
rather lop-sided, the scores of the 
matches have been very close, 
with some of the matches being 
decided by only two or three pins. 



Polo Team Schedules 
Nine Spring Matches 

The Williams Polo Team ex- 
pects to begin its regular out- 
door season in the middle of 
April at Pittsfield, Nine games 
have been scheduled to be 
played at Pittsfield this Spring, 
including games with Yale, 
Princeton, Cornell, Harvard, 
Georgetown, and Squadron A 
of New York City. 

Any freshmen interested in 
playing polo should contact 
either Bill Hudson or Viv Heer- 
man. 









The Standings: 








W 


L 


Garfield Club 


8 





Deke 


8 





Delta Upsilon 


4 


4 


Alpha Delt 


4 


4 


Beta Theta Pi 





8 


Psi U 





8 







Luckies' fine tobacco picks you 
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1949 Vursily 

tiattebull Schedule 



Wed. 4/20 


Army 


A 


Bat. 4/23 


U. of Mass. 


H 


Frl. 4/29 


Bowdom 


H 


Sat. 4/30 


St. Michael's 


H 


Wed. 5/4 


Harvard 


A 


Sat. 5/7 


Trinity 


H 


Wed. 5/11 


Dartmouth 


H 


Sat. 5/14 


Union 


H 


Frt. 5/20 


RJ.I. 


A 


Sat. 5/21 


Wesieyan 


H 


Wed. 5/25 


Yale 


A 


Sat. 5/28 


Wesieyan 


A 


Mon. 5/30 


Amherst 


H 


Sat. 6/11 


Amherst 


A 


Wed. 6/15 


Siena 


A 


Sat. 6/18 


Siena 


H 



Kaps Annex 
Squash Title 

The K.A.'s woii the intramural 
squash championship last Mon- 
day afternoon when they beat the 
Sigs 2-0 in the finals of the col- 
lege tournament. Pete Thurber 
'50 defeated Mark Reynolds '50 
3-0, and Fritz Zeller '51 beat Lar- 
ry Woolson '51 3-2. 

In the semifinals, the Dekes 
forced the K.A.'s into a doubles 
playoff as Kim Whitney beat Zel- 
ler in the singles. Zeller and Thur- 
ber, however, defeated Whitney 
and Phelps Edwards to take the 
match 2-1. The Sigs gained the 
final bracket by beating the AD's 
2-1. Woolson beat Fred Scribner 
3-0 but Reynolds lost to Stu Tem- 
pleton, and the Sigs won the play- 
off doubles match from Scribner 
and Jerry Tone 3-0. 




You can search 
the world - ' ' 

ond find many rare things, 
but why bother when we 
bring them all here to you- 

Chinawore, glossware, fur- 
nishings, personal orHcles 
- imported and domestic - 

perfect for wedding gifts 



Plan Vacation Trip^ 

Opener April 20 




Forty four candidates reported 
to Bobby Coombs as the curtain 
went up on the 1949 varsity base 
ball season in the cage Monday 
afternoon. Varsity and freshman 
batterymen now are working out 
under the fluorescent lights 
daily, with infielders and out- 
fielders getting in short periods 
here and there. 

Limitations of time and space 
prevent having any extensive pra- 
ctices for the whole squad until 
the weather allows outdoor work. 

Coach Coombs has ten letter 
men for a nucleus of his 1949 
team, including four starters from 
last year's nine. The bad arm of 
George Ditmar, ace of last year's 
mound staff, is a serious blow to 
Williams hopes this spring, how- 
ever. 

Pitcher Shortage 

There is a shortage of proven 
pitching talent in the cage right 
now, although Coombs is sure he 
can develop some capable starters 
from the eighteen candidates now 
twirling from 3 to 5 each after- 
noon. Four top-ranking mounds 
men are out of action at the mo- 
ment. Ditmar is sidelined with a 
bad arm. Bill Kaufman is no long- 
er in college, left-hander Harry 
Sutton is recuperating from a 
broken ankle, and sophomore 
Harry Sheehy has the measles. 

Bob Ray, Fred Lanes, Bob 
Johnston, Ray Baldwin, outfiel- 
der George Owen and Charlie 
Huntington are holdovers from 
last year's in-and-out pitching 
staff, while Bob Olsson and Doug 
Johnson are sophomore hopefuls- 
Jerry Palmieri, second-string 
catcher in 1948, and Fritzie Zell- 
er, catcher on the freshman nine 
last year, will battle for first-str- 
ing backstop duties. 

Infield Strong 

Although only short stop-cap- 
tain Don LeSage remains from 
the 1948 infield, prospects there 
are good. Jimmy Waugh, George 
Bush, and Tom Healy are rela- 
tively experienced, Ray Mason 
can earn a starting berth if his 
injured arm holds up, and several 
sophomores show possibilities. In 
the latter group Ernie Mierzejew- 
ski and Len Jacob are the most 
promising. 

First base is wide open, with 
Bud Cool and Dick Manning the 
leading contenders. There is a 
strong possibility that several o- 
ther players will be switched into 
the fight here. 

Few Outfielders 

The outfield is long on quality 
but short on quantity. Ralph Ma- 
son and George Owen are excel- 
lent hitters and can fill the left 
and right field spots respectively, 
but need a good man to play be- 
tween them. Unless one of the 
surplus infielders is moved to the 
outer pastures, one of several so- 
phomores will wind up here, with 
Shay Lynch probably having the 
Inside track. 

A four game trip to the New 
York-New Jersey area will pre- 
cede the regular season and give 
See BASEBALL, Page 4 



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where it's fun to be alive. Get a carton and get started todayl 



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World's Largest "Wash Tub 

In glamorous Bali, the bathtub of many 
Balinese girls is the open ocean. With towel- 
wrapped heads the maidens first soap vigor- 
ously in the shallows . . . and then swim out to 
■leeper water for a rinse. Sounds exciting, H 
■-'n't it? 
You can find equal glamour and enchantment 
elsewhere - Bermuda, Bahamas, West Indies, South 
America, Europe, Africa, even the Far East-Pacific 
Phone or visit us for reservations 

Rosasco's Travel Agency 

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.r-jt'^'v?^i , .;.{iiyfci.'ife''i^!ir'.' 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1949 



Cap And Bells 
ToFinUhPlay 
AiringMonday 

The Cap and Bells- WMS Dra- 
matic Workshop will conclude its 
four part production of Emily 
Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" on 
Monday at 8:00 in the evening. 
'These broadcasts are worthy ot 
'Special note in that they are re- 
layed to/station WMNB in North 
A<tam^This is the lirst instance 
of a/dramatic program originat- 
ing/from a college station being 
broadcast over a commercial sta- 
uion. 

■ Thfe cast Includes E[elen Kelly, 
Pdward Stack. '51 -P. Stanley 
;peirce. '50, Catherine Munger, 
'Howard Ersklne, '49, and Miriam 
'libuse. The producer of the series 
is Arthur L,amborn, '51. while the 
scripts and direction are by Peggy 
liamson. Due to the combined ef- 
forts and talent of these, as well 
as other contributors, a high de- 
gree of dramatic polish has thus 
far been achieved. WMS inVites 
^ all listeners to write in their op- 
'' inions of this series. 
, Today WMS will present its 
usual broadcast from the Williams 
Inn, from 5:15 to 6:15 P.M. Mu- 
sic for this week's tea dance will 
be provided by the Purple Knights 
Quartet. All Williams students, 
faculty, wivefe, and dates are cor- 
dially invited. 



WMS Weekly SchedidB 



8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:15 

9:30 

9:45 

10:00 

10:30 

7:30 
9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 
10:00 
■10:30 

7:30 
9:00 
9:15 



Chapman 



oil reserves of Arabia. 

Mr. Chapman, in Speaking of 
our Interests in Arabia, noted that 
at the moment the United States 
owns half' of the oil fields in this 
area - an area whose oil deposits 
jrfe recognized as the world's 
greatest. Despite the small area 
compared to the United States, 
Arabia's oil reserves are estima- 
ted to be 35 billion ban-els, where 
as the United States has reserves 
of only 25 billion barrels. 

At this point Mr. Chapman 
stressed the fact that the Ara- 
bian area was to undergo enor- 
mous development because of its 
potential wealth. As the Ameri- 
can companies draw oil from 
these deposits in Increased a- 
mounts,'the present impoverished 
Arabs are suddenly going to have 
money. Various oil companies are 
going to sponsor construction of 
roads, railroads, hospitals, and 
schools in Arabia. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



RELIABLE SERVICE 

Join our list of Regular 
Williomi Cuitomert ol . . 

KRONICK'S 
Esso Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 



ACOMIC 



EVeningt continuous from 6:30 pm 
ENDS SATURDAY 

Glenn Ford - Terry Moore 



RETURN OF OCTOBER 



SUNDAY - MONDAY 

Robert Mitchum - Loretta Young 

RACHEL AND 
THE STRANGER 



TUESDAY - WIDNESDAY 

SHOE SHINE 



♦ 



Montex 

Dramatic Workshop 
Claasloal Music 
News 

Band of the Night 
Songs by Schauffler 
Purple Knights 
Popular Music 
Campus Hit Parade 

Tuesday 
Concert Hall 
News and Sports 
Band of the Night 
Kellogg & Steinbrenner 
Interviews 
Oreat Expectations 
Vemey Varieties 

Wednesday —•'" 
Concert Hall 

News ' 

Band of the Night 



9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

7:45 

9:00 

9:15 

9:30 

9:45 

10:00 

10:30 

7:30 
9:00 
9:16 
9:30 
10:00 




■* ■ y i if ' . 

Show Time - 

Gilbert & Sullivan 

650 Club 

Thursday 

Concert Hall 

News 

Band of the Night 

Piano Music by McCombe 

Record Headlines 

Ferguson Jazz Show 

Coffee Time at Mike's 
Friday 

Concert Hall 

News 

Band of the Night 

Old Chuck Wagon 

Mostly for Dreaming 
Monday thru Friday 
r 6:15 Afternoon Roundup 
Saturday 



15- Williams liin'BrdbaSr 



5^ 



UNDERGRADUATES ARE ALWAYS 
WELCOME — AT THE 

^illtams eiub 



24 East 39th St. 



New York City 



4 Dining Rooms — 3 std^ and one for dotes. The 
Famous Grill R^etii and Bar. Ladies Cocktail 
Lounge. Theotre Ticket Service. 

^ -'' Rooms overnight at Speciol rates. 

The Williams Club is your club — we hope you'll use it. 



Baxter 



gence, and psychological war- 
fare." 

Dr. Baxter applied this concept 
to current programs at WllUama: 
training of Air Force reserve ofB- 
cers, the expansion of solentlflo 
facilities, an, athletic policy with 
widest pc8sU>le student partici- 
pation, appreciation of the basic 
principles of democratic tradi- 
tion. 



Baseball 



Coach Coomb^ a chance to look 
over some of his material. Seton 
Hall, Rutgers, Upsala, and Prince- 
ton will be faced during the spr- 
ing recess in eeurly April. 

The regular campaign gets un- 
der way on April 20 at West Point, 
juim..jth&fiiat-.hQme.. game-dialed; „. 



for the following Saturday. Con- 
tests with Amherst and Wesleyan, 
Dartmouth, Yale, and Harvard 
high-light a slxteen-game sche 
dule. It should be a highly sue 
cessful one if Bobby Coombs can 
unearth or develop a pitcher or 
two. 



IRC 



gainst world government at this 
time. Professor Newhall . alluded 
to the dissension among the mem. 
bers of the United Nations, and 
the difficulty of changing people's 
fundamental ideas. Above all, he 
raised the significant question of 
whether or not Russia could be 
induced to join such a govern 
ment. 



Phil-.- 



Ueves, lies In a new conception of 
the time form relationship, In 
which time plays an intrlnalo, 
constitutive part. There Is no 
place In history, he asserted, for 
the actionless contemplations' of 
the naturalist upon the timeless 
formulae of events, or for the 
ti:^nscendence of the Bplriluallat 
over nature, which ends up trans- 
cending Itself. 



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STARIING IN 

"REIGN OF TERROR" 

A WAITER WANCER PRODUCTION 
RELEASED tY EACIE-IION FILMS 



CwiWi»«, 





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1949 



Price 10 cents 




EN. mm lETlUN N 




Matmen Take 
Three Firsts 
Ta Hold Title 



Ephs Score 33 Points 

To Lead Amherst 

By Large Margin 



by M. C. Behre 

Taking three flrsts, three sec 
onds, and a third, the Williams 
wrestlers retained the New Eng- 
land Championship at Springfield 
last Saturday. With a team score 
.of thirty-three. Coach Bullock's 
squad led Its nearest rival, Am- 
h'erst, by a nine-point margin. 
The Ephmen now holding Cham- 
pionship titles are: Captain Paul 
Cook at 128 lbs., Paul Shorb at 
146, and Oreen Carleton at 155 
lbs. 

Gaining six victories In the 
semi-finals Friday night the out- 
come became fairly certain; the 
Jeffs placed four finalists and tal- 
lied 24 points, an improvement' 
over their meagre five last year. 
Tied for third place were Coast 
Ouard and Springfield with 19 
points each. MTT scored 14 while 
Wesleyan and Tufts salvaged 9 
and 6 respectively. 

Victory Indicated Friday 

In the preliminaries Friday af- 
ternoon a partisan audience saw 
the entire Williams team, except 
Stillwell, down their opponent to 
reach the £eml-flnaU. -Tho* -owja- 
Ing, with six more Eph vIctoyleST 
WUliams led the field. Jhe only 
defeat was Bill Kelt(Hi's lost de- 
cision to Springfield's Donecho, 
the ultimate lil lb. champion. In 
a consolation match Kelton down- 
ed^^oast Ouard's Carbonette to 
take third place and score three 
points. 

In the 128 lb. class, Eph Cap- 
tain Paul Cook repeated last 
year's performance to remain 
champion in his last match for 
Williams. After gaining decisions 
over Wesleyan and Amherst, Cook 
met Coast Ouard's Penn and won 
with a close referee's decision. This 
victory is a fitting climax to Paul 
Cook's spectacular college wrest- 
ling record. 

Downing Amherst and Tufts, 
See MATMEN, Page 2 




Joseph Piatt, present coach of 
Carleton CoUece In Minnesota, 
who has been olTered a three year 
contract to coach varsity basket- 
ball at WUliams. 



Piatt Offered 
Basketball Job 



Carleton Coach Is 
Ex- Indiana Star 



'49 Gul Plans 
Nearly Ready 

Big Stress On Photos; 
Frosh Teams Included 



Plans for the 1949 Oul are all 
but completed, according to Sid 
Stewart, editor of the yearbook. 
When the winter sports pages 
have been put together and a few 
makeup problems ironed out, the 
book will be ready for the press- 
es. It will be on Campus In ample 
time for distribution before final 
exams. 

'itie '49 edition of the Qui con- 
tains a nvmber of departures 
from past" policy. In the first 
place, the isaitbrs are putting out 
ft book which wUl be of interest to 
all classes, not the seniors alone. 
To. this end pictures will be in- 
cluded of aU freshman athletic 
teams, a section of the year's 
history will be greatly length- 
ened by the Inclusion of many in- 
formal shots of campus activities. 

The tone of the '49 Oul is set 
by its theme, "Williams Through 
the Camera Eye." The main em- 
phasis will be placed on pictures 
of studenta, faculty, social func- 
tions, and sports events which 
have been taken by Life magfiizine, 
the Qui, and by independent 
Photographers throughout the 
year. 



President James P. Baxter, 3rd 
and the Athletic C^ncU have of-' 
fered a three-yfa/ appointment as 
coach of ^vai-'slty basketball, As- 
sistan^'Pfofessor of Physical Edu- 
ction, and assistant coach of 
fbbtt>all and baseball to Joseph 
Piatt, now coach of varsity bas- 
ketball and baseball and assis- 
tant coach of football at Carle- 
ton College, Northfleld, Mlrin, 

Mr. Piatt met members of the 
Athletic Council and basketball 
captain Jack Mason in WllUams- 
town on Sunday. He graduated 
in 1938 from Indiana University, 
where he was captain of both the 
basketball and baseball teams, 
and an All-Conference forVard 
in the Big Nine. For a year after 
graduation he served as assist- 
ant coach of varsity basketball 
See PLATT, Page 2 



Brown Places 
17 Fraternities 
On Social Pro 



Snow Fights, Vandalism 

Distress Brown Prexy ; 

Fund Drive Endangered 



Brown Unlyerslty^Jsas^annQunfc 
ed that, as a result of their acti- 
vities incident to pledge night, 
all the seventeen fraternities at 
Brown have been placed on so- 
cial discipline for an indefinite 
period. 

Snowball fights and various acts 
of vandalism, which caused con- 
siderable damage to university 
and private property, brought 
this ban down upon the frater- 
nities. The prohibition Includes 
all social functions, mixed or 
stag, on or oS campus, and was 
placed on all fraternities pending 
investigation of specific respon- 
sibility. As the fraternity member- 
ship at Brown is roughly one thou- 
sand, the pledge night debacle 
and the resulting stringent ban 
Involves only one third of the 
undergraduate body. 




Following the University's an- 
nouncement, the Interf ratemlty 
Governing Board ruled that the 
Brown equivalent of Hell Week 
would be no more than one week 
In duration and that all events 
connected with it would be con- 
^aed to within the-«ralls ei-theJv 



Lawrence Shows 
Breuer Art Work 



Informal Discussion 

Planned For Friday 



A photographic exhibition of the 
work of architect and designer 
Marcel Breuer, circulated by the 
Museum of Modem Art in New 
York, will be at the Lawrence 
Art Museum through April 3. Mr. 
Breuer will coiiduct an informal 
discussion In the Lawrence Mu- 
seum at 4 p. m. on Friday, March 
18, to which the public is invited. 

The exhibit is open 9-12 a.m. 
and 2-4 p.m. dally, and from 2-5 
p.m. on Sunday. Breuer, a Hun- 
garian by birth is considered a 
leader Jn the renaissance in Amer- 
ican domestic architecture today. 
He was one of 'the chief propon- 
ents of the skeleton frame sky- 
scraper and multi-level traffic 
separation. Today he draws more 
upon the native American tradi- 
tion of wood and stone construc- 
tion, at the same time develop- 
ing a blend of this tradition with 
Banhaus principles he learned In 
Oermany. After studying and 
teaching in Germany, and de- 
signing buildings in England, Bre- 
uer Joined Harvard University as 
professor of architecture in 1937.' 
In collaboration with Walter Oro- ^ 
plus, another distinguished 'arch- ^ 
Itect at Harvard, he has buUt| 
several houses in Massachusetts 
and New York. I 



houses. 

Lashing out bitterly against the 
conduct of the fraternities, Henry 
M. Wrlston, president of Brown, 
declared that their future was in 
Jeopardy unless they completely 
transformed their undemocratic 
and anti-Intellectual attitudefi Dr. 
Wriston spoke of the fund drive 
that has recently been launched 
by the University and declared 
that, with such an incident, "all 
the public relations work of the 
past three years goes up In smoke. 



Muirmen Gain 
Sixth Straight 
NEISA Title 



Relays, Wineman, Reid, 

Baldwin, Lambert Lead 

Purple To 54 Points 



Betty Dissell, as Gladys, ond Howie Erekine, as Albert, reheorse o 
chorus number in the forthcoming Cap and Bells Musical, "All That 
Glitters." 



Ida Kay ,Direcls Two Dances 
In New Sondheim Musical 



Mrs. Ida Llghtman Kay, choreographer for "All That Glitters," 
tevealed that two dance numbers will be featured in the new Sond- 
heim musical which opens at the Adams Memorial Theatre Friday 
night. Mrs. Kay wrote numbers which are entitled "Pantomime" 
on a Chess Board" and "Bordelaise." 

Of particular interest is her© 

"Pantomime on a Chess Board" 



in the second act, which has for 
a background an actual chess 
board as projected on the cyclo- 
rama. Dancers represent the var- 
ious pieces in a chess game: kings, 
'Cioks, knights, etc., while & plot 
is superimposed on the panto- 
mime by the action of the chess 
pieces, thus symbolizing the ba- 
sic conflict of the play. 

The chess idea was well adap- 
ted to a musical with inexperienc- 
ed dancers, since no dancer will 
move more than his chess count- 
erpart would in a game. A ballet 
number would have been far more 
difficult, and using amateur stu- 
dents it is doubtful if anything 
more than a parody could have 
been produced in a show deman- 



Dean Presents 
Sticker Plan 



UC Chooses Committee 
Heads, Discusses Tax 



At the UC meeting last Monday 
night at his house. Dean Brooks 
presented a sticker system to en- 
force the rules for owning and 
operating a car at Williams. A 
house assessment to pay for the 
spring houseparty dance was dis- 
cussed, and the heads of the UC 
committees were elected. 

Dean Brooks defended the pre- 
sent set of rules regarding cars, 
but pointed out that enforcement 
of the system is both inefficient 
and inadequate. A simpler meth- 
od of handling the situation is 
one similar to those tried at sev- 
eral colleges, notably Amherst. 
Houseparty Assessment 

Beginning with regi^ratlon of 
cars Monday March 21, students 
win receive a sticker, which Is to 
be placed on the lower left cor- 
ner of the rear window. Because 
the name of the college on the 
sticker would n^ake the student 
driver e^ily identifiable by North- 
amptoti police, as well as other 
officers of the law, the sticker will 
not have the college's name on 
it. The faculty also will have a 
sticker on its cars. The UC ap- 
proved the system. 

John Orlggs 'SO, head of the 
l^pring Houseparty Committee, 
announced some of the plana 'or 
tjie dance. The Junior clasS: is 
running It, and it will be held 
outside on the lab campus, weath- 
er permitting. Origgs proposed a 
see UC, Pave 4 . 



Students Squelch 
Potter's Release 



Harv Cut From Football 
Stays In Two Sports 

In line with the college's plan 
for financial retrenchment, Pres- 
ident James P. Baxter, 3rd an- 
nounced Monday that he will re- 
commend to the Board of Trus- 
tees that they drop Harvey Pot- 
ter '40 as assistant football coach 
when they consider the renewal 
of his contract this May. 

Original plans called for the 
complete release of Potter from 
the Williams coaching staff, but 
vigorous support in his behalf 
from student representatives on 
the Athletic Council and members 
of the lacrosse and wrestling 
teams, the latter of which he 
coached to an undefeated season 
and the New England champion- 
ship this year, changed the de- 
cision. 

President Baxter reversed his 
stand when 'the discussion of the 
validity of the release took the 
form of the ancient major vs 
minor sport controversy. He em- 
phasized that there Is no concert- 
ed effort to subordinate the minor 
sports in order to achieve more 
victories in football, basketball, 
and baseball. 

As matters stand at present. 
Potter has been made an. offer to 
stay at vniliams in the wrestling 
and lacrosse departments, with a 
pay cut to compensate for his 
elimination from the football pic- 
ture. Potter was picked to take 
the cut by head football coach 
Len Watters because there was 
a "clash of personalities" between 
the two during the football season. 



ding a serious background. 
Kay Dances 

Besides directing the dancers, 
Mrs. Kay, herself dances the role 
of the White Queen who emerges 
as the victor of a struggle between 
black and white forces. Included 
in the first act is t^e amusing 
"Bordelaise" number, a parody of 
Latin-American dance themes. 

While Mrs. Kay and her dan- 
cers were completing their pre- 
parations for opening night. Cap 
and Bells Business Manager The- 
odore Lohrke '49 announced that 
Friday and Saturday nights are 
sold out, but that limited number 
of tickets were still on sale for 
the Monday and Tuesday perfor- 
mances. 



Singers Give 

Solo Concert 



'Wiliiamsiana" Medley 
Featured In Program 



Making its first solo appearance 
in over two years, the Williams 
Glee Club was enthusiastically re- 
ceived at the Second Congrega- 
tional Church in Bennington, Vt., 
Friday night. 

"Wiliiamsiana," a medley of 
Williams songs composed by con- 
ductor Robert Barrow was the fi- 
nal feature of a varied program. It 
consists of parts of different 
songs used as thematic material 
for a composition of a more ser- 
ious nature than the usual run 
of college medleys. Although the 
texts have not been altered, the 
tunes themselves have been treat- 
ed quite freely, sometimes being 
reharmonized, or used one against 
the other. 

Helen Merritt, soprano soloist 
at the Church of the Ascension in 
New York, assisted the Qlee Club 
by offering a group of solo pieces 
in addition to singing two num- 
bers with the full chorus. 

In the next .concerts by the 
Olee Club this year. Identical pro- 
grams will be offered in Bronx- 
vllle, N. Y. for the Bronxvllle 
Jimlor League on March 26, and 
in Town kail March 12. Further 
engagements include a Joint caa- 
cert with the Vassar Olee Cliib 
March 19, and with Wellesley in 
Chapln Hall on April 30. The 
former is sponsored by the Mont- 
santo Chemical Co., and will be 
idred over the Yankee Network. 



by Norm Wood 

Coach Bob Mulr's stellar swim- 
mers splashed their way to a 
sixth straight NEI championship 
in Amherst's Pratt Pool last Sat- 
urday afternoon. Five firsts, three 
seconds, a fourth, and two fifths 
netted the Purple 54 points, just 
twice Springfield's total of 27. 
WeslBJan surprised by taking 
third with 22 points; Bowdoln had 
21, Brown 20. 

The meet went off pretty much 
as expected. The bulk of Williams 
points was culled from the relays, 
the distances, and the backstroke. 
For other colleges, the absence 
of Bowdoln's Bill Ingraham, Bob 
McGowan, and George Erswell, 
and of Brown's Milt Brier hurt 
them considerably. 

Medley Trio Triumphs 

The 300 medley relay was rated 
a toss-up, but it turned out to be 
Williams' all the way. <7o-captaln 
Hank Wineman forged a five-yard 
lead for the Purple in his leg, and 
Bowdoln's Dune Gray and Jim 
McKelvey could recapture very 
little from Swede Svenson and 
Moe Murray. 

Co-captain Ray Bal^dwin shot 
into the lead at the start of 
the 220, never relinquished it, 
but won only by inches, as Bob 
Reid rallied In the last fifty yards, 
Sandy Lambert came in fifth, not 
far behind Conlin of MIT. 
HIU Takes Two 

High-point man for the New' 
Englands.with 12, was Bowdoln's 
Doug Hill, who copped both 
sprints in the good times of :24.0 
for the 50, and :54.6 for the 100. 
Wesleyan's Chip Stone was right 
behind Hill in both events. Moe' 
Murray was the only Williams 
man to place in the sprints; he 
had a fourth in the 100. 

Wineman set his own pace over 
the 160 backstroke course, and 
won with some to spare. Ted Lam- 
mot waged battle royal with 
See MUIRMEN, Page 4 



Sophs Assure 
'Healthy Blast' 

Entertainment Features 
Dance, New Musical 



Signs of a "healthy blast" this 
weekend were seen by Sophomore 
Class President Robert Oeneisse 
after a meeting of the class of 
'Si's dance committee Monday af- 
ternoon. According to Oeneisse, 
'the consensus of opinion shows 
that many undergraduates are 
planning a big weekend." 

Two top entertaln'ment oppor- 
tunities will be available to week- 
enders. On Saturday evening from 
8:30 to 12 Bill Lawson's orches- 
tra will provide some very dance- 
able music for Williams men and 
theh- dates, while on both Friday , 
and Saturday nights Cap and 
Bells will present Stephen Sond- 
heim's new musical "All That 
Olltters." Reports of committee 
members indicated that many 
houses were planning parties of 
theU- own for Saturday afternoon 
and Sunday. 

Decorations for the dance will 
be limited to a simple backi-drop 
behind the bandstand and color- 
ed lights overhead. The simplici- 
ty of the decorations and a soph- 
omore tax have helt>ed to keep 
the admission price down to only 
$1.S0 per couple and |1 $t«^. 



z 



THE WILLIAAAS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1949 



irfefe Wniiin^i J^Safj^ 



North Adqms, Massachusetts 



Willlamstown, Massachusetts 



Student Proposes Revision 
In Status Of Garfield Club 



"Entered as second-?lass motter November 27, 194'4, at the post office at 
•North Adorns, Massachusetts, urider the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and IHunter, Inc., North Adams, Mossochusetts. Published 
Wednesdoy and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Willlamstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 u „. cA;t^,, 

Norman S. Wood '50 Managing Editors 

w"u "^'^^""^in '^° Sports Editors 

Walter P. Stern 50 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981-M or 331 News Editor 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Boiler, M. Behre, S. Blosche, K. f. X. Delony, 
J. Gibson, E. Gouinlocit. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, F. Wiseman, 
R. Hastings. 1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Moclay, H. Picliard, 
E. Schur, W. Widing. •. . 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 .„...,—.-,.-..-.—.:..::.. „ . - .-. 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 ^"^'""' ^onoger 

Harry Frazier, III '51 i...... Advertising Manoger 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 .!.:. Circuiotion Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 ' Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Ganyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moir, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bici<.ford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Noson, E. Sil^orovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



Volume XUII 



MARCH 16, 1949 



Number 4 



Our Social System 



■^. 



The action taken at Brown last week should serve as a warning 
to all of us at Williams and as a reminder, If any is needed, of the 
perpetual imminence and importance of the fraternity problem. The 
article by Giles Kelly in columns three and four of this page airs 
some of these problems and makes what we feel to be a constructive 
suggestion for their solution. 

The whole question of the validity of discrimination and of just 
what discrimination consists of would be meaningless if there ex- 
isted on campus a social unit wjiich accepted anyone desiring to join 
las the Club does now) and which also had the social prestige of a 
fraternity. If the Club were the kind of organization which men 
wanted to join, that is, to be frank, if a number of its members did 
not consideK. it to be a social disgrace, many of our fraternity prob- 
lems would be solved. There would no longer be a residue of dissatis- 
fied left-overs from an imperfect fraternity system. The iraternity 
worship that is so noteworthy in incoming freshmen will be difficult 
to overcome, but the reputation of a strong Garfield Club could 
accomplish the task. 

The Club is, to be sure, just what its members make it. No 
change in the Club's status can guarantee that it will be a strong 
.social unit, but it can give it the opportunity to become one. At pre- 
sent it is necessarily weakened by men who care nothing for it as 
a social unit, but who are either angling for fraternity bids or who 
want qj),.8Qefal responsibilities whatsoever. 

Tliese ien.'whom Kri'y estimates as totaling almost 50 per cert 
of the present Club's membership, have no concern for the Club as 
such. They are not constantly concerned with making it a more 
respected social unit. It is not until the burden of these men is 
removed that the Club can undertake to pull itself up by its own 
bootstraps, for only then will each member be constantly concerned 
with Improving its reputation, just as each fraternity member Is con- 
cerned with increasing campus esteem for his particular house. 

The essence of this proposed plan is having two non-discrimin- 
atory, non-fraternity groups, one having permanent membership and 
social obligations and duties similar to a fraternity, and the other 
composed of those desiring no obligations to any group and those 
still waiting for fraternity bids. 

It is only in this way that the number of men dissatisfied with 
the arbitrary social standing imposed upon them at Williams can be 
drastically reduced. And such an organization is no mere Utopian 
dream. It will be a practical possibility, or better yet, necessity, when 
the Fund Drive is completed and the proposed Garfield Club is built 
on Fraternity Row. 



Platl 



at his alma mater. 

Bunker HiU Under Walters 

He was head coach of football, 
basketball and baseball at Win- 
nemac, Indiana, Sigh School 
from 1939 to 1942, at which time 
he was commissioned a lieutenant 
in the Navy. He then served as 
basketball coach at the Bunker 
Hill Flight School, where Len 
Watters was coach of football 
and director of athletics. Under 
Piatt's tutelage the Bunker Hill 
five played heavy schedules, in- 
cluding the leading teafhs in the 
IMlddle West, winning 34 out of 
38 one year and 30 out of 42 the 
second. 

Piatt went to Carleton, one of 



the leading small colleges in the 
mid-west, in 1946. The school has 
an enrollment of less than 600 
men and about as many girls. 
Last year his basketball team 
came through a rugged season 
with 12 victories as against nine 
losses. Included in the victories 
were triumphs over DePauw and 
Chicago universities, while the 
losses were to such Impressive op- 

I position as Purdue, Iowa, Iowa 
State, and Hamllne. The famous 

j Hamline University team, one of 

I the strongest in the country, beat 
Piatt's five by margins of only 

i three and five points in the^ 1947 

I and 1948 seasons. 

If Mr. Piatt accepts the offer, 
it will be submitted to the trust- 
ees for approval at their meeting 
in May. 



Matmen 



Scrubby Perry in the 136 lb. class 
went into the finals against 
Coast Guard's formidable George 
Rynlck, also champion since last 
year. Loosing a close-fought re- 
feree's decision. Perry took his 
only loss this season but gained 
second place with four points for 
Williams. 

Shorb, Carleton Triumph 
' At 146 lbs. Paul Shorb, after an 
initial Bye and a victory over 
Sprlngflel^ met and defeated 
MIT's Calikjmn in the finals Sat- 
urday. Both itiese wrestlers were 
flnallats in thet Freshman New 
Englands last yedt when the re- 
sult was the same. The next event, 
also dominated by the Purple, 
gained another six-point first 
place and cjinched the meet with 



twenty-flve points. Green Carle- 
ton, also a freshman champion 
last year, out-fought Wesleyan 
and MIT to meet Coast Guard's 
DuPeza in the finals. The out- 
,come was a decisive victory with 
Carleton in complete control. 

In the next two weight classes 
Amherst gained their two firsts 
E^s both Sandy Keith and Jim 
Roush took championships. Bill 
Leitzinger and Pete Smythe won 
second places, however, to raise 
the Eph score to 33. The former 
decisioned Coast Guard in the 
preliminaries and upset Spring- 
field's Weekly in the semi-finals. 
Smythe easily out-pointed Tufts 
and MIT to gain the finals where 
he bowed to Roush. The Unlimit- 
ed class, the only event In which 
Williams didn't place, was won 
by MIT's Lars Soderberg with 
Amherst's MoOrath taking tecond. 



by QUes KeUy 

This is an article in support of the fraternity system at Williams, 
with several remarks pertaining. to some changes that are needed to 
make the system we have work better. 

The right of men to choose their friends and eating companions 
is inalienable. To do away with the fraternity system at Williams 
would be an abridgement of this right and would not get to the root 
of the present difficulties. There would be little gained by such a step 
but confusion and bitterness. The unenlightened practices of a few 
iraternlties have too often been confused with the general character 
of the Williams campus. 

The ^method certain fraternities use to select their membership 
is archaic and deplorable as well as unreasonable and Irresponsible. 
It has Justifiably been subject to attack within and without frat- 
ernities recently. The practice criticized is the one of cataloging 
a man on some basis other than his individual qualifications, that is 
to make him ineligible because he is a Jew or a Negro. The assump-, 
tion being that such a person, because of his membership in a min- 
ority grpup, is dangerous to the "caliber" of the fraternity. This "cal- 
iber" then is protected by a restricting clause in the fraternity 
charter. Thus certain fraternities here still refuse to place faith in 
their ability to select men on individual merits. This is an insult to 
the integrity and discerning ability of the members. Fraternity men 
well know that because of this inhibiting clause they have deprived 
their chapters' of some really fine Williams men. The same fallacy 
does damage in reverse in the case of legacies. Houses have inherited 
some poor material by way of this irrational method of consideration. 

Fraternities that rely on a blanket prohibition against groups and 
classes will be damned for it, and their more liberal mirided members 
will continue to be embarrassed by it until they do away with thlnk- 
ipg in generalities about Individuals. 



"~^--^ TJp To The Fraternities 

The elimination of this anachronism on our campus is up to the 
fraternities themselves; not through orders by the Board of Trustees 
of the College. We can hope that in time this wil' come about as 
more opinion is voiced against .blind discrimination by generalities. 

Assuming then, that we will have a continued, but more healthy 
iraternity system on the Williams campus, let us look at the present 
inter-fraternity relations'.v.p. ^"^^ 

Williams men, it seems to many observers, are Williams men 
first and fraternity men second. The campus does not have an hier- 
archy of fraternities, nor is there widespread snobbery based on 
fraternity afflllation. Instead, we can well be proud of the "open 
houses" at house party time, the exchange of dinner invitations on 
guest nights, the men of different houses who choose to room together 
in the dorSiit-.ries, and the warm inter-fratu-nity friendships that 
are everywhere evident on campus. 

There is, however, a prestige gap between fraternities and the 
Garfield Club wherein lies the malcontent from which springs the 
,maJor criticisms of the Williams social system. 

Everyone on campus from the President down, recognizes the 
importance of the Garfield Club to the healthy survival of the 
fraternity system. It is supposed to be a strong and a deslreable 
social unit, open to any man to Join who wants to belong to it. It is 
supposed to be the social unit for men who do not want to Join t 
fraternity for financial or philosophical reasons. At present it accom 
modates 20* of the present college enrollment which the fraternities 
can not take in. These functions are vital and complimentary to the 
selective fraternity system. 

Need Further Progress 
Towards making the Garfield Club more like an Inexpensive, 
non selective fraternity, big steps have already been taken. Plans for 
the new Garfield Club located on Fraternity Row, and recent con- 
cessions by the college which have allowed the Club the same privi- 
leges and treatment as fraternities, are two such steps. But this is not 
enough. We must look to further progress. 

Part of the solution. I would say, lies in the Club Itself, in its 
internal management, in organizing itself so that a man can take 
pnde in his group even though he may not have gotteri his first 
choice of bids. This is up to its oflBcers and members. The other part 
lies in the present social system on campus and concerns everyone. 
Let us look at the present campus system. In spite of what 
people assert to the contrary, today the Club functions, among other 
things, toaccommodate men who are not bid to fraternities. This 
means there are men in the Club who do not want to be there, but 
are waiting to Join another social unit when they can. They are there 
because they have no other alternative, unless it is to eat on Spring 
Street, like a man without a country. The Club, necessarily, also ac- 
commodates those men who wan no social relations at all, but belong 
only because they can get their meals there cheaply. It can only be 
guessed how much of the Club's membership is In these two cate- 
gories, but if the number is indicated by the amount of men who 
apparently do not participate in the Club's activities, apart from 
eating, it is about 100 men or roughly 50% of the membership. 

These men have a demoralizing effect on the Club. They dislike it. 
they weaken it, and they should not have to be In the Club. Instead, 
they should be in a college dining hall or cafeteria for "independents." 
This would allow the Club to continue to Invite all freshmen to 
join, but it would not make it necessary for freshmen to accept 
only because they were not bid by a house. It would protect the Club 
:rom men who only want to bide there while maneuvering for a new 
set of bids and from those who want no social relations whatsoever. 
Permanent Membership 
Free of members who do not believe in the ideals of the Club, 
I of which one of the most striking is its welcoming of any man to 
the fold, which results in the Club's rich character), the one require- 
ment that the Club could Insist upon would bS a desire to Join. The 
Club could then go on to become a healthy and a strong unit on 
campus, considered by fraternity men and Clubmen alike on a pres- 
tige par with other fraternities. Membership In the- Club would thus 
be 100% by choice and not 50% by necessity. It would really enjoy the 
full status and privileges of a fraternity. 

Another weakening influence on the Club, due to the rushing 
system, is consideration of the Club as a "poop" from which the fif- 
teen fraternities may woo the most promising men. Club membership 
system, is consideration of the Club as a "pool" from which the flf- 
be the "independents" in the college dining hall. Imagine the feel- 
ing that would be created if all houses on campus could dip into any 
one house's membership twice a year! 

There are now plans to build a new Garfield Club. When that 
is accomplished Currier Hall should become this much needed dining 
hall for independents. It could be run as the college ran Currier Hall 
for the Navy during the war. This would not be a difficult admin- 
istration job for the college, which could merely supervise the Jobs 
now done by students. The College would have a place to dine Its 
alutnni and faculty as well as a neutral social center for the use of 
the entire campus. Many colleges have a student union building such 
a» Cuntor Hall could become. 



^he 3\ierry-8o'9l6und 



„ Where Williomt M« 



■Iwdyt/wAl^oma 



DANCING 9 till 3 
ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY 



Or Route 67 near Benninf ten - 



rick rolli 3SS-W 




^■■' 







A SUCCESSFUL PARTY 



Mutt be adequate- 
ly provided for. 



%4K; V,. 



•^x>4i:i'M\r:i>--^ 



: \ ■ 



To complete your Party Preporationi 

• Hand-prtinted troyi 

• Famous German PILSNER 
Beer Glaitet with Crests 

• Hand-blocked Linen Clocktaif 
Napkins 

• Cocktail Borwore 

Country Shop, North St., Willlamstown 




THE 



ACRES 



SANDWICHES 
BEER fir WINE 
TELEVISION 

Open all winter 



THE STATE LINE 

ANNOUNCES 
THE REOPENING OF THE 

COLLEGE ROOM 

For College Forties \ 
Featuring — \ 

• Good Food 

* Excellent Bar 

* Dancing ^ 

Bring your weekend date for o grand evenings 
entertainment 



North Bennington, Vt. 



Phone Bennington 1020 



\ A FILLIP 
For PHILIP 




I 



ARROW'S SPREAD COLLAR STYLES 

, with FRENCH CUFFS 

Phil, Bill and Jack-like many college tnen-IIke the extra 
touch of real style in Arrow's spread collar models with plain 

5 or French cuffs. 

5 If you prefer oxford -ask for Arrow "SUSSEX." If you Ilka 

broadcloth -ask for Arrow "PAR." 



i SHIRTS and TIES 

5 UNDERWEAR • HANDKERCHIEFS • SPORTS SHIRTS 




^^■Sf^ \ '■> 



M, ' '"tV ^<>"» 



>^ '>W»4lf?> 



j-jv ■TV '; ^» '*<»« "'ofij 



u 



,<v)»>!l>'- 



\«^";y?A tt'^^w^ 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1949 



Freshman Grapplers Snatch 
Second New Inland Crown 



Volleyball, Swimming To Close Out 
College Winter Intramural Activities 



Better Last Year's Purple Fencers Foiled 

Meet Point Mark 



In matches run simultaneously 
with the varsity's In Springfield's 
Memorial Field House, the Wil- 
liams Freshman Wrestlers again 
won a decisive victory. Placing 
four firsts. Bill Callaghan, Dick 
Edwards, Jim Shanahan and Jaclc 
Ordeman won Individual crowns 
In the four heavyweight classes. 
Tom Evans' second place at 145 
lbs. and . Aaron Katcher's fourth 
at 121 lbs. brought the total Eph 
score to 31, twelve points above 
the nearest competitor. 

The MIT yearlings captured se- 
cond place ;with 19 points. Coast 
Guard, Tufts, and Wesleyan all 
lied for third with 18 each and 
Springfield^ took last place with 6. 

After Aaron Katcher's fourth 
place at 121 lbs., Fred Pew lost 
at 128 as Tufts took first in that 
event. Fred Toppan, wrestling in 
the 136 lb. slot, was edged out In 
a close consolation match. Wes- 
leyan's Russell won the champ- 
ionship. 

Placing five men in the finals 
the Eph Cubs were also fairly cer- 
tain of victory. The other finalists 
were so scattered among the com- 
peting teams that Williams need- 
ed only one first to take the meet. 
At 145 lbs., Tom Evans, after 
downing Wesleyan and Spring- 
field dropped a close referee's de- 
cision to the favored Hansen of 
MIT and took second place. 

Bill Callaghan at 155 lbs won 
Che championship with successive 
victories over Coast Guard, Wes- 
leyan and Tufts. This rounds out 
Callaghan's perfect record of wins 
this season. Also undefeated are 



In Little Three Meet 

Eph fencers engaged both Am- 
herst and Wesleyan last Saturday 
on Lasell floor, yielding to their 
dual opponents by 14-13 and 18-9 
scores. This was supposed to have 
been the Little Three Meet, but 
Wesleyan refused to let any Am- 
herst swordsman compete in more 
than one event, and the Jeffs re- 
fused to forfeit any points. As a 
result, the two teams wouldn't 
fence each other, and there was 
no Little Three crown. 

Although foiled by a bewilder- 
ing array of opponents ranging In 
height from 5'3" to 6'5'.', the Eph- 
men showed considerable im- 
provement since their 24-3 shell- 
acking by Wesleyan two weeks 
ago. Coach Douglas Boyea said, 
"The Williams fencing team has 
progressed a great deal this year, 
as exhibited by the Little Three 
Championships. There has been 
vast Improvement, especially with 
the saber." 

Dick Edwards and Jim Shanahan, 
the 165 and 175 lb. Champions. 
Out-wrestling opposition from 
Coast Guard, MIT, Wesleyan and 
Tufts they added two more firsts 
giving Williams a decisive advan- 
tage with 25 points. 

The Unlimited matches saw 
Jack Ordeman score two upset.s 
to capture the title. Defeating 
See FRESHMEN. Page 4 



Highlighting the windup of 
winter Intramural activities, non- 
varsity Ephmen will converge on 
Lasell Pool next Monday and 
Tuesday for the 1949 swimming 
championship meet. In the mean 
time Intramural volleyball com- 
petition continues at a hot pace 
with action slated throughout the 
month. 

Only four clubs were able to 
survive the first week of volley- 
ball battling with clean slates, 
as the sixteen entries socked the 
ball to and fro over the nets. In 
Monday-Wednesday action the 
Betas and Phi Delts have set the 
early season pace, each with two 
wins and no losses. Beta topped 
the Saints in a close opening day 
game and then went on to rout 
the Phi Sl6s. The Phi Delts en- 
Joyed an equally successful week 
with victories over Theta Delt and 
Chi Psl. 



In 



Intramuralers Splash 

Tuesday-Thursday division 



of volleyball warring the Dekes 
and D.U.'s hold the spotlight. 
Twin victories by both teams in 
the first week of play have so far 
put them in a class by themselves, 
although further competition may 
go far toward altering the stand- 
ings. The Dekes disposed of the 
Sigs and the Kaps, while D.U. was 
polishing off the Zetes and the 
Club. 

Attention will turn from the 
volleyball court to the pool Mon- 
day and Tuesday with the 1949 
running of the swim champion- 
ships. A. D. and Psl U mermen will 
defend the title which they won to 
gether last year. While the de- 
fending co-champions are defini- 
tely listed as the teams to beat, 
stiff competition can be expected 
for the coveted tank title. 



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Track Team Looks Forward 
To Outdoor Season; Sophs 
Strengthen 1949 Prospects 



With some fifteen returning lettermen and half a dozen top 
prospects from last year's freshman squad, Indications point toward 
one of the best track seasons for Williams in recent years- 
Coach Tony Plansky will have a strong nucleus around which 
to shape his 1949 team, having lost only three men from last year's 
squad-weightmen BUI Blanks and.. 



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(Plan 10 ui» on* avary wvakl) 
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EXPOSTUIATE (oln-poi-tawlala) - To ramon- 

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INCONTININTIT (ln><oif tln-onl-Uo) - Without 



MACERATE (mai>.«r.«l«)-Chaw up. 
PENTAMiTRIST (pon-tofn-ol-rlit) - Davolaa o< 

pantomatar, a pepulor Matic malar. 
SAIUTATOKIAN (Ml.irt(Hih.lar-yan) - 0na> 

who poyt offlclal tribula. 



cm 





Gene Detmer, and hurdler and 
Jumper "Beans" Bolens. The team 
has a five meet schedule this year, 
opening on April 23 against EPI. 

Board Track And Cage Busy 

Until the outdoor track on Wes- 
ton field dries up, the trackmen 
will use the newly-constructed 
board track for running and the 
cage for field events. Some thirty 
men turned out for the first,, call; 
for track last week. 

The team looks well-balanced 
in all of the running events, but 
again may be weak in the "high 
and broad jumps, where the Pur- 
ple were often shut out last year. 
They ought to have enough po- 
wer in the other events to balance 
this, however. 

Sprinters Strong 

The Planskymen will have plen- 
ty of strength in the sprints, with 
Captain Bill Barney, Scotty 
Broolcs, and last year's freshman 
standout, Andy Bacharach, avail- 
able for duty • All of these men 
have been working out through 
the winter. 

In the high hurdles, Ben Read 
returns from last year, and will 
be aided by Pete Maxwell, a fresh- 
man last year, who promises to be 
a standout in almost any event 
he came in second In the Lehman 
Cup competition behind Bill Bar 
ney last year. In the low hurdles, 
Freddy Smith is back, while Pete 
Thexton returns from two years 
ago... 

Fast Quarter Milers 

In the quarter, Barney will prob- 
ably be number one man. Up from 
the frosh will be Walt Zlegenhals, 
freshman captain last year who 
has been running on the mile re- 



lay all winter, and Howie Smith, 
who also performs capably at 
blocking back in the fall. 

Gordy Smith, another winter- 
track man, returns in the half- 
mile, but Coach Plansky will have 
to Juggle his runners to come up 
with another strong man in this 
event. In the mile, Kev Delaney, 
ace of the mile-relay team, is 
back, and barring any unforseen 
injuries suoh as plagued him all 
last year, ought to be available 
for heavy duty. 



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In the two-mile run, both of 
last year's top men are back, 
cross-country aces Bill Kelton, 
and Paul Cook, both of whom have 
performed credibly on the wrest- 
ling team all winter. 

Fole-Vault Loaded 

Turning to the field events, 
Plansky will have three eleven- 
foot jumpers to «rork with, in 
Ed Gouinlock, Steve Pmkerton, 
both of whom jumped last year, 
and Dwight Eockwell, up from 
last year's frosh. A fouXth man 
In this event, Ted Ferry, broke 
his leg in a skiing accident, and 
will not be available tor duty^. 

In the weights and javelin, "^ig 
Tom Edwards and Marty Detmer 
head the list. Although Bill Blanks. 
and Gene Detmer were lost 
through graduation, these two 
men plus Johnny Zebryk from the 
frosh and newcomers Don Gregg 
and Pete Fisher ought to give the 
Purple strength. 

High, Broad Jump Doubtful 

Once again, the broadjump and 
high jump appear to be the weak 
spots. Stan Roller and Ben 
Read are available in the 5'5" 
class in high jumping, but so far, 
no one has turned up in the broad 
jump, although Bob Lewis may 
prove to be a capable performer. 
The team has so far scheduled 
four dual meets and the New Eng- 
lands. TThey expect to add one 
more dual meet to their agenda. 



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AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMbND 
GRILL 



Corning in 2 Days 




THE NEW 1949 PLYMOUTH 
on display on Friday, March 18, at . 

Breirer Bros., Ine. 

227 Ashland St. North Adams 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1^^ 1949 



Muirmen • • • ' 

Brown's OUle PatreU for second 
place. Lammot was second prac- 
Ucuiy' all the way, but a last- 
QiJiiVite spurt by PatreU forced 
tiammot to push a little harder for 
the runner-up slot. 
/ Lambert Edces Held 

The 440 proved to be a tremen- 
dous race. Brown's Win Wilson 

^-wejitput .fast, and led over the 
flrsnoo yards. By 360, however, 
Reid had slipped into a slight 
lead with Lambert a shade ahead 
of Wilson. At.-iM, iambert and 

- — iEteidwere even, but Lambert pul- 
led out into a two-yard edge at 
425, and finally^ nipped Reid by 
about two feet. 

Tony Soltysiak. sprinted over 
the last 36 yards to take MCT's 
Pelletier by three yards. Lammot 
garnered a fifth. Pelletier also 
won the breaststrbke, which vic- 
tory, coupled with his second, 
made him second highest point- 
getter with 10 points. 

In the 400 freestyle relay, Wes- 
leyan's Stone pushed anchorman 

Bald w in, but~the latter yon by Ti 

good two yards. Springfield's 
springboard ace, Manuel Sevilla, 
set a new NEII diving record with 
117.8 points. 

Summary: 300 medley relay- won 
by Williams (Wineman, Svenson, 
Murray), Brown, Amherst, Trin- 
ity, Wesleyan, time, 3:04.0; 220- 
won by'Baldwin (W), Reid (W), 
Wilson (Br), Conlin (MIT), Lam- 
bert (W), time, 2:18,4; 50- won 
by Hill (Bow), Stone (Wes), Jen- 
kins (UConn), Singer (Tu), Edgar 
(MIT), time, :24.0; Dive- won by 
Sevilla (S), Taydor (Wes), Camp- 
bell (S), Gath (Bow). Wells (A), 
117.8 points (NEI record); 100- 
won by Hill (Bow), Stone (Wes),' 
Singer (Tu), Murray (W), Jenk- 
ins (UConn), time, :54.6; 150 back' 
-won by Wineman (W), Lammot 
(W), PatreU (Br). Manthey 
Krayer (S), time, 1:39.0; 
breast- won by Pelletier (^HT), 
Hoefler (S), Gray (Br), 
ner (Tr), Soltysiak (Bow^, time. 
2:35.1; 440- won by Lambert (W). 
Reid (W), Wilson (^rX Malthaner 
(S). tie between iteliln (MIT), 
Stevenson (A)- time, 5:00.8; 300 



..'^^T:;:'' Freshman. 

, Wesleyan's Copeland 



Ind. Medley- won 

(Bow), Pelletier (MIT) 

(8), Arnold (8), Lammot (W) , Wesleyan's Copeland in the fin- 
time, 3:53.8; 400 free relay- won als, Ordeman reversed the deoi- 
by WUliams (Murray, Brashears, ' slon of the dual meet with the 
Rueokert, Baldwin), Wesleyan, ! Cards. Rappaport of MIT, who 



Springfield, Amherst, MIT, time, 
3:41.3. WUliams - 54, Springfield - 
27, Wesleyan - 22, Bowdoin - 21, 
Brown - 20, Mit - 16 Vi, Amherst 
llVi, Tufts - 7, Trinity - 6, 
UConn - 4. 



had beaten Copeland, was also 
downed by Ordeman. Appropri- 
ately concluded their undefeated 
season, the Cub's 12 point mar- 
gin even bettered the record of 
last year's Freshman victory. 



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Even Mr. 



Stanley, on the front desk at the WiltLrfms Club, New York con get 
you sects for procticolly anything, i^rcluding operas, rodeos and ice 
hockey in season. 

■Chances ore the Club can als^ put you up overnight — pleasant 
rooms at special rotes to ur^ergroduotes. Lodles Cocktail Lounge 
and Dining Room, if yo^^ asked a dote or if you're stuck with 
one; and solid meals on^^drinks in the grill. 

B4 East 39th St., New York City 
Jndergraduates are always welcomel 
'It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



uc 



" 



plan to assess each of the housei 
$100, and the Club taoo, to Bby 
fpr the. dance. He emphasiara the 
advantages of such a olan: the 
dance would be non-j^roflit; there 
would be no tickets, no ticket- 
takers, no boup<iers, and there- 
fore, none o^hese expenses; It 
would be^M all-college dance — 
people (xmld come or go as they 
pleas^ All houses would decide 
foi/themselves how they should 
iollect the tax. In case of any sur- 
plus from the. dance costs, such 
funds would be rebated to ;the 
houses. ' 

', Committee Elections 

The UC elected as the heads 
of the Committees: Discipline — 
Stuart Cool '50: Scholastic- James 
Shea '50; Rushing- John Origgs 
'50; Entertainment-Walter Stem 
'50; - Athletlc-Kftvin Delaney 'SO. 
The latter Is a new committee, 
which will serve as a coordinating 
or liaison committee between the 
UC, the Athletic Coi)ncil, and 
Purple Key. 

It was decided that the Bow- 
doin Plan to accommodate foreign 
students would be vqted on by 
the houses. The Shrlver Report 
on the Williams fraternity system 
was discussed. Pi-esldent Andrew 
Heinetean '50 announced that 
next year's JA's would be chosen 
before spring vacation. 



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Cord Meyer^ UWF President, 
Calls For World Federal Gov't 



UN Lacks Power 
To Prevent War 



Atomic Bomb Makes 
War National Suicide 



"Today we live in a jungle of 
anarchy in which the price of sur- 
vival Is military power." Thus 
spoke Cord Meyer, Jr., president 
oLthe United World Federalists, 
as he opened an address on the 
subject "Peace or Anarchy" be- 
fore an attentive audience in Cha- 
pin Hall last Tuesday evening. 

Eventually, however, armament 
races between the major powers 
will lead to a pernicious war a- 
galnst which "there is no effec- 
tive defense." Mr. Meyer empha- 
sized that everyone must come to 
the realization that the only al- 
ternatives today are "federate or 
perish." 

WesknoM of UN* 

Early in his speech Mr. Meyer 
pointed out the strange paradox 
of our world in which the vast 
majority of people and intelli- 
gent leaders are opposed to war, 
yet in whlchi the nations are mo- 
ving step by step toward war 
through increased arms expendi- 
tures. 

The real answer lies in the in- 
adequate political institutions, 
namely the United Nations, which 
has neither the power nor autho- 
rity to Iceep the peace. Charging 
that the governments of the U.S., 
Russia, and Britain must bear 
the responsibility for an Impotent 
UN, he conceded that at the pre- 
sent time' we have no choice but 



Williams Duo Seeks 

National Card Crown 

Playing perfect bridge in the 
preliminary tournament, the 
Jeffrey brothers. Bob '50 and 
Ricic '52, qualified with ease 
for thfe 1949 National Inter- 
collegiate Duplicate Bridge 
Tourney to be held in Chicago 
April 22-24. Sixteen teams, two 
from each section of the coun- 
try, will match wits in the 
windy city; the Jeffrey broth- 
ers and a pair from Skidmore 
are the New England represen- 
tatives. This is the third 
straight year that Bob has 
qualified; last year, he placed 
seventh In the nation. 



Physics Prof, 
Gives Lecture 



Crawford Outlines 
'Long Experiment' 

With the unique subject, "The 
tiongest Experiment on the Face 
of the Earth," Dr. Franzo H. 
Crawford, Professor of Physics, 
presented one in a series of Thurs- 
day afternoon faculty lectures on 
March 17 at 4:30. 

Basing his lecture on the state- 
ment, "Given enough time, all 
things possible will happen," Dr. 
Crawford posed four questions: 
How much time have we got? How 
much time is enough? What limits 



, ,. . „,^ . , the possible? Are these limits va^ 

to ttamtaln our miUtary defenses. „^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^,^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

cussed the origin and develop' 



Atomic Warfare 

Strongly urging everyone to be- 
ware of dangerous slogans, such 

as "If you want peace, prepare 

, „ ,,_ ., .»™„„.H *hot ' mltted that this subject was still 

for war , Mr. Meyer stressed that , ' 

' a "cnraar rvwtetixf^t nr Ufa " XJa 



ment of life on the earth. 
First of all. Dr. Crawford ad- 



"war has become a method of col 
lective suicide for entire nations." 
To substantiate this remark, he 
pointed to the dangers of atomic 
warfare, especially radioactivity, 
the potential threat of biological 
weapons, and the proven destruc- 
tive force of long-ranged bom- 
bers and rockets. 

At the same time the tremen- 
dous costs of military prepared- 
ness would precipate a decline of 
living standards and the exhaus- 
tion of our natural resources, 
giving the people "guns Instead of 
\butter. bullets Instead of bread." 
Likewise, "no nation can prepare 
forxmodem warfare without be- 
commg a garrison state", with an 
attendant loss of democracy. 

In ordeK to effect a permanent 
See CORD, Page 4 



Simpson ^iscusses 
Personnel Carreer 



Stresses Job Interest 
In Vocational Lecture 



"Personnel is peo{>le. You must 
like them and be concerned with 
their problems if you wish to en- 
ter the field." declared William S. 
Simpson '39 Thursday,.esei^ngat Providing' th^x^ best dance music 



his discussion of "A Career in 
Personnel." ' 

Stressing the necessity of meet- 
ing workers on their own level, 
Mr. Simpson, Director of Person- 
nel, of Raybestos-Manhatten Inc., 
warned- hlA< undergraduate aud- 
ience that the duties of a person- 
nel director in an average size 
plant Include much more than the 
hiring .of workers. 

Job Intereii 

••Your prime duty is to keep 
people actively interested in their 
jobs," he stated. Listing some of 
the activities which help to fos- 
ter "job satisfaction," Mr. Simp- 
son Included "publishing a fac- 
tory newspaper, organizing recre- 
ational programs, helping to ob- 



a "sweet mystery of life." He then 

pointed out that the experiment 

had geological ages, billions of 

years, with which to deal. This 

time is Judged from a study of 

lead content In uranium. 

Explains Basic Law 

To answer the third question 

Dr. Crawford had to explain the 

second law of thermodynamics. 

By means of graphic representa- 

See PHYSICS, Page 4 . . . 



From To Have 
Two Bands 



Bubby Hackett, Skip 

Towne To Alternate 



Bobby Hackett, his trumpet, 
and four of his music-makers will 
alternate with Skip Towne to 
provide continuous rhythm for 
the spring houseparty star- 
light dance. 

If the dance is to be financed 
.through house assessments, the 
.Junior Dance Committee, headed 
by John Origgs, has decided that 
the Eiltraction of a birf-name band 
would be unnecessary, and there- 
fore concentrated its efforts on 



the Beta Theta Pi house dufffir+posslble. HackeQ^and Towne fill 



this bill adinirabl: 

Skip has been contracted from 
9-1, and Bobby from 10^8. making 
it possible for couples wandering 
onto the dance platform aKodd 
times to find continuous musi 
When Skip has played the forty 
five minutes out of an hour that 
the union allows, Bobby will step 
in and k^ep the tempo going for 
the next forty-five minutes. If the 
survivals of this dance marathone 
so desire It, the final hour can be 
converted into a Hackett jam ses- 
sion. 

Female Vocalist 

Bobfiy Hackett is bringing his 
boys and a vocalist named Judy 
Powell from Chicago to keep this 
date. Bobby and his musicians 



Export-Import 
Representative 
Here Monday 

John Stark To Deliver 
Guidance Talk; Five 
Firms Seek Seniors 



. With attendance fit all Voca- 
tional Guidance talks running ex- 
ceptionally high, Jo)^n E. Stark 
'38 of the W. R. ' Grace Co., 
presents the fourth in the spring 
series Monday night on "A career 
in Export-Import" at 7:30 in the 
Phi Gamma Delta house. "Wll^ 
liam O. WyckofI, Director of 
Placement announced Wednes- 
day. 

"Having just returned from a 
Ave day trip to New York," Mr. 
Wyckoff added, "I have the strong 
realization that much retrench- 
ment is going on and that start- 
ing salaries are certainly not 
headed for higher levels and pro- 
bably are headed downward. The 
attention of every job-minded in- 



Women Invade Campus 
For Soph Hop, Musical 



UC Nominates 
Committees 



To Confirm Selections 
At Meeting Monday 



Last. Wednesday afternoon the 
Rules and Nominations Committee 
In conjunction with the newly 
elected UC conmilttee chairmen, 
nominated groups of UC members 
for positions on the various com- 
mittees of the Council. These 
nominations will be approved at 
the next UC meeting Monday 
night. 

The following men were nom- 
inated to the committees: Robert 



., , , , ^^ , ,_ ,_, .Oenlesse '51, Richard DufHeld '52, 
dividual, therefore, should ear- j „ u _i r . » n. t^j ■ 
1,.. ^_ J, ^.j ^ J , ,__'and Herbert Louis to the Disci- 
pline Committee, whose chairman 
is Stuart Cool; Stuart Robinson, 
Schuyler Brooks, and George Sel- 
ly '51 to the Athletic Committee, 
whose chairman is Kevm Delan- 



nestly be directed toward learning 
the details of all vocations han- 
dled by the Placement Bureau. 
Job Interviewers 
Representatives of five compan- 



ies to the New York area wiU ar- ey; Alexander Peabody, Richard 
rive in Wllllamstown this coming Dean, and -Brendon Farrlngton 



week to recruit seniors for posi- 
tions with their respective organi- 
zations. The schedule. Monday 
through Friday, is as follows: 



'51 to the Rushing Committee, 
whose chairman is John Origgs; 
Stephen Murphy. John Warren, 
and Dudley Irwin to the Entertain 



Monday- Seeking those interested ment Committee, whose chairman 



In his companies training pro- 
gram in Investment Banking 
James A. Edgar '18, a senior part- 
ner of Baker, Weeks, and I^rden. 
New York, states partnership ma- 
terial is requested. ' 
Arriving also on Monday, E. W. 
Carpenter, Manager of Technical 
Personnel for the General Chemi- 



is Walter Stem; Irving Burrows, 
Howard Simpson, and Joseph 
Mldwood '51 to the Scholastic 
Committee, whose chairman Is 
James Shea. 

At the first meeting of the pre- 
sent UC, President Andrew Heine- 
man appointed as members to 
the Rules and Nominations Com- 



cal Division of Allied Chemical & mittee John Bowen, Walter Stern, 
Dye Corporation, New York, de- Herbert Louis, and James Shea, 
sires Chemistry majors for sales Bowen Is the chairman. 



Sergeant Smith Leaves 

ROTCForRe'nlistm'nt 

Master Sergeant Clarence B. 
Smith has left his post in the 
ROTC Unit at Williams be- 
cause of enlistment expiration. 
He is going to Fort Slocum, N. 
Y,. lor reenlistment and reas- 
signment. During the war he 
was a Lieutenant in the Infan- 
try, and while at Williams 
served as assistant instructor 
in Weapons and Drill. 



College Slices 
Class Of '53 

Many Applications 
For Fail Term 



SondheimPlay 
Shown Friday, 
Saturday Nites 



Class Of '51 Sponsors 

Lawson's Orchestra 

For Dance Tonight 



Williams has not felt the nation- 
wide slump in college applications 
for the fall of 1949. according to 
Dean of Admissions Frederick C. 
Copeland. Although the volume 
of preliminary applications to Wil- 
liams is down to 1600. whereas it pre-Spring dance In LaSalle gym 



Led by a large contingent from 
newly reopened Bennington Col- 
lege, over 250 women have in- 
vaded Williamstown this weekend 
to take advantage of the enter- 
tainment "blast" oflered by Cap 
and Bells and the sophomore class. 

Feminine visitors began their 
infiltration early yesterday and 
were escorted last ' night to the 
Adams Memorial Theatre where 
Stephen Sondheim's new musical 
"All That Glitters" opens a four- 
night stand. 

The Sondheim musical will a- 
gain play before a capacity crowd 
this evening when the curtain 
rises at 8:30. Feature attraction 
tojifght will be the Class of 1951's 



was about 1900 last year at this 
time, just as many flist-rate sec- 
ondary school seniors have ap* 
plied here this year. 

The pressure for admission has 
not diminished, and there is ev- 
ery indication that Williams will 
again have a very strong fresh- 
man class next fall. 

Mr. Copeland expects to have 
around 1700 preliminary appli- 
cations in his ofiSce by the end of 
the month, after which no more 



in basic industrial chemicals, On Monday night, after the UC *"' ^ considered. Out of these, 



Reagent and Fine Chemicals at has passed on the slate to be 
$250 per month minimum. presented, it will procede to nom- 



I about 250, or one man in seven, 
i will be accepted. Final selections 



Tuesday- Manager of the Person- inate and elect undergraduates *"' ^^ announced in the middle 



nel Department of W. R. Grace not on the UC to serve on the com- 
See WYCKOFF, Page 4 mittees With the UC members. 



Jay Presents Olympic Flicks 
In Benefit Show Wednesday 



tftln citizenship papers, attending turn out a form of music that goes 
Bee SIMPSON. Page 4 ' See BANDS, Page 4 



From Hollywood to Providence 
turn-away crowds have praised 
John Jay's latest ski film, "Skis 
over Europe", which will be shown 
by Jay and his wife in a benefit 
performance for the Williams 
Building and Endowment Drive 
next Wednesday night at Chapln 
Hall. This will be the first and on- 
ly Williamstown showing of the 
movie; therefore a capacity crowd 
is expected to watch these action 
shots of the 1948 Winter Olympics 
at St. Moritz. 

Jay Films WhUe SkUng 

Featured in this flick are such 
Olympic highlights as Qretchen 
Fraser's slalom triumph, the skat- 
ing victories of Barbara Ann Scott 
and Dick Button, daring bob- 
sledders, and the colorful opening 
ceremony as photographed by A- 
merica's official Olympic camera- 
man. Jay has long been noted for 
his d&ngerous technique of tak- 
ing pictures while he follows ski- 
ers down the trail. 

In this manner he produced 
some thrilling shots of Walt Pra- 
ger, U. S. Olympic Ski Coach, as 
Prager whirled down' Alps' slopes 
under a brilliant Swiss moon. 

is Jay helped her husband dur- 
the Olympica by covering a 
few\pf the numerous events. They 
collaborated on Ihe downhill ski 
races — \jay photographed the 
starts, hisN^rife was stationed half- 
way, down ^e course and took 
shots of the skI^ as they flashed 
by; meanwhile Jar skied down a 
more direct courseNuid arrived in 
time to snap the finises. 
Mr*. Jay Selects ntuilo 

Not only are the Olympics fea- 
tured in "Skis over Eu^ope^^but 
there are also several scenic vi^s 
of the Swiss and Italian Alp^ 




,#Wiijii**:S:*^89ft 



John Jay In a scene rrom„"Skl8 
Over Europe," which will be 
shown In Chapln Hall Wednesday 
night. 



Commenting on the film. Jay re- 
vealed that his wife is responsi- 
ble for the musical background. 
In choosing the score for a ski 
movie, she decides the mood por- 
trayed by the film and then care- 
fully selects a corresponding mus- 
ical accompaniment. 

While the Jays were preparing 
for the show, Outing Club Presi- 
dent Charles Schaaf '50 announc- 
ed that tickets have been placed 
on sale by Club members In the 
social units at $1.20. He also em- 
phasized that the starting time 
had been advanced to 7:45 to en- 
able students to atteiid the movie 
before the regular Wednesday 
night fraternity meetings. 



of May 

About one-half of the prelimin- 
ary applicants have Williams as 
their first choice. Many appli- 
cants are undecided whether to 
go to a small college or a large 
university, but there is little over- 
lap with such schools as Amherst 
and Wesleyan. \^illlams is at the 
top in demand. 

Smaller Freshman Class 

Last year about 270 freshmen 
were admitted to the Class of 
1952, but the College is gradually 
cutting back to its pre-war size 
of less than 900. 

A recent survey shows that in 
colleges that use the College 
Board exams, total number of ap- 
plicants for next year has dropped 
20 per cent, with a decrease of 28 
per cent in men's colleges as a 
group. These colleges plan to de- 
crease their enrollments by about 
4 per cent next fall. 

This overall decline in admis- 
sions demand will be noticed last 
in colleges like Williams, whereas 
many small colleges, particular- 
ly the hewer ones, have felt the 
slackening-off already. 

Want More Scholarships 

There have been fewer "low" 
applicants to Williams this year, 
partly because the schools are 
more aware of the high standards 
here, and partly because fewer 
young men are planning to go on 
to college. 

Applications from veterans have 
fallen oft considerably, while there 
has been a substantial Increase 
in the number of scholarship ap- 
plicants. Williams will give from 
40 to 50 scholarships to freshmea 
next fall, to about one-flfth of the 
incoming class. Preliminary ap- 
plications and interviews reveal 
a stronger group of high school 
candidates this year, with a cor- 
responding rise in the demand for 
scholarships. 

Life Magazine's recent pictorial 

article on Williams has stirred 

up interest all over the country,' 

but came out too likte to have any 

See COPELAND, Page 4 



with Bill Lawson's orchestra pro- 
viding the music. 

Dance Informal 

Lawsofi's band, featuring voca- 
list Barbara Carpenter, was well 
received by weekenders at a sim- 
ilar dance sponsored by the class 
of '51 last spring. His easy-to- 
dance-to music made the Delta 
Upsilon house ' one of the most 
popular campus spots on Satur- 
day night of the recent Winter 
Carnival. 

Clad in informal attire, the girls 
and their dates can dance from 
8:30 to 12 this evening in the 
gym. By choosing simple decor- 
ations and levying a tax on its 
members, the sophomore class has 
kept the admission price of the 
dance down to $1.50 per couple. 

Although activity in the gym 
must end at midnight according 
to Massachusetts Blue Laws other 
modes of entertainment hsive been 
planned for the early hours of 
the morning. One of several ear- 
ly morning parties will b? a dance 
at the Garfield Club from 12 to 
3. Set-ups and sandwiches will be 
served. 

Left-overs from the invasion will 
be able to see "All That Glitters" 
on Monday and Tuesday. Reports 
from the Adams Memorial Thea- 
tre indicate that a limited number 
of seats are still available for 
the performance on these even- 
ings. 



WMS To Pi^ent 
Varied Programs 

PurpU^ Knights Quartet, 
Sondheim Play Slated 



The next two major broadcasts 
over Station WMS will be "Open 
House at the Inn" today and 
"Dramatic Workshop" Monday 
The Williams Inn program, as 
usual, will Include a tea dance 
with music by the Purple Knights 
Quartet. 

The Cap and Bells Dramatic 
Workshop, having completed Its 
four week production of '"Wuth- 
erlng Heights", is presenting "The 
Rats in the Walls" this Monday 
at 8:00 P. M. This radio play was 
adapted from the well-known 
short Btory of the same name by 
Stephen Sondheim, '50. Its cast 
will include Howard W. Ersklne, 
'49, Stanley K. Pierce, '50, and 
Larry D. Lewis, '62. Both produc- 
tion and direction will be dis- 
charged by Arthur H. Lambom, 
in, '51. This broadcast will be 
relayed to Station WMNB In 
North Adams as was "Wuthering 
Heights." 



THE WILLI AAAS RECORD, SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1949 



f tr« BilliipS IBdiSot^ 



Nor th Adorns, /Mpssoehuietts 



Willlomslown, Massachusetts 



"Entered os second'-closs motter November27, 1944, at the post office ol 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of^orch i, 1879." Printed by 
_Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adoms.NMassachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, TeleRhone 72, 



Richords J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) X- Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 i,A.A.i_„ cji.«„ 

Norman S. Wood '50 MonoXnO Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) Ne»KS Editor 

Lansing G. Scotield '50 c~«,.. I^J;^,^.. 

Wolter P. Stern '50 SP°'*' ^'^'^°'^ 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associdte 

Associote Editors: 1950- H Baker.- S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hastings 
1952- R. Dutfield, G. Kinter, W. Macloy, H. Pickord, E. Schur, W 
Widing. 

Staff Photographer «■..• John R. Kimberly 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 .:•;:-. „ . ,, 

Edward L. Stackhouse '50 ^"^'"«" Manager 

Horry Frazier, III '51 Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 :...ttt7 .;.... 7...::rT7::~"Aiis't Advertising Manager 

-Edward C. Stebbins '5-1-*.— '"•"Wrtvf«^^.vfTyi^^T,i'f-r?v^-?.i^:¥-?:'fr."^Girculation»Monager 

W. Robert Mill-'Sl ......: Treasurer 



Volume XUII 



MARCH 19, 1949 



Number 5 



The Wrong Way 

It would be hard to find two better examples of how not to get 
rid of a coach than Williams has witnessed in the past several weeks. 
We would like to present what, to the best of our knowledge, are 
the facts about the methods used on Dale Burnett and Harvey Potter 

Before Len Watters was hired, he asked, as is customary and 
necessary if he is to be held responsible for the football results, to 
bring in his own staff of assistants. This was financially impossible 
for the college because it would have necessitated the buying up of the 
remaining year on both Burnett's and Potter's contracts. A com- 
promise was reached to the eflect that Watters would bring in 
one coach, and that a readjustment would be made when Burnett's 
and Potter's 'contract ran out at the end of this year. Both these 
men were told on March 6, 1948 that one of them would have to go 
when their contracts expired. At that time, Watters told both of them 
that, if they were both entirely satisfactory, he would try to work 
out some way whereby they could both stay. That April. Burnett 
asked President Baxter and Athletic Director Sheehan whether his 
contract would be renewed if he was satisfactory to Watters. They 
said yes, that it all depended on Watters. 

Last November 30. after the football season was over, Watters 
told President Baxter that he would be happy to continue with 
Burnett, but that he had not found Potter's work satisfactory. Feb- 
ruary 28, the day after returning to Williamstown after a month's 
absence due to sickness, Watters saw Mr. Jay, the new Athletic 
Director, and told him the same thing. Mr. Jay replied that, although 
Potter had been satisfactory in wrestling, Burnett had been un- 
satisfactory in basketball, so they would both have to go 

The Athletic Council had begun discussing the matter in mid- 
February, but had had no contact with Watters until this meeting 
with Jay at the end of the month. Watters. In accordance with the 
conditions under which he came to Williams, stated that he did not 
want Potter as his assistant, but made no reference to Potter with 
respect to wrestling or lacrosse. 

Burnett Hears Rumors 

The Friday before the Amherst basketball game Burnett heard 
the first rumors that he was out. That Sunday he met with President 
Baxter and Mr. Jay and learned that the Athletic Council had al 
ready decided to release him. This was the first time that Burnett 
had had an opportunity to discuss the season with either the Pres- 
ident or the Athletic Director. After learning some of the particulars 
of the season — quality of teams played, condition of the floor for 
the Hofstra game, Sheehy's illness for the last two games, etc. — 
President Baxter said he would phone the members of the Council 
and see if they would reconsider. He told Burnett that he would tell 
him their answer the next day, Monday. Burnett neither heard from 
nor saw either President Baxter or Mr. Jay the next day. nor for that 
matter, until the next Friday. , 

Thursday night a reporter from the Springfield "Republican" 
called Burnett to get a story on his release. Burnett learned from 
this reporter that the Plttsfleld "Eagle" of that afternoon had an- 
nounced his release, reporting the source as a "college spokesman." 
The next day. Prl(jay, Mr. Jay called in Burnett and told him that 
President Baxter had called up the members of the Athletic Council 
the previous Sunday — five days before — and that they had refused 
to reconsider their previous decision to dismiss him. 

The points to be remembered here are: ili that Burnett was 
never given a chance to .state his case before the Athletic Council 
took positive action to oust him, (2) some newspaper^^nnounceri 
that he was released before he had any official knowledge of his 
status, and i3) he was given neither a chance to resign nor any 
time to get a new job before the official announcement was made, 
as is the customary procedure at most other colleges. 

Similar With Potter 

With Harvey Potter the method was similar, but even worse. 
Last Monday morning President Baxter notified Potter that he wished 
to see him at 5:30 that afternoon. At 11 a.m. that same day. the 
President's OfUce sent a press release to the News Bureau announc- 
ing the offev made to Joseph Piatt for the job of basketball coach. 
One half of a sentence at the end of the first paragraph of this re- 
lease announced the removal of Potter from all three sports. The 
News Bureau, however, did not send out the release, but notified 
three members of Potter's New England Championship wrestling team 
Instead. Conferences between President Baxter, Mr. Jay, student 
representatives of the Athletic Council, and members of the wrestling 
and lacrosse teams, and latter with Potter himself, ensued. As a 
result of these conferences the portion of the release about Potter 
was officially cancelled at 4:30. Having Just completed an undefeated 
wrestling season two days previous, the administration's action had 
taken Potter totally by surprise. Not only was he never consulted 
before any ofHclal action was taken, but the administration did not 
even plan to notify him that he was being released until over Ave 
hours after the announcement was supposed to be made to the press. 
He had no idea that he was being released until 3 p.m. Monday, 
, When three of his wrestlers, never dreaming that he had not heard, 
went to see him at his house to express their regrets and sympathy. 
Such a method of releasing coaches is Inexcusable. Both coaches 
should have had an opportunity to state their case to the Athletic 
Council before any action was taken. If the council had still decided 
not to renew their contracts, they should have been given an oppor- 
tunity to resign, with any announcement to that effect withheld 
until the two men had had ample time to obtain a new Job. A "fired" 
coach has about as much chance to get another job as the proverbial 
square peg has of getting into the round hole. That Is the ethical 
code adhered to by most colleges. Williams, the college which is 
supposed to turn |Out gentlemen, should certainly be among them. 



Hitting The Flicks 

WORDS AND MUSIC (Tonight) This time the vehicle lor the stur- 
studded cast and hit music Is the life of Lorenz Hart. Mlclcey Rooney 
makes hash out of the biography, but no ohe is apt to care very 
much w|.th the singing and dancing of such stars as Perry Como, 
Qene Kelly, and June AUyson ever-present. The "Slaughter on Tenth 
Avenue" scene alone Is worth the price, and Miss AUyson's rendition 
of "Thou Swell" is not far behind, 

THE UNAFRAID (Sun-Mon) Originally titled KISS THE BUKSD 
OFF MY HANDS, this opus Stars Burt Lancaster and Joan Fontaine. 
3urt has killed a man In a brawl, and Joan Is on hand to befriend 
:hls obviously maladjusted veteran. Joan kills too, and the outcome 
of this dilemma is neither rational nor satisfying, which is unfor- 
tunate, for the picture has many good parts that are both. 
THE VELVET TOUCH (Tues-Wed) Another in the extended series of 
3lick melodramas, this gives Rosalind Russell a new string of cliches 
bg play with, and thereby a chance to show her skill at this popular 
Hollywood sport. She plays a murderess, and spends most of her time 
iodglng Sidney Qreenstreet, as uncompromising a dectltlve as one 
sould hope to find. Entertaining, but you will probably feel that you've 
jeen the whole thing before. 

THE RAIDER (Thurs.) These days technlcolored epics are easy to 
come by, but anyone who misses this one has lost a great' opportunity 
to see what a realjliye easf an^ good script can do for cojor films. 
This is a story of merchant seamen adrift in a lifeboat, one that a 
German sub is following, In hopes that it will lure some unsuspecting 
merchantman within shooting distance. A ship arrives, and the sub 
surfaces to give, battle, one which for realism, suspense and good 
photography is really something to see. 

ROGUES REGIMENT iPrl.-Sat.) Take the French Foreign Legion, 
add a sultry night-club entertainer, assorted Nazis and recalcitrants, 
and a US. Intelligence officer, splash against the background of 
Saigon, nd you won't be far off on this one, Dick Powell stumbles 
through the subletles of espionage, in and out of the arms of Marta 
Tcren. and somehow manages to unscramble the whole mess in the 
end.. It seems that one of Hitler's boys In on the post-war loose, and 
raising hob .with the Foreign Legion, Naturally this culprit must 
be brought to Justice, which task belongE to Mr. Powell, aided, of 
course, by the beauteous Miss Toren, his contact with the despera- 
then we might as well fire officers like Powell. . . 

does. If spies et al were really as simple as this picture makes out, 



Letters To The Editor 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 

GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Marctlla and Frank Ikder 
OPEN ALL VEAR AROUND 



Tel, 302-M 
Williamstown 



.Rout* 2 
Opposite Howord JohnsorM 



To the Editor of the Williams Record: 

A correctioh. please. 

The othei-wise accurate story in the RECORD of March 12, en- 
titled "Prof. Johnson Defends UN", has a very misleading sub-head 
to the effect that I disaprove islci of an alliance of western nations. 
I do disapprove of a federal union of western democratic 
states, as your story shows. I do not disapprove of an alliance among 
them, although of course I do not yet know the terms of the propos- 
ed North Atlantic Pact, and therefore am in no position to say 
whether I approve of this specific measure. 
March 13, 1949 Joseph E. Johnson 




DON'T FORGET 



OPEN HOUSE 

at "The Inn'' 

4 - 7 PM TODAY 



Dance to the music of 



THE PURPLE KNIQHTS 

T 

Enjoy o Hot Buttered Rum by the open fire 



Wl ARE NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS 
FOR THE NEW 



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The new Foto-fill filler, for example, 
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yKi: 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1949 



Walters Announces Informal 
Spring Football Practice Plans 



Coach Len Walters outlined his 
plans for an Informal six week 
spring football practice In a foot- 
ball meeting In Jesup last Thurs- 
day. He emphasized the Informal 
aspect of the practice, telling the 
men that no athlete who has any 
idea of competing in any spring 
sport whatsoever will be accept- 
able until cut from the squad by 
the coach. 

Postcards announcing the meet- 
ing had been sent to 90 men, in- 
cluding last year's freshman 



develop hitherto unknown talent. 
Second, it will help put Williams 
on a par with its opponents who 
have spring training. Wesleyan, 
Amherst, Union, Rochester, Bow- 
doln. Tufts, and Trinity all have 
either a formal or informal spring 
session. 

Walters hopes to pick up add- 
itional players and not, principal- 
ly, to work with men already on 
the first team, because in most 
cases these men are active in oth- 
er spring sports. The practice will 



squad, holdovers from the varsity „„„k„v,i 

^ " J , . probably end up w th an inter- 

squad, and anyone else who was ^^^^ ^^^^ 



lieard to express interest. Coach 
Walters expressed hope that men 
who have been In no way connect- 



Missouri-T 

He announced that next year's 



ed with football in the past will varsity will use the Missouri T, 



come out and give 11 a try. 

New Talent 

The purpose of the informal 
practice is twofold. First, it l.s 
designed to keep In shape those 



a complete change from Inst year's 
I offense. The freshman team start- 
ed using It last year. 

Walters also clarified his posi- 
tion in the recent Harvey Potter 
meTwho aVho'l touched by "any ^^'°^''^^- ^ misunderstanding cam- 
other sport and to give Walters ""' ''^^ '^"'^ h"" "-esponsible for 
an opportunity to uncover and the planned release of Potter from 

the wrestling and lacrosse posts. 



Dekes, Betas Ahead 
In Volleyball Tourney 
League I 

Betas 3-0 

Phi Delt 3-0 

Delta Psl ' 2-1 

Theta Delt 2-1 

Chi Psl ■ 1-2 

Phi Oam 1-2 

Alpha Delt 0-3 

Phi 81g 0-3 

lieague n 

Dekes 3-0 

Delta Upsllon , V 3-0 

Kappa Alpha 2-1 

Sigma Phi 2-1 

Psl Upsllon 1-2 

Garfleld Club 1-2 

•Zela Psl 0-3 

Delta Phi 0-3 



1949 Lacrosse 
Team J^chedule 



VAkSITY 
April 16 Union 



ARE YOU CONSCIOUS? 

Don't take us literally; we mean ore you conscious 
of the fact that if you need anything insporting goods 
you can sov emoney by coming over to North Adams 
and shopping at the Center Sport Store? Consider these 
items: Sleeping Bogs, $5.98 up; Army Pup Tents, $3.98; 
Telescope Rods, $5 volue for $3.75; Nylon Ponchos 
$2.98; Army Fatigue Pants, $2 98; White T-Shirts, 49*; 
Army Knapsacks, 4.50 value for $2.25 We've got. much 
other junk on hand, so stop in at: 

Center Sports Store 



15 Center Street 



North Adams 



April 23 
[April 30 
May 7 
May 14 
May 18 
May 21 
May 28 

FRESHMEN 
April 23 Ml. Hermon 
May 14 Union 
May 18 RPI 
May 25 Deerfleld 



Springfield 

Yale 

MIT 
Union 

Harvard 

Tufte 

Dartmouth 



Away 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Away 

Home 
Home 
Away 
Away 



PATRONIZE 



RECORD 
ADVERTISERS 



Track Team 
Runs In Ohio 
K Of C Meet 



Clo8e Race Expected; 
Baldwin Wallace Is 
SlrongcstOpponent 



Ski Team Places Second In 
Intercollegiate Meet At Turine 



A post-season race in the Cleve- 
land Knights of Columbus meet 
Friday night afforded the Purple 
indoor mile relay team its last 
chance to turn in another winn- 
ing performance this winter. They 
had already won two other races 
during the regular season. 

Prospects were that the race 
would be an evenly matched one. 




Colling, Prime Take 

First**; Meet Oo«e 



Baldwin Wallace 



the 



favored team, had turned in a 
3*27.1 mile in the National AAU 
meet, while the best time for the 
Ephmen this season was 3:27.7, 
only siXi^tenths of a second slow- 
er. At the same time, however, 
the other entrants. Ohio Wes- 
leyan, Michigan Normal and the 
University of Pittsburg were dark 
horses, since no comparative 
times were available on them. 
Third Last Year 

Last year the Purple quartet 
placed third in the same race, 
which Baldwin Wallace won, but 
they beat Ohio Wesleyan and the 
University of Miami fOhio) to 
the tape. This year Bill Barney, 
Walt Ziegenhals. Gordy Smith 
and Delany were running for Wil- 
liams. 

The meet was held at the same 
time as a Williams Alumni meet- 
ing in Cleveland, giving a num- 
ber of old-grads a chance to see 
the team in action. 

This will be tlie la.sl mile-re- 
lay foi- Co-Ciiptains Barney and 
Smith, both of whom are seniors. 



^^^\ 






^ \ 



"Don LeSa^e, who will captain 
the 1949 Williams varsity base- 
ball team." 





LeSage Leads 
Baseball Team 







Luckies' fine tobacco picks you 
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Editor's Note: This is the first in 
a series that will be run on the 
Captains of spring sports at Wil- 
liams. 

This year's varsity baseball 
team will be captained by Don 
LeSage, a tiny shortstop who has 
been playing first string on Bob- 
by Coombs' ball clubs for four 
years. Don hit .301 on last year's 
Little Three Champion team and 
will be remembered as the guy 
whose sensational defensive play 
in the Holy Cross game paced the 
Purple in their stunning 5-4 up- 
set win over the Crusaders. 

Don, lilce pitcher George Dit- 
mar and left fielder Ralph Ma- 
son is a Berlcshire county home- 
product. He compiled a phenome- 
nal athletic record at North 
Adams' Drury High by playing 
three years of varsity football, 
baseball and basketball. He was 
acting football captain, basket- 
ball captain and furthermore was 
selected for the All-Berkshire 
team in all three sports 

Second LeSage 

A member of Phi Delta Theta 
Don is the second LeSage to play 
baseball at Williams. His brother 
Bernie was an outstanding cat- 
cher Just before the war. 

Don also runs the Student- 
Laundry at Williams in his spare- 
time. 




The Williams Ski Team turned 
in an exceptional performance 
last weekend by placing second 
at the Snow Ridge Inter-CoUe- 
glate Championships in Turine, 
New York. 

Out of the eight colleges repre- 
sented, forto men in all, Williams 
came in seMnd with 193.6 points- 
three points behind the winner, 
Syracuse, and Cornell came in 
third with 180.9 points. In the 
individual slalom Ed Collins pla- 
ced first; both his runs were 49.5 
seconds, which was the fastest 
time of the day. Pete Finiay, the 
ace Williams runner and captain 
had trouble on both his runs and 
placed .seventh. Dune Campbell 
placed tenth, Johnny Brlnkerhoff 
eighteenth, and Ray Prime twen- 
tieth. 

Prime First 

In the down-hill Prime came in 
first with 46.1 seconds, only .7 of 
a second behind was Collins, who 
placed fifth. Brlnkerhoff was 
eighth, and Pinlay twelfth. Camp- . 
bell did not finish because he 
broke his harness by hitting a 
tree. Nine other men also piled 
into this tree. 

The meet was so close that if 
Campbell had finished or Pin- 
lay had come in a little better in 
the slalom, Williams would have 
won it. The team has high hopes 
for the future because this meet 
was only Collins' second and being 
a freshman, he shows great pro- 
mise. Also before this meet Brink- 
erhoff had never raced slalom and 
down-hill; he showed up very well 
in both these events. 

The team has been handicap- 
ped by lack of snow all year. They 
have had to cancel most of their 
meets. The excellent showing in 
this meet points to a fine team 
for next year 



Dekes, Betes 
Lead Bowlers 



With the third round of mat- 
ches having been run off, the 
Betes and the Dekes stand tied 
for first place in the interfra- 
ternity bowling league, each sport- 
ing an 11-1 record. 

Although the scores are not 
even, some teams having bowled 
in more matches than others, the 
positions are rounding out. The 
Betes have been the surprise of 
the league, ending up in a tie for 
first place after a relatively weak 
beginning, 

800 Totals 

So far, the Betes and the DU's 
have turned in the highest match 
scores, both of them running up 
totals over 800 in several matches. 
The DU's. after starting strong, 
have been weakened by the loss 
of their top bowler, and probably 
the best bowler in the league in 
the person of Harry Sutton, who 
fractured his ankle in a skiing 
accident. In addition, they have 
lost some of their best men to base 
ball practice. 



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you wish our "Three Honeymoon 
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• Plastic table clothes 

• New oil cloth 79«! a yard 

Serving Williams Men Since 1888 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1949 

... -11 ,. , ,. . . ., ■ 



Bands - - - 

into the classifying files of the 
MCA. as "danceable jazz". This 
type was used very effectively at 
the Dartmouth Winter Carnival 
by a band that some say doesn't 
come up to Bobby's. The most 
famous part of Bobby Hackett is 
his style on the trumpet, which is 
comparable to that rendered by 
Billy Butterfield in Artie Shaw's 
recording of "Stardust". 

Skip Towne and his music is 
already well known at Williams, 
as his drums provided the beat for 
the Purple Knight's dance last 
October. Six times New England 
champion drummer, Skip has been 
providing popular music at col- 
lege dances for the last several 
years. In addition to the music of 
his nine piece orchestra and a vo- 
calist. Skip will, if requested, put 
on his "black light" drum number. 



WMS Weekly Schedule 



Copeland - - ■ 

real etfect on this year's appli- 
cations. Several letters from a- 
broad have been received in re- 
cent weeks as a result of the life 
story, however. 

All applicants for Williams will 
take College Board exams, held in 
early April. 



Phy 



SICS 



tions, he gave this law a molecu- 
lar interpretation, by which mat- 
ter could be considered in states 
of high or low disorder or entropy. 
An example of the lowest entropy, 
he said, is an atom at absolute 
zero temperature. But all matter 
has higher disorder values. 

To demonstrate the probability 
that higher states of disorder 
are more likely, he conducted an 
experiment on a probability ap- 
paratus. An analogy. Dr. Craw- 
ford described, is stirring a mix- 
ture of ink and water: it is highly 
improbable that the ink will ever 
concentrate itself in the original 
drop which was put in solution. 

"How long must you wait for 
a probable thing to happen?" he 
then asked. After a study of a 
large graph of molecules against 
, energy, he concluded that eons 
would be needed. Chances, then 
are infinitesimal. 

Dr. Crawford humorously ap- 
plied the concept of entropy to 
the behavior of peoples, after- 
which he u.sed it to explain why 
some organisms developed and 
others declined. This included ob- 
servations of encrgy-gcno-muta- 
tion relations. 

Next week at the same time. 
Dr. Carl Sherman Hoar. Profes- 
sor of Biology. will discuss 
"Changing Methods of Preven- 
tion and Treatment of Infection." 
The meeting will be held in 
Thompson Chemistry Laboratory 
lecture hall. 



L (i. BALFOUR CO. 

rR«iTERNITY JEWELRY 

Bodges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Stationery Programs 

Club Pins Keys 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Woterford, N. Y. 

Telephone Woterford 6-14 




Evenings continuous from 6:30 pm 



SATURDAY 

Judy Gorlcnd — MMickey Rooney 

WORDS AND MUSIC 

Feature 6:30, 8:45 
SUNDAY - MONDAY 

J34SDDUD-1 4Jng -3UID4UO-j UDOf 

THE UNAFRAID 

Feol-ure, Sun. 2:00, 3:40, 5:20, 
7:15, 9:10; Mon. 7:00, 8:55 

Rosilond Russell — Leo Genn 

VELVET TOUCH 

Fsofura 6:40, 8:40 



Monday thru Friday 


,1 
9:15 Band of the Night 


5:00 - 6:15 Afternoon Roundup 


9:30 Show Time 


Monday 

8:00 Dramatic Workshop 


10:00 Gilbert and Sullivan 
10:30 650 Club 


8:30 Classical Music 


Thursday 


9:00 News 

9:15 Band of the Night 


7:30 Faculty Talks 
7:45 Concert Hall 


9:30 Songs by Schaulller 

9:45 Music 

10:00 Plumb's Bop Shop 
10:30 Campus Hit Parade ' 


9:00 News 

9:15 Band of the NlRht 
9:30 Piano by McCombe 
9:45 U. S. Dept. of Education 


Tuesday 


10.00 Ferguson Jazz Show 


7.30 Concert Hall 


10:30 Coffee Time at Mike's 


9:00 News-Sports 
9:15 Band of the Night 
9:30 Kellogg & Stelnbrenner 
9:45. Evans and Park 
10:00 Great Expectations 
10:30 Verney Varieties 
Wednesday 


Friday 

7:30 Concert Hall 
9:00 News 

9:15 Band of the Night 
9:30 Old Chuck Wagon 
10:00 Mostly for Dreaming 


7:30 Concert. Hall 


Saturday 


9:00 News 


5:15 - 6:15 Williams Inn Bdcst. 



WyckoH- .- 

and Company, New York, John E. 
Stark '38 will follow up his talk 
of Monday night hy Interviewing 
June graduates for positions in 
Export-Import. Accounting and 
financial work is involved and the 
student should be available for 
South American duty if the com- 
pany so requests. 
Wednesday- Single salaried field 
representatives are sought by I. 
M. Dockham, Superintendent of 
Agents of the Aetna Casualty and 
Surety Company, Hartford, Conn. 
Sales ability is needed, Mr. Dock- 
ham offering an annual .salary of 
$2700 to start. 

Thursday and Friday- Mr. Thom- 
as G. Watson, Assistant Place- 
ment Director of the Vick Chemi- 
cal Company New York, will be at 
Williams two days to intei-view 
seniors as regards advertising- 
sales training programs for future 
advertising and merchandising ex- 
ecutives. It is requested that only 
single men apply due to contin- 
uous traveling during training. A 
good salary plus all expen.ses 
while on the road is offered. 



I Simpson 



Cord • • ■ 



foremen's meetings." 

"Personnel work Is not healthy 
for family relations. You do not 
get home very .^uch." You must 
spend as many nights as possible 
participating In company activ- 
ties and then "drink a few beers" 
after the activities in order to be- 
come friendly with the workers 
and find out some of the minor 
frictions within the plant. 

Mr. Simpson declared that, al- 
though a man starting in the field 
is usually required to spend from 
six months to two years working 
in the factory itself, "the exper- 



Planned Hiintini 



1 



Miller. Lamb & Hunter 

Incorporated 

W'cbcr Avenue 

XOIITIl ADAMS, MASS. 

Tcleplione .3.553 



peace, "we must transform and 
strengthen the UN", entrusting It 
with the power to require peace- 
ful settlements of disputes, con- 
trol national armed forces, con- 
trol dangerous aspects of scienti- 
fic development, and raise an In- 
dependent levy. 

Actually, Mr. Meyer advocated 
a UN that would be able to make 
and enforce laws and that would 
take away the reasons that lead 
men to violence by relieving the 
threats of starvation and depres- 
sion. At the same time "the vast 
resources of the world could be 
shifted to the business of saving 
lives." 

Russian Question 

The first steps toward achiev- 
ing this would be to create an 
aroused and informed American 
public and to gain a majority In 
the Congress of the U.S. Once 
this country had announced Its 
support of a world government, 
Mr. Meyer believed that it could 
count on the warm response of 
many other nations, especially 
the smaller ones. 

As regards to the question of 
whether or not Russia would join, 
he contended that to be effective 
it would have to be a universal 
federation. Optimistically Mr. Me- 
yer professed that Russian oppos- 
ition will not last forever, but 
that meanwhile we should form 
a partial federation within the 
UN. 

In conclusion, Mr. Meyer gave 
the American people two choices 
of Internationalism, a system of 
imperial American security or a 
world federation of equal nations. 
He confidently expressed the be- 
lief that "once understanding the 
nature of world government, the 
American people would make the 
choice wisely." 



ience gained proves to be very 
valuable in understanding the 
problems of the laborer." Sal- 
aries for men in personnel work 
range from $2500 to $10,000 per 
year. 



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/olume XLIII, Number 6 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 1949 



Price 1 cents 



ibph Ball, Musical 
ilite Big Weekend 



,ap and Bells 
Weat Success 



(ill Lawson Plays 
kt Sophomore Hop 

by Clark Kent 

Over 260 young ladles poured 
^nto BUlvllle last weekend to help 
^hat might technically be called 
the first event of the spring social 
season live up to Its advance no- 
Itlces as a "healthy blast". 

It was more than somewhat 
[colder than on Winter Carnival 
■weekend, but the whole crowd 
[warmed ifp well, and demonstrat- 
led, at the same time, that here at 
I Williams we don't have to commit 
murder to have a good time. 
Benninrton Back 

Social life was given a shot In 
the arm by the return of the 
troops to B'town. It was their 
first blast of the new semester, 
and by Saturday night over 100 
of the eager young things had 
checked out. It was harj to dis- 
cover Just how many were he.ided 
for WllUamstown and how many 
were headed for the hills to iivoid 
the first avalanche of scrounyers. 
Sondheim Scores 

Festivities got off to a fast 
start Friday night with the oKn- 
Ing of Steve Sondhelm'.s musical 
comedy, "All That aiitlers." nee 
col 6.) It played four perforn.on- 
ces to sellout crowds, a minor 
theatrical miracle In these inrts 
which ought to let Cap and Bells 
produce a couple of claxslc!. in 
comparative safety. 

The antics of the Cady family, 
demonstrating all that Is worst 
in the upper middle class Amer- 
ican family, were particularly easy 
to laugh at, and brought loud 
guffaws from the audience of 
country gentlemen, potential 
country gentlemen, and their wo- 
menfolk. 

Dance Delifhtful 

The Sophomore Hop occurred 
on Saturday night In the Gym. 
It was a little hard to breathe, 
but the music of Bill Lawson and 
the Boys, ably assisted by vocal- 
ist Barbara Carpenter, made easy 
listening and easier dancing for 
the young couples. 

Decorations were on a winter 
sports motif, featuring basketball 
and winter track. The mood was 
one of relaxation, and a fine time 
was had by all. The Garfield Club 
and the Sigs both threw small 
balls of their own, both unhectlc 
and both great successes. 

Sunday dragged, as usual. 



Coaching StaflF 
Not Changed 

Piatt Considering Offer, 
Nothing Definite Yet 



No further action had been 
,taken on the coaching situation 
at Williams up to Monday even- 
ing, according to Athletic Direc- 
tor John C. Jay. 

The athletic department still is 
awaiting definite word from Joe 
Piatt, Carleton College coach, who 
has been offered the top basket- 
ball Job here, and who also would 
assist in football and baseball. It 
is generally expected that Piatt 
will accept the Williams offer, 
but no statement has been issued 
by Mr. Jay on this matter. 

Harvey Potter has not been 
removed as coach of wrestling and 
lacrosse, but will not coach foot- 
ball next fall. It was announced 
last week that basketball coach 
Dale Burnett's contract would not 
be renewed for next year, In a 
move originally intended to cut 
down the number of coaches 
drawing salftrles. 



:X: 



Six Held In Death 
Of Dartmouth Junior 

HANOVER, N, H.. March 19- 
A Dartmouth Junlor.Thomas A. 
Doxsee, was released on $2000 
ball yesterday on a manslaugh- 
ter charge for the fatal beating 
of a classmate, Raymond J. 
Clrotta. Five others, all frat- 
ernity brothers of Doxsee in 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, were re- 
leased without bail but under 
pledge to appear In court Mon- 
day as material witnesses. . . 

The beating took place on 
Friday night between 11 and 
12 P.M. in Cirotta's dormitory 
room. Dpxsee, a first-string 
football center, and the others 
left Cirotta after the fight. He 
was found unconscious by his 
roommate some time later, and 
died in the hospital at 4 A.M. 
of a cerebral hemorrhage. 

In the absence of any official 
statement as to a pcssible mo- 
tive, students said only that 
Cirotta was con.sldered "obno- 
xious" by some of his class- 
mates. Reports state that all 
six were drinking before they 
went to Cirotta's room. 



Jay To Show 
Flicks Tonilc 



"Skis Over Euro(ie" 

Pictures 'w Olynipicii 



V C Agrees 
To House lax, 
Passes Rules 



Baxter Shows College's 

Problem Of Reduction 

Of Undergrad Body 



There are still a Umltecfc nu'p- 
ber of ticket! on sale for tonight's 
benefit performance of John Jay's 
latest film. "Skis Over Europe.", 
according to OuUdr Club Presi- 
dent Charles Schaaf '50. The film, 
which will be shpwn in Chapin 
Hall for the benefit of the Wil- 
liams Building and Endowment 
Fund, has been well received by 
nation wide audiences. Tickets 
for $1.20 can be obtained from 
Outing Club representatives in 
the social units or on Spring St. 

Schaaf once again emphasized 
that the movies and the accom- 
panying lecture will start promp- 
tly at 7:f5 to enable undergra- 
duates to attend the show before 
house meetings 

The noted photographer made 
the movies while attending the 
1948 Olympics at St. Moritz. and 
many of the more exciting shots 
were filmed by Jay as he followed 
the skiers down dangerous runs. 
Jay's wife and assistant. Lois Jay. 
has chosen appropriate back- 
ground music. 



Williams, Vassar 
Glee Clubs Blend 



Joint Concert Features 
German Masterpieces 



Climaxing the evening with the 
singing of the "Gralsfeler" or 
Feast of the Holy Grail from Ri- 
chard Wagner's "Parsifal ", the 
Williams and Vassar College Glee 
Clubs presented a Joint concert, 
Saturday night In Skinner Hall at 
Poughkeepsle. 

This concert, the third in three 
weeks by the Glee Club was mark- 
ed by a predominance of German 
music. All the Joint numbers and 
the seven numbers sung by the 
Vassar club were by German com- 
posers. 

^Williams Presentations 

The Williams Glee Club pre- 
sented four of its repertoire Inclu- 
ding works by Bach and Ingegneri 
an English folksong, "The Tur- 
tle Dove" and the popular "Simon 
Legree" by Douglas Moore. In 
addition to the Wagner, the com- 
bined choruses sang the "Chorus 
of Homage" and "O Lovely May" 
^y Brahnu. 



Acceptance of the house as- 
sessment for Spring liouseparty, 
rules concerning cars, fireworks, 
and Entertainment Committee and 
parties were among the leading 
itetfis of business at the UC meet- 
ing last Monday night at the 
house of President James P- Bax- 
ter 3rd. 

Discussion by President Baxter 
of the college's problems of cutt- 
ing down to pre-war size revealed 
to the UC the college's position. 
In coimection with the reduction 
of the college and the accompany- 
ing Increase of the fraternity bills, 
because of certain fixed costs. 
Dean Brooks suggested that the 
houses look into the possibilities 
of large-scale, cooperative buying 
for some or all of the social units. 
Cars and Fireworks 

Stuart Cool, head of the Disci- 
pline Committee, presented two 
rules recently passed by the com- 
mittee. The freshmen and soph- 
omores who use cars for various 
activities such as UWF and the 
Glee Club should from now on use 
cars belonging to Juniors and 
seniors. The penalty for the use 
of fireworks is a minimum of one 
month on Disciplinary Warning. 

Walter Stern, chairman of the 
Entertainment Committee, point- 
ed out the inadequacies of the 
one-week rule for parties. Under 
this rule, houses had to notify 
Stern a week before the date of 
the party. A new rule was pro- 
posed and adopted that the time 
would be a three-day notice to 
Stei'n, and tiiat this three-day 
limit would be strictly enforced. 
Rushing Sutceotions 

The revitalized Purple Key Con- 
stitution will be voted on this 
Thursday. UC President Andrew 
Heineman announced. The Bow- 
doin Plan was accepted by the UC, 
as was the plan to assess each 
See UC, Page 4 



'AH That Ghtters' Shiner 
For Cap and Bells, Cast 



"Glitters" Casl 




The cast and chorus of the new Sondheim Musicol, "All That Glitters," 
which ended a four night run before standing room only audiences in the 
Adams Memorial Theater last night. 



Marcel Breuer Lectures On 
Bases Of Modern Architecture 



"The important thing is to understand the principles and the 
mentality behind form, rather than the superficial form itself, ' 
stated Marcel Breuer, famous modern architect and Harvard pro- 
fessor, in a lecture in Lawrence Hall on Friday afternoon, March 18. 
Mr. Breuer expressed the opinion that most of the current 

knowledge of the so-called "func-^^ 

tlonal approach" is a vogue which 
only touches the surface of the 
new architecture. To clarify the 
origins of the modern movement, 
he outlined four basic instincts 
which underlie it. 

Creation Without Tradition 

The first of these, according to 
Mr. Breuer, is the solution of ar- 
ch'tectual problems directly with- 
out resorting to tradition, a reac- 
tion against older methods which 
l>egan after the first World War. 
Modern architects, hawever. are 
not against tradition, he explain- 
ed. Rather, they are working to- 
ward a new tradition. 

Secondly, he emphasized the 



new importance of clarity, of sing- 
leness of idea, in both form and 
I structure. 



Segovia, Spanish Guitarist, 
Entrances Chapin Audience 



by Walter C. Allen 

Last Thursday evening the Thompson Concert Committee pre- 
sented in Chapin Hall the eminent .'Spanish guitarist, Andres Sego- 
via, before an enthusiastic audience. 

Segovia's skill is really amazing. His reputation is great but 
one has to hear him to believe tliat a guitar can be played 

with such effect. The resemblance^ 

of the Instrument to the harpsi- , thms of Spanish music 
chord in sound Is more than super ] fully caught by 
flclal, 



beauti- 
Segovia. made 
since the method of tone 1 these works fascinating. One, a 



production is very similar. None- 
theless, the "Suite in D " by Ro- 
bert de Vlseo, guitarist and lute- 
nlst to the Court of Louis XIV. 
was remarkably similar In sound 
(and form) to the early French 
harpsichord suite. Segovia captur- 
ed his audience with this opening 
work, and held it throughout a 
very Interesting program. 
Technique Brilliant 

Works by Scarlatti, Bach and 
Fernando Sor made up the rest 
of the first group. Segovia's tech- 
nique here was trufy brilliant, ex- 
pecially in the Bach gavotte, writ- 
ten originally for harpsichord. 
The weakness in these numbers 
was the irregularity of the tempo. 

In the playing of any instru- 
mental work of the late Baroque 
period the temp must be precise. 
Rltards between sections of the 
work are not necessary. Segovia 
had a tendency to Interrupt the 
smooth flow of the work with 
slight rltards. The tones produced, 
on the hand, were extraordinary. 
Furthermore, Segovia's remark- 
able skill in executing difficult po- 
lyphonic passages on the guitar 
was evident in this group. 

The next three works were by 
contemporary Spanish composers 
and all were dedicated to Segov- 
ia. The moodiness, the dreaminess 
and the a,bruptly changing rhy- 



"Cancion" by a young Spanish 
composer, Terroba was a work of 
unusually delicate lyricism. 
Etude A High Spot 

The high-spot on the program 
for this reviewer was the "Etude" 
by Francisco Tarreja. Here again 
Segovia's technical skill was ap- 
parent; and the work Itself was 
an extremely difficult study, con- 
taining an extended melody of 
gieat beauty against a figured 
background. 

Following the intermission, Se- 
govia played a group of numbers 
by late nineteenth century Span- 
ish composers. The most effec- 
tive member of the group was the 
famous "Danza in E" by Enrique 
Granados. magnificently perfor- 
med. 

Concert Successful 

On the whole it was a very suc- 
cessful concert. The fantastic 
technique and tone demonstrated 
far outweighed the occasional 
liidifference to tempo. This re- 
viewer, once dubious about the 
idea of a guitar as a concert in- 
strument, is dubious no longer. 

On April 18 the Thompson Con- 
cert Committee will present the 
last concert of the current >«eason, 
a recital by Martial Slngher, dis- 
tinguished French baritone and 
member of the Metropolitan Op- 
era Company. 



'Rainbow' Tops 
Latest Musical 



Creation With Elenlents 

Illustrating his points with a 
series of sketches, Mr. Breuer 
pointed out the tendency of mo- 
dern architects to solve their 
building problzmr. by means of 
Juxtaposed basic elements, elimi- 
nating the in-betweens which 
have characterized architecture in 
the past. 

Closely allied to this, he stated, 
is the new use of contrasts, of 
structural fojms, of living con- 
cepts, and of colors and patterns 
in interior decorating. It is the in- 
tellectual approach and not the 
functional, an idea apart from 
materials, which must lead to an 
understanding of modern archi- 
tecture, he stated in conclusion. 

A discussion period followed the 
talk, in which Mr. Breuer answer- 
ed questions concerning the mo- 
dern house which he designed re- 
cently on the road to Bennington. 

Foreign Trade 
Lauded By Stark 

"Busini'ss Tough, But 
Rewards Are High" 

"Foreign trade is a tough, high- 
ly competitive .business, but its 
rewards are extremely good for 
those who can make the grade," 
John E. Stark '39. Assistant Sec- 
retary, of W. R. Grace and Co., 
told undergraduates during the 
fourth of the current series of vo- 
cational guidance talks at the 
Phi Gam house Monday night. 

There are two prime prere- 
quisites for success in the field. 
Stark said: first, an ability to 
handle numbers, and second, an 
ability to speak and write clearly 
and concisely. A working know- 
ledge of a foreign language is also 
very helpful, he added. 

The United States Is the only 
country in the world which can 
produce more than is needed at 
home. Stark stated; the foreign 
trade outlook is therefore still 
very good, despite the world-wide 
dollar shortage. The field is get- 
ting more and more crowded, 
however, and increasingly no dur- 
ing the past few years, but there 
is always room if you are good, 
he concluded. ,; 



Mrs. Dissell, Luthy 
Get Acting Honors 

By Edwin N. Perrin 

"All That Glitters", a musical 
version of "Beggar on Horseback" 
presented at the AMT, March 18. 
19, 21, and 22, tells the story of 
Neil McRae, a talented young 
composer. Neil, torn between love 
in a garret and being loved in a 
mansion, finally decides in favor 
of honest garrets. The body of 
the play is a long dream- 
sequence wherein Neil imagines 
himself married to that heiress 
of all that is wor.st in America. 
Gladys Cady. Such a play, of 
course, affords wonderful oppor- 
tunities for satire, many of which 
were realized in the Sondheim 
musical. As long as the play stuck 
to parody and satire it was good in 
deed, but the "straight" scenes 
were disappointing. 

The prologue fulfilled its in- 
troductory function adequately: 
the first act wa.s an improvement, 
and the .second act excellent. The 
epilogue, however, was atrocious. 
Obviously the curtain had to be 
gotten down .somehow, but I re- 
fuse to believe that it could not 
have been done more skillfully. 
The note of "reality" in the epilo- 
gue was for more fantastic than 
the wiidcai ol Noir.s Urcanis. 

Too Much Love 

There were too many love seq- 
uences, and I. for one. dared to 
hope each time Neil called 
for his true-love Cvnthia. that 
just this once she would fail to 
materialize. The idyllic young- 
married scene between Neil and 
Cynthia was. I fear, unintentional 
burlesque. But the intended sa- 
tire was generally good. Cady's 
Art Factory, in particular, was 
superb: and. while hardly Ballet 
Russe, the chess Pantomine seem- 
ed clever and appropriate. 

In the second act, Mr. Cady 
proclaims that the unwashed 
masses want tunes they can whis- 
tle. As a single unwashed indivi- 
dual, so do I, knd I didn't get 
them in "All That Glitters". "Lets 
Not Fall In Love" was good — 
perhaps the best of the love songs 
— and "Bordelaise", a take-off on 
Cole Porter among other things, 
was good enough. I think, to 
See GLITTERS. Page 4 



Two Coticerts 
For Glee Club 



Plan Bronxville, Radio 

Networli Programs 



Singing in their fourth and fifth 
concerts of the season, the Wil- 
liams Glee Club will present two 
programs this weekend, one at 
Bronxville. New Yofk on Satur- 
day, and the other over the Yan- 
kee Network Sunday. 

The Glee Club, under the di- 
rection of Professor Robert Bar- 
row, will be assisted in their 
Bronxville appearance by Miss 
Helen Merrltt, soprano. Miss Mer- 
rltt will sing a group of five num- 
bers including works by Gluck 
and Handel and will Join with the 
Glee Club in Beethoven's "O Tri- 
umph All ye Ransomed " and "A 
Song of Soldiers." 

Among some of the works' that 
the group will perform are: "Ten- 
ebrae Pactae Sunt" by Palestring; 
"In Death's Strong Grasp the 
Savior Lay" by Bach; "Plow My 
Tears" by Dowland;,"Hark, All 
See CONCERTS, Page 4 




^tre Wnilijg^^ J^iotJ^ 



North Adams, Mossochusetts 



Williomstown, Mossochusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, ot the post office ot 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of Morch 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter,. Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Ha|l, Williomstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113)- Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 ,. . ,- ... 

Norman S. Wood '50 Managing Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) News Editor 

Lansina G. Scofield '50 c . cj-*« 

Walter P. Stern '50 Sports Editors 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Associate Editors; 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delany, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R Hastings. 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. 
Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 _ . .. 

Edward L Stockhouse '50 , Business Manager 

Harry Frozier, III '51 - Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 ', Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 .^< Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 ....^.-.<. Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Ganyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegcl, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moil, H. Voorhrs. ' 1952- A. Belt, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Noson, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD,' WEDNESDAY, MARCH ^£3', 1^^ 



Letters To The Editor 



SK 



To The Editor of the Williams Record: 

In view of the fact that over-zealous copy writers In the ads 
In your paper, as well as In other forms of campus advertising such 
as WMS and handbills, have been mistaken In some of their material, 
I would appreciate It if you would clear up the (acts by printing this 
letter.' . _ _, 

1) The Purple Knights have not played at the Williams Inn at 
any time in the past school year, and are not contemplating doing 
so in the near future. 

2) The Purple Knights have not played over WMS at any time in 
the past schooli'year, and also are not contemplating doing so In the 
near future. 

3) The small combos that have played at the Inn and over WMS 
under the name "Purple Knights" have not been authorized to use 
this name. Because at times some members of the "Knights" have 
played with these small groups and have been recognized as "Knights" 
members by announcers and copywriters, this situation has arisen. 

4) The Purple Knights have played this year at Mount Holyoke, 
Wheaton, Emma Willards School, The Plttsfleld Sheraton Hotel, and 
a Theta Delt-Beta dance this. past houseparty. 

March 15 Wally Oleson, Leader 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 




2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. 



North Adonii 



Volume XLIU 



MARCH 23, 1949 



Number 6 



Purple Key Reorganization 

Congratulations to the Purple Key Society for its proposed re- 
organization which, if passed by that organization and by the UC, 
ought to bring the group out of the depths and into a position of 
respect and responsibility on the campus. 

At present the Purple Key is composed of all the head, assistant, 
and freshman managers. According to the proposed new constitution, 
its membership would be comprised of the head managers of varsity 
sports, captains and co-captains of varsity sports, a representative 
elected by the intramural managers, and the members of the newly 
organized UC Athletic Committee. As a result the organization will 
Include those men with the most responsible positions having to do 
<fith athletics, rather than principally of men with, by and large, 
relatively minor positions and who, even as a group, can swing very 
little weight in influential circles. It would be a society for the im- 
provement of the entire athletic situation, rather than a strictly 
managerial society, and a poor managerial society at that. 

Such an organization would be much more than a reception com- 
mittee for visiting teams and a group to take care of the problems 
incident to managerial duties, although it would also include these 
two things. Its province would be the athletic scene as a whole. It 
would investigate this entire field and make recommendations to 
the Athletic Council and to the UC on matters pertaining to the 
betterment ot Williams athletics as well as act as a sounding 
board to reflect student opinion land itself be active in determining 
that opinion.) 

A Fouled Up Situation 

In the recent past, the athletic situation has been the most 
fouled up affair in the college administration, and a strong and re- 
sponsible student hand in that department can go a long way toward 
initiating and carrying out remedial action. This new group ought 
to work hand in glove with new Athletic Director John Jay, for many 
of their problems will be mutual ones, and they can be of great 
benefit to each other. 

Of course the nine-man Athletic Council will still have the 
final say, but this is necessary because so many of the problems 
involve financial considerations. This Council is composed of three 
students, three alumni, and three members of the faculty or admin- 
istration. The student members are the President ot the Purple 
Key and representatives elected by the captains and the UC. 

These student representatives would still be representing the 
same groups — managers, captains, and UC — but they could all 
be held effectively responsible to the same organization, whereas 
before they served as Individuals and not, really, as representatives 
of any group. The discussions and decisions of the Athletic Council 
were never reported back to the students, who are the ones im- 
mediately concerned with them and for whose benefit they were 
theoretically made. This would give considerably more weight to 
student opinion on the Athletic Council, and, after all, it is the 
students who are most directly concerned. They are the ones in 
touch with the immediate situation and. consequently, should be 
the ones most anxious and most capable of providing constructive 
criticism. 

With this widened range of activity, the Purple Key will necess- 
arily come more closely under the jurisdiction of the UC, so that 
those two bodies may be as closely coordinated as is possible and 
so that the Purple Key may get effective UC support whenever 
necessary. This is planned to take the form of membership in the 
organization for the UC's Athletic Committee. 



The Clip Board 

PARTY UP — A North Adams group Interested In the problems of 
alcoholism recently announced a meeting to found a chapter of 
Alchoholics Anonymous in that notoriously sober town. The an- 
nouncement ended: "Coffee will be served after Sunday's meeting, 
and a social hour will follow." 

FUN WITH FOOD— A headline from a recent copy of the Boston 
Herald: 

WINS BET, LOSES LIFE 
"MADRID, Spain, Thursday lAP) - Santiago Gomez Parra 
bet his friends he could eat more than they. He won by 
eating a meal that weighed 10 pounds, then fell over dead 
from indigestion." 
Another item from the same sheet reads: 

" "Criticizes His Host's Cooking at Party; 
He'll Be Buried Tomorrow" 
The guest. Cristobal Baillo, criticized the cooking at host Tomas 
Rosallo's birthday party. Rosalie became so incensed that he killed 
Baillo with a butcher knife. 

ALL FOR ART - Margaret Truman has been named "woman of the 
year " by the Harvard Hasty Pudding Club and invited to become the 
first woman in the club's 101-year history to sing in one of Its shows. 
A letter saluted Miss Truman for her "great courage and devotion 
to the arts in pursuing your singing and operatic career to the ex- 
clusion of the Washington Social whirl." 

SOURED UP - The executive committee of the students' association 
at Victoria University College, New Zealand, voted not long ago to 
send a letter to Czechoslovakia's Communist Prime Minister on "the 
triumph of democracy" there. They said it was done facetiously, but 
the students weren't laughing. At a mass meeting they voted the 
executive committee out of office. 

$100,000 JOKE - A post-grad student at UCLA was arrested outside 
the campus library with the Bay Psalm Book, a volume valued at 
$100,000. in his hand. He told police that the theft was Just a 
"prank, " part of a fraternity initiation stunt. The story concluded: 
"The charges were filed yesterday." 

SHORT ON CASH - Buffalo's share of the gifts sent from France 
on the Freedom Gratitude Train is currently residing In the offices 
of the local Express company. Mayor Bernard J. Dowd said he had 
no city funds to pay the $154.16 express charges. 

OLD SHOES - Orville Wrights heirs have demanded the return of 
10 pairs of the inventor's shoes by Goodwill Industries, which was to 
.sell them at auction. The shoes, they said, should be disposed of 
quietly, "in keeping with the retiring spirit manifested by Orville 
Wright throughout his life." 



Evaluation Of A Coed 



CROWDED HOTELS 

— Needn't worry Williams undergraduates, dion^ is 
ore there's room for you at the Williams Clyb — at 
special rotes, too. No Curfew. 

All this plus fine meals and drinks, LaJies Dining Ro- n 
and Cocktail Lounge for dates, theatre ticket servif j. 

\ "^he Williams Glub 

24 East 39th St., New York City • 
Undergraduates are always welcomel 
It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



STEELE and WILI S 
GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTlVt 
SERVICE 

BODY and FENDER WORK 

MOTOR OVERHAULING 

Talaphon* 499-M 

41 Williomitowii 

Spring St. Matt. 



Tel. 302-M 
Williamstown 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 

GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Marcella and Frank Ikeler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 

Route 2 
Opposite Howard Johnsons 



I From the Rollins College paper) 



Spring Houseparty 

The long-awaited cut in the cost of college dances has finally 
come. In planning for the Spring Houseparty. the Junior Class com- 
mittee has hit upon the idea of jJutting a wooden platform on the 
Lab campus and making the dance an outdoor affair. This is not 
only welcomed as a pleasant nd nOvel innovation but as a great aid 
to the pocketbook, which is never very fat at houseparty time. 

Having the dance outside eliminates the cost of tickets, ticket- 
takers, taxes, bouncers, and gym decorations. Because the dance floor 
will be open for all students to come and go as they please, and be- 
cause the financial demands will be met through a house tax, the 
bands can be chosen for their ability to play good music and not for 
a big name to use as a drawing card. All' this, together with the fact 
that it will be run as a non-profit affair, adds up to a considerable 
monetary saving for all who attend. 

All this hinges on the acc^tance by every house of the flat $100 
tax. How the houses want to levy the assessment on their individual 
members is up to them, but It seems logical that it should hit evei*y 
man with a date or every man who stays in town. With the dance 
floor open to all, It Is expected that everyone will show up at one 
ttme or another. 



If she's o freshman 

She blushes 
naughty jokes. 

She says, "Oh 
please stop thot." 

She wonts to mar- 
ry a football ploy- 



mid 



She thinks 
night is idte. 

She reads "What 
every young girl 
should know 

She won't date a 
boy who hos ever 
hod drink. 

She tells her moth- 
er everything. 

She likes to smooch 

Her motto: Moth- 
er Knows Best. 



She drinX's Cokes 
on a date. 



Sophomore 

She smiles 
naughty jokes. 

She says, 
please step." 



'Oh 



She wants to mar 
ry a movie star. 

She thinks mid' 
night is pretty late 

"How to Win 
Friends and Influ- 
ence People," 

She won't dote a 
boy who has just 
had a drink. 

She tells her room- 
mate everything. 

She likes to smooch 

Her motto: Death 
Before Dishonor. 

She drinks pink 
adies on a dote. 



Junior 

She loughs 
naughty jokes. 



"Oh, 



She says, 
please." 

She wants to mar- 
ry capitalist. 

She thinks mid- 
night isn't so late. 

'The Art of love." 



She 'won'! date o 
boy who has hod 
over one drink. 

She tells her diary 
everything. 

She likes to smooch 

Her motto: Noth- 
ing ventured noth- 
ing gained. 

She drinks high- 
balls on a dote. 



Senior 

S|ie tells naughty 
jokes. 

She soys, "Oh." 



Tennis, Track 
Golf Schedules 



Varsity Golf 



April 23 
April 29 
April 30 
May 7 



Hofstra 
Bowdoln 
Hamilton 
Mlddlebury 

May 13-15 NE at Boston 

May 19 Harvard 

May 21 Army 

May 25 RPI 

May 26 Amherst 

May 28 Wesleyan 
FroRh 

April 27 Hotchkiss 



She wonts to mor- 
ry o man. 

She thinks mid- 
night is midnight. 

"Care and Feeding 
of Intants." 

She won't date o 
boy unless he 
drinks. 

She doesn't tell a 
damn thing. 

She likes lo smooch 

Her motto; Boys 
will be boys 

She - drinks ony- 
thing, onytime, 

onywhet'e. 

^ A 




A SUCCESSFUL PARTY 



Must be adequate- 
ly provided for. 



To complete your Party Preparations 

• Hand-pointed troys 

• Famous German PILSNER 
Beer Glasses with Crests 

• Hand-blocked Linen Cocktail 
Napkins 

• Cocktail Barware 

Country Shop, North St., Williamstown 




Keeping Williams men worm has been our business for 
many yeors. We supply both the coal and the fuel oil 
that is used in Williams fraternity houses. 

THOMAS McMAHON AND SON 

73 Spring Street 



May 21 Arfny 
May 28 Amherst 

Varsity Tennis 
Princeton 
Army 
Bowdoln 
North Carolina 
Springfield 
MIT 
Dartmouth 
May 13, 14, 15 Intercolleglates 
May 18 Wesleyan 
Harvard 
Dartmouth 
Yale 
Amherst 

Frosh * 

Hotchkiss 
Harvard 



April 16 
April 23 
April 29 
May 2 
May 3 
May 6 
May 11 



May 21 
May 23 
May 26 
May 28 

April 27 
May 14 



A 
A 
H 
H 
A 
H 
A 
H 
H 
H 
A 
A 
A 

a' 

H 



WaAj 



(ontains Viratol 



NIW FORMULA WITH VIRATOl* 

works wonders in the 
looks of your hair. 
It looks natural . . . 
it feels natural . . . 
and it stays in 
place I Tryat>ottle. 



*T6is sptcial nrnpomnJ givis Imlrt . . . 
inps hair in pUa wilhtut stlffnm. 




Mm, 




Uuj^mJu 




See SCHEDULES, Page 3 



new Vaseline cream hair tonic 



:.;f 



X. 



"M: 



;i!ji.v'.'.*'^';?!«5i„:,;t!t..vi,a. 




'AJmie!i*'L^'^i:k&iM.'ii.i&i^.i>ifl:i meii^ 



"9!<^' 



'Vy;y/:'-~-*r{!riSi^^^Wf^pi^^f^ ^ri^iif./ j't'^^., ■** ?•>?''■';>■- ^>, 





■•m" 



■-?i«^W?P*S^W' ■ 



THE WILLI AWIS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 1949 



Bob R«id and Morgan Murray, co-coptain> elect of the iwimming team. 



Reid, Murray 
Lead Muirmen 



Reid A Distance Man; 
Murray Swims Dash 



Bob Reid, '50, one co-captaln of 
next year's swimming team, hails 
from Cincinnati, Ohio, and atten- 
ded Governor Dummer Academy. 
He has been a star swimmer 
throughout his Williams career, 
particularly In the 220- and 440- 
yard distances. He is a member of 
Beta Theta PI fraternity. 

Morgan Murray, '50, a DU Is 



the other co-captaln of next year's 
swimming team. He comes from 
Kew Gardens, N.Y. and graduated 
from Hotchklss in 1946 where his 
swimming prowess won him' a 
Place on the Prep School AU- 
Amerlcan Team. During the whole 
of his swimming career at Will- 
lams, Murray has been a member 
of the varsity swimming team, 
specializing In the 50- and IQO- 
yard distances. / 




Spring 
Vacations 



Mile Relay /Snares 
I'hird <At Cleveland 

In a post season effort at 
the Cleveland K. of C. Meet 
last Friday night, the mile re- 
jay team completed their sea- 
son by garnering a respectable 
third place behind teams from 
Baldwin-Wallace, and Pitts- 
burgh. The ten college mile re- 
lay teams were divided into 
two sections with the Purple 
quartet placed in the fastest 
company. Their race was won 
in 3:27.7, a record brealiing 
time for the poor track, while 
the leader in the second section 
was clocked in 3:32. Ephmen 
Bill Barney, Walt Zleganhals. 
and Gordy Smith closely trail- 
ed the first three teams and 
then anchorman Kev Delany 
nipped Michigan Normal's last 
runner to grab third place, 
ten yards behind the winner. 



You add hours at both ends of 
vacation when you go by train. 
Relax in a comfortable coach 
seat, or sleep the miles away in 
your berth while you speed 
homeward. Returning, leave 
later , , . with confidence tliat 
you won't miss a class. 

Come back after vacation on 
a "College Special" . . . then 
return home at the end of the 
college year. Enjoy stopover 
privileges permitted by 10-day 
transit limit in both directions, 
if you wish. 




from 

rail travel cosis 

See your home town ticket 
agent about "CollegeSpecials." 
They give you the advantage 
of available reduced round-trip 
fares . . . with a return time 
limit lo{ig enough to cover the 
whole spring term. 

Your railroad ticket agent 
at home will have these special 
tickets for teachers and stu- 
dents. He'll be glad to help you 
with your travel plans. 



For a Time and 
Mone'y-Saving Trip 

Gqhfhrm 

IT'b CONVENIENT- 
COMFORTABLE— SAFE 

AMERICAN 
RAILROAiy 








SCHEDULES - - - 




May 18 Wesleyan 


H 


May 21 Army 


A 


May 25 Kent 


H 


May 28 Affiher.st 


A 


Varsity Track 




April 23 RPI 


A 


April 27 U. of Mass. 


H 


April 30 Wesleyan 


H 


May 6 Amlierst 


A 




Dave Pynchon, newly elec^M cap- 
>oin of nexf yeor's hockey^ team. 




Reid,Lanifeert, Wineman Euter 
National Intercoliegiale Meet 



Lacrossemen 
Face Tough 
'49 Struggle 

Soullicrn Trip Planned; 
l<ruah, Seventeen 
Leltenueii lieturn 



George Ditmor, who wos chosen 
lost week to leod the '49-'50 basket- 
ball teom. 



Hockef Elects 

Dqxie Pynchon 

X 

' Dave Pynchon will lead the Eph 
hockey sextet through the '49- 
'50 season succeeding this year's 
co-captains Charlie Huntington 
and Tom Benson. Pynchon has 
excelled in the nets for the Pur- 
ple, besides being a member of 
the varsity lacrosse team and liav- 
Ing played freshman hockey and 
lacrosse. Active in his other posts, 
president of DU, secretary of the 
Undergraduate Council, and jun- 
ior advisor, Dave came to Wil- 
liams form Newton High of New- 
ton Highlands, Massachusetts, 
where he was graduated in 1945. 



Quintet Elects 
George Ditmar 



George Ditmar, newly elected 
captain of next year's basketball 
squad, succeeds Jack Mason in 
the post of quintet chief. A gradu- 
ate of Pittsfield High School 
where he demonstrated outstand- 
ing athletic ability, Ditmar is cur- 
rently a member of Delta Upsi- 
lon and a junior advipor. George 
has been of great value to both 
the varsity basketball team and 
the baseball nine's mound staff 
since he has been at Williams, be- 
sides having served on the honor 

i system committee during his fresh 

j man year. 



See SCHEDULES, Page 4 




SHOES 
CAN BE 
KEPT NEW 
THROUGH REPAIR 

TRY 

LUPO'S 

for 
SHOE REPAIRING 

ALWAYS READY TO 
SERVE WILLIAMS MEN 
WITH 24 HOUR SERVICE 




-^spc 



n 



COLORADO 

SPRING SKIING 

unsurpassed 

ALL EXPENSE SKI WEEK 

beginning 

March 27, April 3. 10, 17 

ending 

April 2, 9, 16, 23 

BUNK ROOM 

AND MEALS ''$36:00 

BUNK ROOM 

MEALS & LIFT $57.50 

BUNK ROOM 

MEALS, LIFTS & 

SKI LESSONS $70.00 

For reservation & information 
write or wire: 

HOTEL JEROME 
ASPEN, COLORADO 



Coach Harvey Potter's 1949 ver- 
sion of the Williams lacrosse team 
will tackle one of the toughest 
schedules of its history thfs 
Spring with its first game in one 
and a half weeks. 

The stickmen will open the 
season with a five-game southern 
trip beginning April 4. The trip 
will feature games with Navy, 
Maryland, Loyala, Delaware and 
Duke. This will be a rugged test 
for the team which is at present 
unable to do any strenuous prac- 
ticing due to the snow and wet 
condition of the field. 

On April 16, the Purple will 
swing into an eight game season, 
with the toughest games against 
Harvard, Yale, and Dartmouth. 
Games with Tufts, MIT, and a 
home-and-home series with Union 
round out the schedule. There is 
a possibility of playing two prac- 
tice games with RPI. the "Olym- 
pic" representatives of the United 
States last summer. 

Returning Veterans 

Coach Potter will have seven- 
teen returning lettermen around 
which to build his team. Valuable 
additions from last year's Fresh- 
men are sure to strengthen the 
squad. At attack will be reliable 
veterans Pat Graney and Ed May- 
nard, last year's Co-captains, with 
the probable addition of Gordy 
McWilliams, former Deerfield star. 
Dave Van Alstyne also played on 
last year's Varsity. At the mid- 
field positions return Captain 
Austy Taliaferro, Phil Van Dusen. 
and Buz Brumbaugh. Dave Pyn 
chon, Ronnie Chute, and Coke 
Scofield also saw considerable ac 
tion last season. 

The whole first string defense 
returns this year led by veteran 
Howie Simpson. Bob Donoho and 
Mark Reynolds complete this 
tight combination. Also likely to 
see action are Dave Young. Bill 
Coldwell, Dick Hastings, and Bob 
Geneisse. Tending the nets for the 
Ephs will be the veteran Mickey 
O'Connell. To back him up arc 
I Phil Boote. Gene Foley, and Herb 
Poole. 



Top US Swimmers 
In Chapel Hill Meet 



Williams' hopes for national 
swimming honors will ride with 
the churning arms of Hank Wine- 
man in the 150 yd. back, Sandy 
Lambert in the 1600 meter free 
style, and Bob Reid in the 220 and 
440 as the three aces journey to 
the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill this weekend to 
compete in the 1949 National In- 
tercollegiate Swimming Meet. 

With such stars as Alan Stack 
and Bill Heusner entered, there Is 
scant chance of any purple entry 
copping a first place, but Coach 
Bob Muir predicted that, "Each 
man has an excellent chance to 
be one of the six finalists in his 
events. Williams has never had 
any finer representation in the 
Nationals." 

AAU Veterans 

Big time competition will be 
nothing new to this trio. Last year 
in the National AAU Meet, Lam- 
bert placed second, Reid fourth, 
and Wineman fifth in their res- 
pective events. 

Stack of Yale, who has done 
1:30.8. is a sure winner in the 
150 yd. back, probably followed 
by his teammate Ratkiewicz. who 
won the Easterns in 1:37.8 but has 
done 1:35.5 in a dual meet. The 
remaining three places should be 
a toss-up between Wineman and 
a host of other 1:37 swimmers, in- 
cluding Patterson of Michigan 
State, the Weedon brothers of 
Stanford, De Groot of Ohio State 
and Coxhead of Colgate. 
Heusner Paces 

Heusner of Northwestern Univ- 
ersity tops the field in the 1500 
meter free style, which he won 
last year in 19:28. Micliigan's 
Mann and Stager, who placed 
with 19:39 and 19:41 respectively, 
will be .strong threats, along with 
Norris of Harvard, who won the 
Easterns this year in 19:40. Coach 
Muir stated that Lambert could 
be counted on to turn in at least 
a 19:45. 

Reid will have little chance in 
the 220, but may well place in the 
440. Although his best mark of 
the year, 4:54. does not compare 
favorably with Midwestern times, 
the big swimmer has never been 
pressed by anyone but his team- 
mate Lambert. Heusner. who won 
the Nationals last year in 4:49 flat 
will be back, along with Stager of 
Michigan. Mann of Michigan, and 
Watts of Iowa, all of whom have 
broken 4:51. 



Here'; Sam Donihue and Patti Mahar, i^ 

a 1«(nre<l singer with W» band, * 

««m|>aring notes «n Camel Mlliiness. 



I LEARNED 
FROM THE 30-DAy TEST 

THAT Camels are reall/ 

MILD AND HAVE A GRAND 
RICH, FULL FLAVOR, 
TOO 



9 



IVE KNOVVN 

that. for /ears, patsi. 
that's wh/ Camels 

ARE My FAVORITE 

cigarette/ 



ti\ 



\2 






^et 






are not convinced that Camels are the mildest cigarette you ever tmoked, 
return the package with the unuied Camels and we will refund In full 
purchase price, plus postage. (SignH) lU J. Rernoldi Tobacco €ompui7, 
Win*ton-S«lem. North CaroUiu. 



%:^ SmJ(\ can a s^'ma sotso^ fcc/ r 

Hear Sam Donahue playing 



(A CAPITOl RECORDING) 

• • • and you'll know! 

Sam Donahue's new waxing is a real something. Yes! It's 
smooth, it's swingy, it's something terrific for a fast Lindy — or 
what-do-you-do? In music, Sam knows that whether you dance 
it fast or slow — you'll want it smooth. And when it comes to 
cigarettes, Sam himself wants a cool, smooth-smoking cig- 
arette. That's why Sam says, "Camels suit my 'T-Zone' to a 'T'. 
Camels are the mildest cigarette I've ever smoked — and they 
taste great, too ! " 

4lov^/!5!lS 02^r\ a cigarette be/? 

Smoke CAMELS for 30 DAYS 
—and you'll know! 

In a recent coast-to-coast test of hundreds of men and women 
who smoked only Camels for 30 days — aft--average of one to 
two packs a day — noted throat specialists, after making weekly 
examinations, reported 

MOT ONE SINGLE CASE OF THROAT 
IRRITATION DUE TO SMOKING 



fe.^;;^.::t:'^:.a,JH 







THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 1949 



Glitters • - - 

charm even Robert Scott Taylor 
But In general the songs were 
second-rate, reaching a nadir in 
"I Love You Et Cetera."- 1 would 
have enjoyed "That Good Old 
American Dollar" more if I had 
not seen "Allegro". 

To my mind, Betty Dissell car- 
ries off the acting honors. Her 
singing was exactly suited to the 
part of Gladys, while her spoken 
scenes may permanently preju- 
dice me against nightclubs and 
dancing. Not only in Bordelaise" 
and "I Need Love", but through- 
out the show Mrs. Dissell was 
consistently good. James Dissell 
handled what was perhaps the 
easiest major part in a profess- 
ional and entertaining way. As 
Homer he was thoroughly ob- 
noxious, and he made a fine pro- 
secutor: in general he earned 
more than his duota of laughs 
and was a credit to the Cady fam- 
ily. 

Luthy Good 

Martin Luthy, as Mr. Cady. 
turned a good performance and, 
as much as anyone, held the 
show together. His interpretation 
of the plump and plus-foured ty- 
coon makes a fine argument for 
any socialist. Caroline Bidwell. 
playing his wife, is a fitting help- 
mate for a widget king — and a 
living condemnation of the Amer- 
ican Mom. Among the minor 
characters, John Lasell stood out 
mo surprise) as the Poet, virtual- 
ly stealing one of the best scenes 
of the entire play. Jeanette Fois- 
ey, playing the poor-but-nice 
Cynthia, sang well, and acted not 
so well. Howie Erskine. in the 
role of Albert Rice, gave his us- 
ual capable performance. 

The hero of "All That Glitters", 
Neil McRae. was played by Ron- 
ald Moir. Though neither his 
singing nor his acting was on the 
heroic scale, he did well in a dif- 
ficult part and managed to make 
Neil a sympathetic character. At 
worst, it is not Moir's fault if 
"When I See You" sounds like 
the product of an early, imperfect 
Cady Art Factory. 

Better Last Year 

The sets, oddly enough, seemed 
good or bad in direct ratio to the 
quality of tire whole production. 
That is, they ranged from the 
mediocre garret of Neil's real life 
to the very excellent pillared 
dream-house of the Cadys. 



The best basis of comparison 
for this play would probably be I 
>ast ybar's hit, "Phinney's Rain- 
bow" — and in such a comparison 
the 1949 entrant comes out a clear 
loser. The reason, I think, is not 
entirely that "Phinney's Rainbow" 
had local reference while "All 
That Glitters" is more ambitious 
in its scope. It is not even that 
Josiah T. S. has graduated. The 
answer, I think, is this: "Phin- 
ney's Rainbow" made no attempt 
to be Serious Art; it was satirical 
throughout, and even poked fun 
at its love interest. Sondheim's 
new musical, on the other hand, 
seeks to mix parody and social 
significance, to combine a straight 
romantic love affair with biting 
satire. To me it seems an unsta- 
ble compound, and I believe that 
the play would have been Jjetter 
had it stuck to parody.. 

In writing this^'view, I barely 
withstood thflji-temptation to say 
that "All fhat Glitters" is not 
gold; so having spared you (until 
the last paragraph) so cheap a 
witticism. I shall close by saying 
that it is by no means all dross, 
either. 



Debaters To Battle 

Columbia, Amherst 




WED thru SAT 



CARYJRANT 




♦ ADDED FEATURE ♦ 

TIERNEY LANE ^ 

tmimj 



tciMic 



Evening! continuous from 6:30 pm 

ENDS WEDNESDAY 

Rosalind Russell — Leo Genn 

VELVET TOUCH 

Feofure at 6:40 - 8:40 

THURSDAY 

Great Sea Melodrama 

THE RAIDER 

Feoture at 7:00 - 9:00 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Dick Powell — Morta Toren 

ROGUE'S REGIMENT 

Feature at 6:50 - 8:50 



SCHEDULES - - - 

May 14 Easterns at Springfield 
May n , U. of Conn. A 

May 21 NE at Boston 



The prestige of small colleges in 
general and 'Williams in parti- 
cular will be at stake on March 25 
as debaters Frederick Peyser '50 
and Edward Stack '51 journey to 
Columbia to argue the question 
"Resolved: that a Liberal Arts 
education can better be obtained 
at a college than a university." 

Freshmen Daniel Comiskey and 
Henry Pickard will take the neg- 
ative against an Amherst pair 
March 24 on the question "Re- 
solved: that the Communist Par- 
ty in the U.S. should be outlawed." 
The debate will be held in the 
Sigma Phi house at 8:30 p.m. 



Concerts • • • 

Ye Lovely Saints" by Weelkes; 
"The Dirge for Two Veterans" by 
Hoist; "Simon Lagree" by Moore; 
and "WlUlamsiana," a choral 
work }>y Prof. Barrow based up- 
on Williams songs. The program 
will be sponsored by the Bronx- 
viUe Junior League. 

Network Broadcast 

On Sunday afternoon at 4:30 
the Glee Club will present a half- 
hour broadcast over the Yankee 
Network. The radio program is 
sponsored by the MonsantoChem- 
ical Company. 

Earlier during the current 
season the Glee Club appeared at 
Smith, Vassar and Bennington. 
Their next to' the last appearance 
of the year will be made in Wil- 
Uamstown on April 30 when they 
wfll present a joint concert with 





Frosh 




April 28 


Mass. State 


A 


May 7 


RPI 


H 


May n 


Little Three 


H 



HOPKINS 

FURNITURE 
STORE 

Furnishings for all the room 

Large size mahogany & maple coffee fables 

$16.50 
• Round Troys 98C 

• Heavy base glasses 

highballs Sr old fashioned 
cockfail glasses $4.00 doz. 
• Plastic table clothes 

• New oil cloth 79c a yard 

Serving Williams Men Since 1888 



UC-. 

house $100 and the Garfield Club 
$200 In order to pay for the dance 
to be run by the Junior class on 
Spring houseparty weekend. The 
slate of nominations made last 
Wednesday for UC Committees 
was passed. 

Rushing Committee chairman 
John Griggs made tlie suggestion 
that all houses would ask men to 
the house for a flrst-peripd bid 
next fall. This would mean about 
sixteen men to a house during 
first period. Also set aside until 
a meeting of the complete Rush- 
ing Committee Was a recommen- 
dation that the speech on rush- 
ing next fall be given by the 
Rushing Arbiter, and that there 
would be available at that time 
information on certain houses 
with discrimination clauses, in or- 
der to avoid embarassment among 
the freshmen being rushed. 



the Wellesley College Glee Club, 
The season will end with a solo 
appearance in Town Hall, New 
York May 12. This will be the Glee 
Club's first solo effort in New 
York since the beginning of World 
War II. 



WEST'S FILLING 
STATION 

• Oil Change 

• Grease Job 

• Gas 

End of Spring Street 



WE SELL 
A SERVICE 

Some business firms sell « 
"good", such as food or,! 
clothing; others sell a "ser 
vice". As a bonk, "we n.i 
only carry your checking oi 
count and rent safe depos 
boxes, but we also provio 
such services as the sole t 
government bonds, and tr(. 
velers checks and the issi 
ing of cashiers checks. 

Whenever you hove a bant 
ing problem, we ore race! 
to help you. 



WILLIAMSTOWN 

NATIONAL 

BANK 



Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 




MORE COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE 

CHESTERFIELDS THAN ANY OTHER CIGAREHE 



•■■pnifht 1949. LmMrt k I 



I TofAfro C. 



BY UTEST NATIONAL SURVEY 



fb^WJilli 



Vofume XLIII, Number 7 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



Army To Cut Draft 
Until June, 1950 




J$.J^1^0fj^ 



SATU'RDAY, MARCH 26, 1949 



Price 10 cents 



Big Increases 
In Enlistments 
Bring Holiday- 
Draft Eligibles Secure, 
Present Service Act 
Kuns Out Next Year 



Another relief to local draft bait 
came Tuesday when Maj. Gen. 
John A. Dahlqulst, chief of Army 
personnel, disclosed to a House 
subcomlttee that the current draft 
holiday will be extended through 
June, 1950, If voluntary enlist- 
ments continue at the present 
rate. The drafting of more men 
after that date would require the 
passing of a new draft law, for 
the current Selective Service Act 
expires June 30, 1950. 

According to the New York 
"Times." the "Army has been the 
only branch of the service to u.se 
the new law enacted in September. 
It has made no calls for draf- 
tees since January. ' 

"Tlie National Military Estab- 
bllshment was quick to emphasize, 
however, that continuation of the 
holiday depended on maintalr.ini; 
the present rate of voluntary en- 
enlistments. An official spokes- 
man said that Oeneraf bahlquist 
in expressing the opinion that the 
Army would make no further man 
power demands on the selective 
.service system, did not mean ihe 
draft law should be repealed. 

Stimulate Enlistments 

"The mere existence of the law, 
it was contended, has stimulated 
voluntary enlistments and is need- 
ed to Insure necessary replace- 
ments in the armed services. 

"Voluntary enlistments and re- 
enlistments in the Army are now 
running at about 35.000 a month 
This rate is considered sufficient 
to maintain that branch at the 
874.000 strength contemplated 
under President Truman's budget 
for the fiscal year beginning July 1 

"The only calls made on the 
.selective service system under the 
present draft law were for Nov- 
ember, December and January. A 
total of 29,328 have been drafted 
while 127,059 volunteers were in- 
ducted into the Army in the same 
three-month period. 

"The National Military Estab- 
lishment pointed out that 2,840 
of the 46,268 volunteering in Jan- 
uary were eighteen-year-olds who 
enlisted for one year under the 
K-rms of the 1947 draft law. The 
act thus helped to stimulate vol- 
untary recruiting, it was argued. 

"The ability to obtain sufficient 
recruits without drafting them was 
also credited partly to recent in- 
See DRAFT", Page 4 



Defunct Bookstore Slili 
Har$706 On'tstandhifi" 

The now defunct Student 
Bookstore still has $700 in out 
standing bills according to SAC 
President Schuyler Brooks '50. 
So far, only $200 of the original 
$900 owed to the store have 
been paid. 

' Brooks emphasized that until 
the SAC gets this money, it 
will not,-he-j*ble toj-eturn the 
$2 to,'(ljcjSg students who hold 
memlierships in the organiza- 
tion. He requested that any 
bills still outstanding be" paid 
to the Undergraduate Council, 
c/o Mr. Albert Osterhaut at the 
Old Faculty House as soon as 
possible. 



Jay Program 
Gives Thrills 
lo Ski Fans 



Winter Olympic Movie 
"Skis Over Europe" 
Lives Up To Notices 



Dartm'thDrops 
Six Students 



Cap and Bells 
Offer Mystery 

"The Late Caller" Aired 
By Dramatic Workshop 



The Cap and Bells Dramatic 
Workshop Players will present 
the next In their series of we^ly 
radio plays over 'WMS at B p.m. 
Monday evening. This week's pre- 
sentation will be a mystery eh- 
tltled "The Late Caller." adapted 
-by Stephen Birmingham '50 from 
a story by John Stillwell '49- 
Birmingham is also in charge of 
the direction of the broadcast. 

The cast will Include Mrs. Fran- 
ces Chaffee. Stanley Pierce '50. 
Larry Lewis '52, Frederick Loney 
'51. Mrs. Cathy Monger, and Mrs. 
Martla Stephenson. The broad- 
cast will be relayed to station 
WMNB In North Adams as were 
the other Dramatic Workshop 
presentations. 



Doxsee, 5 Otliern 
Face Grand Jury 

The climax to the fatal beating 
of Dartmouth .senior Raymond J. 
Cirotta came Wednesday when 
Thomas A. Doxsee. a Junior, ;;nd 
center of the Dartmouth lootb.dl 
team, was arraigned before a 
liiand Jury in Hanover on a 
charge of first degree man.slaugh- 
ter. Doxsee, along with four otlsc-r 
juniors and a sophomnre beii^g 
held as material wline.-»es, wa^ 
suspended from college the same 
day. 

Speculation'' over the cause of 
the events leading up to the fight 
in Cirotta's room has produced 
different versions of the story, 
but all accounts do present cer- 
tain facts. 

Cirotta Not Well Liked 

According to an official Dart- 
mouth release, which quotes un- 
dergraduates, Cirotta was consid- 
ered a "shifty guy" to whom num- 
erous instances of dishonesty 
were attributed. It suggests that 
another reason may have been his 
habit of "bo.ssing" meetings in 
Education 4, a course in which 
all of the principles were enrolled, 
or his leftist political beliefs. One 
man quoted said, "If it had to be 
See CIROTTA, Page 4 

Old Documents 
Displayed Here 



Exhibit Includes Letter 
From Thomas Jefferson 



A number of historical docu- 
ments from the collection of Wil- 
liam B. Browne of North Adams 
will be on display in the Williams 
College Library through April 2. 
Included In this Interesting exhi- 
bit is a letter written by Thomas 
Jefferson in 1801 acknowledging 
the great cheese weighing over 
1200 pounds presented him by a 
citizen of Cheshire Mass. 

Also on display is a manuscript 
deed written by William Cullen 
Bryant in 1817 while practicing 
law in Great Barrington and oth- 
er deeds either signed or witnes- 
sed by such early settlers as Oli- 
ver Wendell, ancestor of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes; James Otis of 
Revolutionary War fame; Sam- 
uel Hopkins, prominent theolo- 
gian and great-uncle of Mark 
Hopkins: Ellsha Chapln; Colonel 
Benjamin Simonds; and Thomas ' 
Allen, the "fighting parson" of 
Plttsfield. Another group of deeds , 
from Mr. Browne's collection are 
signed by various Stockbrldge In- 
dians, including Chief Youkoti, 
In whose honor Lenox Ma-ss. was 
originally named Youkontown. 



Winter thrills returned to Wil- 
liamstown Wednesday evening as 
John Jay's new movie "Skis over 
Europe" flashed before a crowd of 
over six hundred snow enthusiasts 
in Chapin Hall. 

Excellent color photography, 
Rood musical background, and a 
humorous running commentary 
presented in person by Jay com- 
bined to make the movie live up to 
President J. P. Baxter Ill's ad- 
vance notice. In a short intro- 
(Jjiction, Baxter called them "ab- 
solutely first rate," 

Jay showed two reels, one which 
he presented as a "sample of what 
went on in the winter Olympics 
of 1948," and the other which 
featured skiing in the Swiss and 
Italian Alps. 

Variety of Shots 
While concerned m^ly with 
skiing in the winter games, the 
movies included shots of many o- 
ther Olympic events. The parade 
which opened the games was pic- 
tured in ail its pomp and color. 
Beautiful Barbara Anne Scott of 
Canada was shown displaying the 
style that won the womens skat- 
ing crown. 

One difficulty involved in tak- 
ing the pictures that Jay men- 
tioned was the physical limita- 
tion of trying to film six or se- 
ven events all of which were tak- 
ing place at the same time. In 
spite of this, he managed to in- 
clude shots of hockey, bobsledd- 
ing, ,skating, and most of the ma- 
jor ski L:vei)ts. 

Praising American skiers through 
out the picture, he declared that 
"U. S. .skiing came of age" during 
See JA'iT, Page 4 i 



Ad'lphicUnionMembers 
Debate British Students 




Gjorge W. PafHson and Oeniil Freefli, tiie two Cambridge students 
who will debote witli members of the Adelphic Union Monday on whether 
or not Marsholl Plan aid should be discontinued. 



Michigan Undergrads Rale 
Profs. On Teaching Ability 

Dr. Llo.vd S. Woodbiirne, dean of the University of Michigan's 
College of Literature. Science, and The Arts, has announced the 
results of the grading by the college's 11.000 student's of its 410 
faculty members. Dean 'Woodbuine .said that the students eval- 
uation was quite similar with that of the department heads, and 

that steps had already been laken^ _ 

to remove or reassign the five 



members who rated as "very poor. " 
The students appraLsed their 
instructors on ten points, inclu- 
ding the difficulty of the cour.se, 
presentation of subject matter, 
; ;prpachabilitv. ability to arouse 
interest and stimulate thought, 
and "considering everything — 
general teaching effectiveness. " 
A similar survey was made earlier 



Want Dough? 
Here^s How! 



Winfield Plans 
Chinese Aid 



by Clark Kent 

Tony Tocio. of Lexington Mass.. 
should get the vote in the senior 
cla.ss poll as the Man Who Has 
Done Williams For Most. Tony 
has been on the receiving end of 
a steady flow of capitalist dollars, 
sent in during the past week by 
adicts of the Pyramid Club craze 
currently raging on campus. 

The Pyramid Club is a modern 
and super-complicated version of 
the old-time chain letter. The 
major difference is that under 
the new setup, the victim gets a 
chance to party up a little while 
he kisses his dollar good bye. If 
he is luckey, there may be a few 
brews on hand to ease the strain 
of parting. 

Boston to Billvtlle 

The pyramid fad now making 
the rounds was brought to this 
corner of the Berkshires from 
Boston by an enterprising young 
lad named George C. Thomason 
'49, a Deke. George will go down 
in history as one of the unsung 
heroes of college finance. 

The only trouble seems to lie 
in the fact that Williams, as 
usual, got on the band wagon just 
a little behind everyone else. To i 
make the pyramid pay, it is es- 
sential that It moves out of a town 
before it burns itself out. But 
Plttsfield has already had it, and 
North Adams will be financially I 
prostrate by the time this goes to 
press. 

Wa)nt to Party? 

So, if you need a few brews, or 
If you want to spend next winter 
in Miami, drop around to the 
Deke house after dinner, where 
tonight's Pyramid Parties are be- 
ing given by Kev Delaney and 
Duke Curtis. 

It should be noted, however, 
that all pyramid winnings are 
subject to a state lottery tax and 
surtax as of last Wednesday. 



Four Poi'iit I'rofiraiii 
Would Kui»^i; Slaiidards 



"There are two great struggles 
in the world today, the political 
and the cultural; that is, the 
struggle to harness the industrial 
revolution to raise the world's 
living standard. Both of them arc 
raging in China today." Gerald 
Winfield told a small audience at 
,1 lecture sponsored by the Inter- 
national Relations Club Thursday 
in Jesup. 

Speaking on the latter of these 
struggles, he stated that the fun- 
damental cause of Chinese pover- 
ty is that there are too many peo- 
ple on too little land using too 
primitive productive methods. On- 
ly through intensive pre-sclentiflc 
farming has tills population been 
able to so much as exist. 

The Chinese living standard is 
unbelievably yow. In 1948. Ameri- 
cans had a per-capita income of 
around $1200. In China, in com- 
parable terms, the average per- 
capita income was about $35. 
Can Be Chansed 
Winfield outlined a 

four point plan which, he said, 
could greatly increase this stand- 
ard. It would, first of all. be possi- 
ble, through the application of 
the most modern agricultural 
techniques, to double the produc- 
tivity of Chine-se land within fif- 
ty years. Secondly, about 25'l. more 
land can be put under cultivation. 

He further pointed out that if 
half the farm population could be 
shifted to other forms of produc- 
tion, the total output for the 
economy could be raised over 
300?. 

Reproductive Control 

Finally, by extensive birth con- 
See IBC, Page 4 



in the year at Rutgers and Brook- 
lyn College, but it was not used as 
an instrument of top-level policy 
as was tlie Michigan poll. 
Faculty Approved 

Dr. Woodburno stated that the 
dP'. !"e hpH hoen approved by the 
faculty, and that it had already 
proven so helpful that it would 
be continued for at least five 
years, and probably, would be 
kept as a permanent policy. 

"It is hard to determine what 
the validity of this instrument 
is," Dr. Woodburnc .said, "but be- 
cause it is difficult is no reason 
why we should not try lo raise it 
to its maximum usefulness. If 
the student is tire object of all 
this teaching, then he should 
have something lo say about it. " 



lliree Leclures 
Held By Bureau 



Talks Cover Bunking 
(ieology .'\cfoiiiitiiig 



Lectures on geology, banking, 
and accounting will be conducted 
by the Placement Bureau this 
week. After Spring vacation, five 
more are planned on the topics 
publishing, radio broadcasting, in- 
.surance, advertising, and medi- 
cine. 

Monday, Mes.sers Haltman. Mc- 
Kenna, and Smythe of the Cleve- 
land Graphite Bronze Co. will 
hold a group meeting at 4:30 in 
the Geology Lab lecture room for 
men of any cla.ss interested in 
the company and its opportunities 
Color slides and a short movie 
"Bearing by Graphite, " will be 
shown. The company offers open- 
ings in key departments of auto- 
mobile, diesal, and aviation bear- 
inft manufacturing, at $275 a 
month. 

Accounting; Lecture 

Also on monday, David B. Ma- 
thlas '26 of the auditing depart- 
ment of the Bankers Trust Com- 
pany in New York will discuss 
the many aspects of the field of 
accounting. Mr. Mathias will 
.speak at the Zete House at 7:30. 

MacHenry Schaefer, Second 
Vice President of the Northern 
Trust Company of Chicago will 
talk of Commercial Banking Wed- 
nesday. His bank offers a train- 
ing course of six to twelve months 
as a securities analyst, credit man. 
or operations trainee. 



Marshall Plan 
European Aid 
lo Be Argued 

Jeiihcli, .MrCoiiiicIl Join 
Cainl)ri(lg«- \eleraiis 
III l)is<'us-!?i(iii iMoiKiav 



ADELPHIC 

Cambridge University students 
George W. Patti.son and Denzil K. 
Freetli will join Cliarles Jensch 
'50 and Jack McConnell '50 in a 
debate on the subject "Resolved 
that Marshall Plan aid should 
cease, " in the annual Adelphic 
Union English student debate in 
Jesup Monday ai 8 p.m. 

The two English students are 
currently appearing in a series 
ot debates in colleges throughout 
the country which is sponsored 
by the Institute of International 
Education. Each year, students at 
either Oxford or Cambridge de- 
bate at Williams under the plan. 
Long War Records 
Both Britishers are officers of 
the Cambridge Union Society, and 
both have long records of war 
service Pattison. who will sup- 
port the affirmative side of the 
resolution, served for .seven years 
with the London Yeomanry and 
Royal Dragoon Guards, and saw 
service in the Middle East and 
the Central Mediterranean fronts. 
Freeth, who will argue the neg- 
ative .side, served for three ysaf?" 
! in the Royal Air Force, and was 
i trained as a pilot at the British 
i Training School at Clewiston. Fla. 
He received lus commission and 
wings in April, 1946. 

I Cambridge 

I Pattison was educated at Dean 
Close School. Cheltenham, and at 
St. John's College. Cambridge, 
where he received B.A. lionors i'l 
history. Now back at Cambridge 
after his war lime experience, he 
has been reading anthropology. 

After attending Sherbourne 
.school for four years. Mr. Preeth 
went to Trinity Hall. Cambridge 
until 194;! Since returning to 
Cambridge in 1947. he has been 
busy reading French. German, 
and acting as registrar for the 
University Conservative A.ssocia- 
tion. 

Debate Kepetoire 

At other collpges on Iheir lour, 
these students have debated sucli 
varied topics as "Socialism is a 
step on the road lo Communism, " 
"An immediate preventive war is 
sometimes sane policy," and "Eco- 
See ENGLISHMEN, Page 4 



Frosh Choose 
Class Council 



Ki'l)re.sen talipes Nanutl 
By Ti'ii Social Units 



Following a class meeting last 

Thursday evening, the freshmen 

delegations in the fraternities and 

the Garfield Club elected 

representatives to the freshman 

\ class council, which is a perma- 

! nent body designed to assi.st the 

class officers in detetminlng and 

j carrying out their activities. 

To date, ten of the .social units 
have reported their representa- 
tives: Ze'ta Psi, John Hyde; Gar- 
field Club, Tod Tillinghast and 
Pete Mezey; Sigma Phi, Pete Pi- 
card; Beta Theta Pi. John Mc- 
Math; Phi Gamma Delta. Walter 
Palmer; Psi Upsilon, Steve Grlbi; 
Delta Upsilon, Bill Widing; phl 
Delta Theta, Jerry Olsen; Chi Psi, 
John Montgomery; Kappa Alpha. 
Alec Porter; and Phi Sigma Kap- 
pa, Kent Carson. 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MARCH. 2(5,, 19^9 



f tr^ mmy^^ ^^xr^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Mossochusetts 



"Entered as second-class motter November 27, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Soturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) Editor 

Herbert D. Mohririg '50 Monoging Editors 

Norman S. Wood 50 . " " 

Philip S, Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) News Editor 

Lcnsinq G. Scofield '50 c„„.i, cAitnr^ 

.., ,, ^n c-» 'irr\ bports cditors 

Walter P. Stern 50 *^ 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associote 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Boker, S. Bloschke. K. F, X. Delany, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hastings. 

1952- R, Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. 
Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 o • kn 

rj J I fi iL 'cn Busmess Manager 

Edward L. Stockhouse 50 ^ 

Horry Frozier, Ml '51 Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Gorfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 r:".v..:-ryT~~"-.rrrr/r::rr:.:.:r. Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 ' Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Gonyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Mom, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Notch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E, Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



Volume XLIII 



MARCH 26, 1949 



Number 7 



Gripe Lists 



The number of times we have heard students claim that they 
have a list of gripes about this college that is a mile long is just 
about innumerable. Now here is the opportunity for all you dis- 
gruntled souls to air your gripes and to have their validity inves- 
tigated by the RECORD. If we find that they are legitimate and 
that something ought to be done about them, you can count on our 
doing some behind-the-scenes work to remedy the situation or on 
seeing an editorial about it shortly — that is, if you let us know 
about it. 

Drop a note to the editor, stating some of your pet peeves, 
and it will be a big help in letting us make this your newspaper. 
We don't pretend to be your Father Confessor or a Mr. Anthony, 
but we do want to investigate your complaints and suggestions, and 
also to try to clear up the many misconceptions tha( result from 
the flood of rumors that perpetually flows around the campus. 

These gripe lists will not be printed as Letters to the Editor, 
so they need noe even be signed. They are only for our own enlighten- 
ment as to what the many situations are that irk the average 
Williams student. So dash off your gripe list and send it to us, or else 
you won't have a gripe coming when nothing is ever done to fix 
up the situation. 



Keep Off The Grass 

"Keep ofl the Grass" may seem to be an odd plea to be found 
in the editorial column, but it certainly is appropriate at this time 
of year. With the Spring thaw finally here, most of what is gener- 
^ly known around campus to be gra.ss looks more like a mu;Idy 
old barnyard after a troop of cows have marched through It, followed 
up by a couple of traders. 

Parking on the grass, particularly in the Berkshire quad saves 
a lot of trouble, as does walking across either quad, but it does 
irrepairable damage when the ground is soft. The paths across 
the Lab campus and on the way to the library are in the process 
of being widened by two feet on either side, because the center of 
the path is so soggy. 

The sidewalk plows scraped up enough grass during the winter, 
so lets .see if we can't prevent a lot of the annual Spring damage. 
The lawns can be ripped up in one day, but its almost impo.ssible 
to grow them back within a couple years, if ever. 



Letter Policy 

The recent receipt of letters signed either with a pen name 
or anonymously prompts a restatement of the RECORD'S policy 
on Letters to the Editor. We will not print anonymous letters, but 
will, by request, withhold the writer's name if sufficient reason is 
given. We do not print every letter we receive and also reserve 
the right to spare our more discriminating readers as much anguish 
as possible by correcting grammar and spelling. When parts of an 
excessively long letter must be cut out, we will make every attempt 
to gain the writer's permission beforehand. There will be occasions, 
however, when time will not permit this. 



Dormitory Rules 

The UC Discipline Committee's recent reminder of the possible 
punishment lone year's .suspension) for violation of the college rules 
about having women in dormitories ha.s caused a furor among the 
many students who break those rules for wholly innocent purposes, 
and immediately calls into question the validity of the rules. 

At present the regulations state that no man may entertain a 
woman guest in a dormitory before 1 p.m. or after 6;30 p.m. This 
seems quite ridiculous and tends to put a damper on the all too tew 
Intra-dorm friendships. The dormitory is the most logical place 
where friends from diverse houses, living together, can get together 
and give a small party which traverses the barrier of fraternity 
membership. Such get-togethers are particularly evident in dorms 
on weekends in the period of early evening before the dances start 
and also on Sunday morning before the 1 p.m. dinner 

To clamp down on the.se impromptu affairs would be to clamp 
down on this very important function of the dormitory as a place 
where inter-fraternity friendships can be made and maintained. To 
bring the dormitory regulations into closer coincidence with some- 
thing that can be sensibly enforced, we would suggest a change In 
those regulations to permit the entertainment of women guests in the 
dorms between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. 

Even with this change, in enforcing the rule the Discipline 
Committee ought to remember the spirit of the law and not its 
letter. It's spirit, it seems, is its purpose — the prevention of im- 
morality in dormitory rooms. Action should be taken to prevent this, 
certainly. But to adhere to the letter of this regulation, that Is. 
to have a policy that every man reported must be punished, even 
though there is undoubtably evidence that his activities while In the 
room were Innocent, seems enexcusable. It would rack unnecessary 
hardship not only on those who were reported but also on those 
who, for fear at punishment, hatjto refrain from Informal dorm- 
itory parties, 

■>■ I' 



Hitting The Flicks J 



ROGUES REGIMENT (Tonight) Take the French Foreign Legion, 
add a sultry night club entertainer, assorted Nazis and recalcitrants, 
plus a U.S. Intelligence officer, and splash carelessly against the 
background of Saigon, and you won't be far off on this one. Dick 
Powell stumbles through the subletles of international espionage, 
in and out of the arms of Marta Toren, and somehow manages to 
unscramble the whole mess in time for the parting kiss. It seems 
that one of Hitler's boys is on the post-war loose and is raising hob 
with the Foreign Legion. Naturally, this culprit must be brought 
to Justice, which task belongs to Mr. Powell, aided, of course, by 
beauteous Miss TToren his contact with the desperadoes. If spies et al 
were really as simple as this picture makes out, then we might as 
well fire officers like Powell. 

A SONG IS BORN (Sun-Mon) Here is a picture full of music, and 
musicians, and yet Hollywood somehow managed to overlook the 
feature attraction's best routine. Not one scat song does Danny Kaye 
get to sing, but must content himself with occasional mugging and 
situation comedy. The situation is pretty comic, and Virginia Mayo's 
acting ability doesn't get In the way, which Is a Godsend, for the 
whole thing could go up in a sigh if somebody had managed a 
straight line. Among the musicians, who get all to little chance 
to show their stuff, Louis Armstrong stands out. Benny Goodman in 
the part of a professor, provides a laugh along with some pretty 
fair clarinet. Altogether worthwhile. 

TO LIVE IN PEACE iTues-Wed) The Italians seem to be the only 
movie-makers left who can put over a serious theme without the 
usual Hollywood histrionics. This is concerned with the brotherhood 
of man, but it is done without any excess emotionality, and like 
SHOESHINE leaves the moral to you. The story finds a farmer 
leading a normally bucolic life, which is rudely interrupted when 
he shelters two American soldiers from the Nazis. Tragedy ensues, 
but in the end the farmer is left to till his fllds again, having 
learned something. Maybe audiences here will learn too, but at 
least this is a picture which will be hard to forget. 
THE INFX3RMER (Thurs) By special request of the English Depart- 
ment this venerable drama returns to Williamstown. For those among 
you who haven't read the script, this is the story of a rather be- 
wildered product of the Irish Revolution who turns Informer with- 
out realizing the horrible import of the dirty deed. The photography 
is pretty fair, although many improvements in technique have been 
made since 1935, Victor McLaglen is good as the character in ques- 
tion, and some of the extras are well worth seeing in action. If 
you don't have to study it, this isn't too bad a picture. 
HILLS OF HOME (Fri-Sat) The picture that asks the question, is 
Lassie a he or a she'? The answer is never given, but you will learn 
all about the trials of a sheepdog who is afraid of water. This, it 
seems, is a terrible handicap, and as you watch a group of people 
try to untangle this knotty problem, you may wonder why Edmund 
Gwenn, who has done some good work in the past in pictures like 
THE MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET, ended up in this series. Tom 
Drake and Janet Leigh provide the young blood, and the techni- 
colored scene is set in Scotland, a popular spot for conglomerate 
accents and tweedy heroes. 



Letters To The Editor 



Hide and Seek 



To the Editor of the Williams RECORD: 

The recent musical production at the Adams Memorial Theatre 
took over 7400 student man hours to produce. This figure is exclusive 
of paid staff such as director, assistant director, technical super- 
visor and wardrobe mistress and does not include the time of Steve 
Sondheim in rehearsals or in writing the music of his excellent 
score. 

In contrast to this figure, there were only 493 students that 
attended the four performances. It seems a shame that so much 
time, money and effort had to be expended for the enjoymen of 
so few students. 

Since the Williams student does not attend concerts, lectures, 
dramatic plays, musical productions or classes, will some helpful 
soul please inform this uninitiated newcomer just where they can be 
found? 

Irwin Shainman 
March 23, 1949 Visiting Assistant Professor of Music 



Plug 



To the Editor of the Williams RECORD: 

In your article, "Bonanza Sets New Record." in the March 15 
Record, you state that the plane carried 288 gallons of 80 Octane 
gasoline. I thought your readers might be interested to know that 
although the planes tank capacity was only 288 gallons. Shell 
Aviation Engineers working with Captain Odom managed to squeeze 
300 gallons of Shell 80 Octane aviation gasoline into the tanks by 
packing the fuel load with dry ice, thus saving 12 gallons of gasoline. 
It is interesting to note that upon completion of the trip, the tanks 
had only 13 gallons left. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Daniel A. PettenglU '48 

March 16 Shell Oil Co. 



WMS Schedule 





Week of March 28 


9:00 


News 




Monday thru Friday 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


5:00-6 


:15 Afternoon Roundup 


9:30 


Show Time 




Monday 


10:00 


Gilbert and Sullivan 


8:00 


Dramatic Workshop 


10:30 


650 Club 


8:30 


Classical Music 




Tliursday 


9:00 


News 


7:30 


Faculty Talks 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


7:45 


Concert Hall 


9:30 


Songs by Schauffler 


9:00 


News 


9:45 


Music 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


10:00 


Plumb's Bop Shop 


9:30 


Piano by McCombe 


10:30 


Campus Hit Parade 


9:45 


U.S. Dept. of Education 




Tuesday 


10:00 


Furguson Jazz Show 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


10:30 


Coffee Time at Mike's 


9:00 


News-Sports 




Friday 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


9:30 


Kellogg & Stelnbrenner 


9:00 


News 


9:45 


Evans and Park 


9:16 


Band of the Nite 


10:00 


Great Expectations 


9:30 


Old Chuck Wagon 


10:30 


Vem'ey 'Varieties 


10:00 


Mostly for Dreaming 




Wednesday 




Saturday 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


6:16-6:15 Williams Inn Bdcst. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

Wlitn you oaq fet the out- 
standlng newii of th« day every 
evenlnf throufb the full leaaed 
wire Alwoclated Pres$ servlbe In 

North Adomi, Man. 
On sola et 5 p.m. on oil 
WilKomttown Ncwtttondi 




....^CJ^rftw «'«»■> 



UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CO.. 

Ikifv.ii.l Su t. u.nl.t.iJor M<iM. ■ 



EMILY POST says - 



that it is a polite gesture to take a gift to 
to your hostess when visiting. 

WE SUGGEST Ronson table lighters, 

Kensingtonware, Cyma bureau clocks, 
'. or some of our beautiful demitasse cups 



Bastien^s 



PlaHnecl PuHtini 



± 



Miller, Lamb & Hunter 

Incorporated 

Weber Avenue 
NOHTH ADAMS, MASS. - 
Telephone 3553 



DO YOU READ 
THE ADS? 

What advertisements foi .J 

in this issue contain iff s 

suggested by the phro s 
below. 

1-Only 50c and 12 wrappt rs 
2-Planned Printing 
3-Serving us since 1891 
4-save coolie labor 
5-pretty waitresses and dirvy 

suits. 
6-Einily Post 
7Alexander Graham 
8-Your Van Heusen deolcr 

(answers on page 4) 



WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS 
FOR THE NEW 



1949 



*yc'ra 



CONVERTIBLES AND STATION WAGONS 
FOR EARLY SPRING DELIVERY 

HARRY SMITH, Incorporated 

North Adonis 
your FORD and MERCURY dealer 



An Amazing Offer by 

HOLIDAY 

Plpa MIxfvn 

The pipe (hiievtririniokerw.iit.-DANA die 
modern pipe, with brighclr poliihed iliin.^ 
jnum iliaok and g.niiin« l«.po,t^ beigr bn 




with ituide wrappers 
from 12 podcrt CUM of 
MOLID/ir PIPE miTDIE 




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Ortaf UmlUd to USA^bpIrM 



Qoing South? 




If you're going South for 
the vocation, don't leave 
before looking yourself over 
let us outfit you for any 
locality, any climate with 
the best in Men's clothes. 

Tropicals 
Gabardines 
Seersucker 
Palm Beach 



Also white suedes, 
shirts, formal wear. . 



sport 



nf 



SERVING WILLIAMS MEN 
FOR FIFTY-EIGHT YEARS 



BOWLITORIUM 

For on Afternoon or 

Evening of Recreation 

Route 7 Phone 800-V 

Interfroternity League 
Standings 



DKE 

Garfield 

OU 

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AD 

Psi U 



17 
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4 
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-11 
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-15 



RELIABLE SERVICE 

Join our Hit of Rofular 
Williams Cuttomon at . . 

KRONICK'S 

E880 Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 



TERM PAPERS DUE? 

Be independent. Rent a 
typewriter and do it your- 
self when you wont. 



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SMITH CORONA' 

Soles and Service 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1949 



Varsity Tennis 
learn Strength 
lo Rival '48 



Lacrosse Captain 



^ 'JfkmV 



First Six Men Return 

ToFormStrongSquad; 

Trip To Practice* 

with the first six men Irom 
last year's outstanding team re- 
turning, the f rfime for a successful 
1949 tennis season Is strong, but 
whether the boys can string to- 
gether a pattern of victories will 
depend to a large extent on a 
steady sun drying up the April 
showers. 

Coach Clarence Chaffee stated 
that while Williams may not com- 
pare in strength to such tennis 
powers as Yale, North Carolina, 
and Princeton, we are definitely 
in the same cl&ss with schools like 
Harvard, Dartmouth, and Army 
and should be leading contenders 
for the Little Three title. 

Rain Complicates 

Although the raclcetmen ought 
lo be pretty good shape after 
their Southern swing during Sp- 
ring vacation, the Sage Hall 
courts will not be usable until the 
last week of April. Thus the team 
will have two weeks, broken only 
by a meet with Princeton during 
which outdoor practice will be Im- 
possible, and they may have trou- 
ble keeping their form. 

Stu Robinson. Fied Scribner, 
and Captain Charlie Schaaf spear 
head the group returning from 
last year's squad, which lost only 
to Princeton. Robinson holds the 
college singles crown while Schaaf 
and Scribner are New Kngland 
doubles champs. Other players in 
the first seven are Dick Palmer, 
Pete Thurber, Joe Takamine, and 
Bud Treman. 




Auity Tolioferrb, 
who captains the 
lacroste.team. 



star midfielder, 
1949 Williams 



Sabrinas Strong In Baseball; 

Tracksters Have Titleholders 
Returning; Tennis Prospects Dim 



Some 52 candidates, including 11 lettermen, are going through 
daily three hour workouts in Amherst's Pratt Cage under the guid- 
ance of Coach Paul Eckley in preparation for the 1949 collegiate 
baseball season. 

Eckley is returning once again to the helm after a year's absence 
due to Illness. Stuffy Mclnnis, first baseman on the Philadelphia A's 
famous $100,000 infield took over for Eckley last season and turned out 



a club which won 10 and lost five. 
He is now head coach at Harvard 
and will play host to the Lord 
Jeffs on May 26. 

Infield Returns 
The one spot on the ball club 
which Eckley will not have to 



Taliaferro To 
Lead Stickmen 



The Captain of the 1949 la- 
crosse team is Austin B. Talia- 
ferro '49, veteran of many seasons 
of lacrosse. "Tolly" is 22 years 
old and a member of Delta Up- 
silon. A native of Baltimore, he 
attended St. Paul's School in that 
city where he played one year 
of varsity football and one year 
of varsity lacrosse. On the la- 
crosse team he was the replace- 
ment for the famous Billy Hooper, 
star attackman. He left St. Paul's 
for the Navy in 1945. 

"Tolly" has played two years of 
varsity lacrosse for Williams. He 
left his favored attack position 
last season to star at center. Of 
this year's team he says "We have 
more experience and will work to- 
gether as a team. We should do 
better than last season. On our 
tough spring trip everyone will 
leam a lot of lacrosse." 



Dresser Gains 
Squash Finals 

Wright, Allen To Meet 
In Semi-final Match 



worry about, unless the unfore- 
seen occurs, is the infield. All 
four regulars of a year ago are 
back. These include first base- 
man Ez Bowen, second baseman 
Dave McNelsh, shortstop and cap- 
tain Ivar Rosendale and third 
baseman Bill Genovese. Rosendale 
hit over .400 last year until the 
final game, when he slipped a few 
points below, batted in 16 runs 
and was a standout defensively. 
Pitching could be classified 
from fair to good. Lefty Char 
ley Murphy is ready for his fin 
al year, but the Sabrinas will be 
without Clarke Rainey, the stocky 
righthander, who was the work 
horse of the staff last year. He 
has since graduated. To All this 



Guides Cindermenl^D SwimmerS 

Score Victory 
In Intramurals 




Bill Barney, veteran four-event 
man, captain of the Eph spring track 
team. 



Seeded players completely do 
mlnate the scene as the 1949 col 
lege squash tourney moves into ' gap Eckley has a number of hur- 
the final rounds this week. In the lers, who have seen some exper- 
upper bracket Jerry Dresser, num- lence but need to improve further 
ber two contender for the crown to join the front ranks. These 

John Bergin, Don Dun- 
Crabtree, Dick Le- 
Thomas in three games. Dresser land. Dean Woodman and Dave 



won his way into the finals by dis- include 
posing of third seeded Randy : bar, George 



had previously beaten George Mu- 
ller in a quarterfinal match. 

Dresser's opposition in the 
championship battle will be fur- 
nished by either Rich Allen, top 
seeded entrant, or defending 
champion George Wright. Wright 
and Allen both reached the semi- 
finals in quick three game vic- 
tories over Frank Donnelly and 
Rollo Palmedo. 



GARAGE SPACE 
Two nice garages with 
lights for rent. 

85 E. Main Street, 
Williamstown Phone 488-M 



Barnev Heads 
Track Team 




HE HAS BUILT A BRAND NEW CITY 

The "telephone man" is mighty busy these days! 

Since the war, among many other things, he has built 
or enlarged 2,800 buildings . . . scores of them large 
enough to fit into the skyline of a modern metropolis. 
■ These buildings are more than brick, mortar and tele- 
phone equipment They are jobs for thousands of men 
and women . . .. more and better telephone service for 
millions of people . . . more business for the towns and 
cities in which they are located. 

But most important of all, they are an indication of 
the Bell System's earnest efforts to keep up with the 
nation's ever growing needs for communications service. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



Gold. On the amount that the 
latter group develops this year will 
depend to a large extent the suc- 
cess of the season. 

Catching, Outfield 

Bill Woehrlin and Jake Jordan, 
an outfielder a year ago, are the 
most likely prospects to take o- 
ver the catching left vacant by the 
graduation of Jack Porte while 
Eckley will have to remake the 
outfield almost completely. Soph- 
omores John "Moo.se" McGrath 
and Archie Tull have shown the 
most so far and may be teamed 
with either Jordan, Ned Barry or 
Don Butler in the outer garden. 
The latter is the longest ball hit- 
ter on tlie club, but has been side- 
lined for most of the last two 
seasons with a bad arm. If the 
arm responds to current treat- 
ment, his presence in the lineup 
would add much needed punch to 
the attack. 

The season opens April 20 and 
gets off to a fast start with six 
games in eleven days. In addition 
to the Little Three home-and- 
home .series. Boston College. Dart- 
mouth. Colgate and Harvard are 
on the schedule. 

Track Champs 

Al Lumley's outdoor track squad 
consists of mcst of last year's var- 
sity Little Three Champions and 
the best of the frosh Little Three 
title-holders. Strength lies in the 
dashes, distance runs and jumps 
while the weights, except for the 
35 pound throw, are very weak. 

Bill Neill. who did 9.9 for the 
100 as a freshman last year and 
Herb middleton. indoor 40 yard re- 
cord holdfer, give Lumley two 
formidiable sprinters while Bill 
Scott, Ed Cobb, Kim Valentine 
and Don Bozarth are all veterans 
at a half-mile and up. 

Bob Hatch, once more vaulting 
over 12 feet, after recovery from 
a foot Injury, and Hank Williams 
5'H" high jumper are standouts 
in the field events as is hammer 
thrower Rog Neuhoff. However a 
broad jumper, a shotputer and a 
quartermiler must be developed to 
round out the squad. 

Tennis Weak 

Last year's tennis squad had a 
poor.sea'son and prospects for a 
better one are dim this year. The 
top three players of a year ago. 
Dave Rees, Chuck Keevil and Bill 
Graham have all been graduated. 
Coach Frank Gillespie has two hr 
three sophomores, who will be of 
help but the required depth Is 
still lacking. 

See SABRINAS, Page 4 



Bill Barney has competed in 
spring track since his freshman 
year, participating during that 
time in the 100, 220, 440 yard 
dashes and the broad jump. For 
two consecutive years he has cop- 
ped the Lehman Decathlon, and 
last summer he finished third in 
the National Pentathlon Champ- 
ionships. In addition. Barney has 
been active in varsity indoor track 
for the past three seasons, serving 
as co-captain this year. 

Hailing from Cleveland. Ohio, 
he is a member of Alpha Delta 
Phi ex-president of the Students 
Activities Council and the News 
Bureau, ex-editor of the hand- 
book and the Record sports de- 
partment, and formerly a member 
of the UC. 



Al|>ha Dcit 'IVani Wins 
By Narrow Margin; 
l*si L'pbilon Second 



... 


Volleyball 


Stand 


in^s 


League I 




Phi Delt 




3 - 1 


Betas 




3 - 1 


Delta Psi 




3 - 1 


Theta Dell 




3 - 1 


Chi Psi 




2 - 2 


Phi Gam 




1 - 3 


Alpha Delt 




- 3 


Phi Sig 




- 3 


League II 




Dekes 




5 - 


Delta Upsilon 




4 - 1 


Kappa Alpha 




4 - 1 


Sigma Phi 




3 - 2 


Psi Upsilon 




2 - 3 


Delta Phi 




1 - 4 


Garfield Club 




1 - 4 


Zeta Psi 




- 5 









iWIMMING MEET TOTAL SCORES 

Total point scores: AD-19: Psi 
U-n; KA-14: DKE-13)i: Phi Gan; 
-11; Theta Delt-10; Phi Delt 
Saints-5; Betes-3: Zetes-2:/Chi 
Psi-2. 



Placing first in two of eight 
events, including Ihe very impor- 
tant medley relay, the Alpha Del- 
ta Phi swimming team edged a 
strong Psi Upsilon squad by two 
points to take top honors in the 
intramural swimming meet finals, 
held Thursday afternoon in Lasell 
Pool. When the final race was 
over and the spray had cleared, 
the Alpha Delts had amassed a 
total of nineteen points, Psi U 
had garnerei seventeen, and four 
other teams had managed to col- 
lect ten or more. 

The AD swimmers got off to a 
good start, winning the medley 
relay, but had to be satisfied with 
second place in the 200 yard free- 
style, which was won by Don Wy- 
man of DKE. 

50 Close 

In the 50, the closest race of 
the afternoon, Charlie Arnold 
managed to win for Kappa Alpha, 
while his four opponents all tied 
for second place. An upset was 
scored in the dive, when Steve 
Whittier of the Saints, who had 
only placed fifth in the trials, 
won by, a very slight margin. 

John Warren, of Theta Delt, 
swam a fast ;58.0 in the 100 and 
the backstroke which followed 
went to Pete Ganyard of Psi U. 

AD Wins 

The Alpha Delts took their sec- 
ond first of the meet in the 100 
yard breaststroke as Sam Gentles 
beat out Porter of Phi Delt. This 
victory boosted their total score 
to nineteen points as compared to 
Psi Us seventeen, and when Psi 
U failed to place in the final re- 
lay which was won by Phi Gam, 
AD was assured of a victory. 
The summary : 

150 Medley Relay: won by Alpha 
Delt. Psi U, Phi Delt. KA time: " 
1:30.1; 200 Freestyle: won by Wy- 
man iDKEi. Fox 'AD). Jarrett 
(Zetei. Chase iPsi U' time: 2:22 
.6; 50 Freestyle: won by Arnold 
(KA), tie tor .second between Rus- 
sell I Phi Gam). Rockwood iPhi 
Gam I. Callahan iDKEi and Shay 
iD Phi) time: :25.6; Dive: won by 
Whittier i Saint). Wynn iBete). 
Kent iPsi Ui. Fay )KA); 100 
Freestyle: won by Warren (Theta 
Delt). Wyman (DKE). Pinkerton 
(Chi Psii. Hopfenbeck (KA) time: 
:58.0; 100 Backstroke: won by 
Ganyard (Psi U), Louis (ADi, 
Jordan 'DKE). Showers 'Phi 
Delt) time: 1:11.3; 100 Breast- 
stroke:/ won by Gentles (ADl. 
Porto/ 'Phi Delt). Pre.scott (Psi 
IJ/T Hatch 'Psi U). time: 1:16.4; 
00 Freestyle Relay: won by Phi 
Gam, tie for second between KA 
and Theta Delt, DKE time: 
1:45.9. 




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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1949 



Whiteman Gives Music 
Magazines To Library 

Paul Whiteman has contributed 
to the college library subscriptions 



RARE OPPORTUNITY 

STUDY . . . TRAVIt 

in SPAIN 

CaMllian Group-Andoludon Group 

Botquc-Catolan Group 

65 DAYS - - - $975.00 

DEPARTURES JUNE 29 to JULY 2 

Spomorod by; 

UNIVERSITY of MADRID 

For Information Writ* 

SPANISH STUDENT TOURS 

500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y. 



ANSWERS: 1- Holiday Pipe to- 
bacco. 2- Miller, Lamb & Hunter. 
3- House of Walsh. 4- D & D 
Office Service. 5- George Rudnick, 
Inc. 6- Bastiens. 1- Bell Tele- 
phone System. 8- Williams Co-op. 



Englishmen - • > 

nomio planning la not campatlble 
with political freedom." 

Jensch and McConnell won the 
right to represent the school In 
Adelphlc Union tryouts early this 
month. 

To honor the visiting debaters 
a tea will be held iSunday at the 
New Faculty House for all Adel- 
phlc Union members at 4-5:30 
p.m. ' 



Draft - - 



AFTER THE 
FLICKS 
IT'S THE r 



THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 




ENDS SATURDAY 

Dick Powell -:— Morto Toren 

ROGUE'S REGIMENT 

Feature ot 6:50 - 8:50 

SUNDAY - MONDAY 

Danny Kay — Virginia Mayo 

A SONG IS BORN 

Sunday Feature ot 2:00, 4:00, 

6:10, 8:40. 

Mondoy Feature at 6:30, 8:50 

TUESDAY 

Itolion Dialogue 

Englisli Titles 

TO LIVE IN PEACE 

Feature at 7:00, 9:00 
WEDNESbAY 

THE GREAT MR. HANDEL 

Feature at 6:50, 8:45 



creases In unemployment." 

Representative Carl Vinson of 
Qeorgia, chairman of the Armed 
Services Committee was asked 
what effect the "development 
would have on his announced in- 
tention to defer consideration of 
a universal military training bill 
so long as young men were sub- 
ject to compulsory service in the 
armed forces, as distinguished 
from the UMT plan of training 
them without actually Inducting 
them." 

"None at all," he said, "except 
to put it that much further off." 



Jay 



the ski Jumping. His dramatic 
presentation of the race in which 
Gretchen Fraser of America tri- 
umphed over the best women 
skiers in Europe proved to be 
partlcularly^effectlve to pointing 
out the success of American Ol- 
ympic skiing. 

Shots of skiing In the Swiss and 
Italian ski areas provided an au- 
dience, used to the wooded trails 
of New England, with vicarious 
thrills in long open slope skiing. 
One of thf most spectacular shots 
of the picture showed an Italian 
race down a straight two mile ski 
run. 



Sabrinas - - - 

Billy Smith, star of the squash 
team, should be the number one 
man this spring and seems ready 
to become one of the best tennis 
players in New England collegiate 
circles. John Martin is another 
promising sophomore. 



THE 

1 


4 


SANDWICHES 
BEER & WINE 
TELEVISION 




ACRES 


Open all winter 




Hoar Lecture On 

Disease Treatipient 

Professor Carl S. Hoar of the 
biology department delivered the 
Faculty lecture last Thursday af- 
ternoon in the chemistry lab. He 
chose as his subject "The Chang- 
ing Methods for the Prevention 
and Treatment of Disease." 

Professor Hoar pointed out the 
change in emphasis of the attack 
on disease. Today the stress is on 
conquering disease bacteria with 
chemicals, rather than relying on 
active or passive . methods of im- 
munization. 

He then outlined the use of var- 
ious antibiotics, including latest 
discoveries to catch the public eye, 
such as penicillin and sulpha 
drugs, in the treatment of cer- 
tain diseases. 

Prftfessor Burns of the Political 
Science department will give the 
last talk In the series, "Can Con- 
gress ^form Itself," next week. 



Cirotta 



From The Files 



the legislature are 
ran the glaring head- 



"Half 
crooks I ' 
line. 
A retraction in full was demand- 
ed of the editor. 

Next afternoo n th e headline 
read: "Half the legislature are 
not crooks!" 

Borrowed from U. of Wyoming 
BRANDING IRON 

Pilot to Control Tower: "Ceil- 
ing and visibility zero, my engine 
is missing, my wheels won't come 
down, and I'm out of gas — what 
should I do?" 

Control Tower to Pilot (after 
long pause) : "Repeat after me: 
'Our Father who art ' " 

Pilferred from Auburn PLAINS- 
MAN 



any Dartmouth man, I'm Just as 
glad that It was Cirotta." 

Charles F. Teseau," attorney 
for Doxsee gave the following ac- 
count of the sequence of events. 
He admitted that none of the 
men could remember the exact 
sequence of events, or exactly who 
had done what. 

Attackers Were Drinkinir 

The six men had been drinking 
at several parties before they 
went into Cirotta's room between 
10-10:30 p.m. Friday. "They en- 
tered his study with the Intention 
of messing up the furniture, found 
no (^e around, and proceeded to 
turn over some chairs and throw 
some books around the room. 

"Cirotta _^ came out of his bed- 
room dressed in shorts and wear- 
ing a green sweater with a small 
'D' some of the boys began to get 
sore at him because he was wear- 
ing a letter which he had not 
earned." 

(Cirotta was a star athlete at 
PeeksklU Academy, and he had 
played on the Dartmouth fresh- 
man football team, but after his 
return from the Army, he had not 
resumed his athletic career). 
Begins Fight 

"Doxsee struck Cirotta In the 
stomach," Tesreau said, "and a 
couple of guys tried to piill the 
sweater off trtm. He^ either fell 
or was pushed back through the 
doorway Into his bedroom where 
he struck his head on the comer 
of a desk. The six then left Ciro- 
tta's room." 

"About midnight,s Cirotta' 



IRC ■ • • 

trol measures, and a co-ordinattd 
public health program, It wouu 



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mg made to get Mr. Whiteman to , P"-"*'""" *°"»<» "ring about. 

lecture here In the late Spring In | _ 

connection with a student-facul- 
ty panel discussion on modern 
American music. 



room mate came back from the 
library and found Cirotta on his 
bed complaining that he couldn't 
sleep. His room mate called the 
head of the campus police, who 
had Cirotta removed to the col- 
lege infirmary. He died at about 
4 a.m. at the Mary Hitchcock 
Hospital during an emergency op- 
eration on his head." 



L G. BALFOUR C(). 

FRATIRNITY JIWELRY 

Bad9U Ring! Sitint 

, Jowolry OifH Faven 

Stationary Froflrams 

Club Pini 'Keys 

Madah Troplila* 

Write or Coll 

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Telephone Waterford 644 



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\ I Let D &I D do the typing . , 

D & H^FFICE SERVICE 

TEL. NORTH ADAMS 22 

Leave material to be typed at 85 Spring Street 

next to the AlUrnni House 



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Volume XLIII, Number 8 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE . 





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



Price 10 cents 



College .Announces 
Two INew Majors 



Professorship 
Established 
In Psychology 

Spanish Major Open 

To Class Of 1951, 

Psych To Juniors 

Majors In psychology and Span- 
ish will be added to the Williams 
curriculum, according to Presi- 
dent James P- Baxter, 3rd. The 
psychology major will be open to' 
present Juniors who bave^ the 
necessary prerequisites. Members 
of the Class o{ 1951 will be the 
first ones able to enroll In the 
new Spanish department. 

The creation of a professional 
chair specifically for psychology 
by an as yet anonymous donor 
enables Williams to bring Its cur- 
riculum abreast of those of Am- 
herst and Wesleyan, who have in- 
cluded psychology among their 
majors for some time. It Is hoped 
that this chair wiU be fUled by 
next year, so that It will be pos- 
sible for those members of the 
class of 1962 who have taken the 
necessary sequence courses to ap- 
ply for the major. 

New FiyeholotT Course 

To make this major possible, a 
new senior course, psychology 19- 
20, has been designed as the final 
sequence course. Dealing primar- 
ily with the historical aspects of 
psychology, it will include a de- 
tailed study of the major schools 
of thought. The 1-2 course. In 
volving the fundamental princi- 
ples of human behavior will con 
tinue without change as the first 
of the sequence courses. The sec- 
ond sequence course will be psy- 
chology 6-6, which was offered for 
the first time this year. Psychol- 
ogical measurements, statistics, 
and experiments form the basis 
of this requisite. 

Among the corollary courses are 
Economics 7-8, Political Science 
9-10, and Philosophy 1-2. 
Senior Spanish- Course 

In the fall of 1950 a 19-20 Span- 
ish course will be added to the 
Itmguage division to complete the 
requirements for those who elect 
to take the new Spanish major 
this spring. The sequence courses 
required prior to this senior 
course will be the present Spanish 
5-ft and 7-8. All of these requis- 
ites are literature courses. 

For corollaries, the prospective 
Spanish major can choose any 
two of the following: Spanish 6a- 
6a, 9-10. or 11-12. 



Athletic Awards 

To Be Given Today 

Williams' varsity and fresh- 
man teams of the winter season 
will be presented with athletic 
awards this aftemoon-at 4 p.m. 
in the Taconic Theater. Let- 
ters and class numerals will be 
given to 157 men at the Athle- 
tic Awards Presentation Pro- 
gram. 

Sponsored by the Purple Key 
Society, the program features 
moving pictures of the sports 
world and, as an added at- 
traction, a running comment- 
ary by Athletic Director John 
Jay on one of his noteworthy 
skiing fUms. Informality is 
stressed and free cigarettes 
will be provided for those at- 
tending. 



Undergraduate Opinion Poll BritisherS Score Hit 

Favors Maintaining Present 
Enrollment Level Indefinitely 



VC, Faculty 
Pick 29 JA's 



"Variety" Covers 
"All That Glitters" 



Lauds Bryant Direction, 
Cites Music, Lyrics 



"All That Qlltters," Stephen 
Sondheim's adaption of the 1924 
comedy "Beggar On Horseback" 
by Oeorge Kaufman and Marc 
Connelly, was not reviewed solely 
by the Record after Its produc- 
tion by Cap and Bells ten days 
ago. "Variety", mouthpiece of 
the theatre world, also ran an 
item on the show in their last 
issue. The story had this, in psrt, 
to say: 

"The music and lyrics have been 
composed as an integral part of 
the play, and Stephen Sondheim 
displays great potential ability 
M a lyricist-composer. . . The 
show's outstanding number, how- 
ever is "The Bordelalse.' 
Direction Praised 

"Oreat credit goes to the dir- 
ector David C. Bryant and his 
assistant James Van Wart for 
obtaining the results they do. Tal- 
See 'VARnrry, Page 6 



Select Sophomores 
For Merit, Ability 

Twenty-nine Junior advisors 
halve been selected from the pre- 
sent sophomore class by a Joint 
UC-Paculty Committee. These 
men and nine alternates were 
chosen from 96 applicants for the 
positions, and will begin super- 
vision of next year's freshman 
class in the fall. 

Those chosen, all sophomores, 
are: James P. Brown, William H. 
Campbell, ni; Edward R. Childs, 
Jr.; Allen O. Clarke, Jr.; Dewey 
P. Fagerburg, Jr.; Bronson Fargo, 
Brendan J. Farrlngton, John M. 
Fraser, John B. French, Robert 
J. Oeneisse, Donald P. Qregg. 
Donald C. Gregory, Oeorge M. 
Hopfenbeck, Jr.; H. Robert Hunt, 
David W- Jackson, Leonard Jac- 
ob, Jr.; Robert H. Jeffrey, II; 
Richard C. ijppencott, James B. 
Lynch, Wallace V. Mann, Jr.; 
Clyde E. Maxwell, m; Arnold J. 
Mldwood, Jr. Ernest' J. Mlerze- 
Jewskl, Crosby B. Perry, Bradford 
N. Pusey, Charles E. Pusey, Jr.; 
Oeorge W. Selly, Charles L. 
Smythe, Jr.; Walter E. Zlegenhals. 
See JA, Page 6 



Dean Explains 
Cutting Rules 

'Double Cuts' Applicable 
Only Twice Next Year 

Dean Brooks corrected certain 
misunderstandings at the UC 
meeting Monday night about cut- 
ting rules recently passed by the 
faculty, and emphasized that 
"double-cuts", i.e. two cuts re- 
corded for one cut taken, will ap- 
ply on only two occasions next 
year. 

These two times will be on the 
Friday and Monday of houseparty 
weekends, next fall and spring. 
The Satiu'days of those two week- 
ends were recently voted as col- 
lege holidays. Regarding other ya- 
cations, it is necessary for stud- 
ents to attend all classes on only 
the day preceding and following 
a recess. This is a change from 
the fbrmer rule of having to at- 
tend classes on both days before 
and after. 

Suspension Also Explained 

In regard to the rule of the 
Discipline Committee that all stu- 
dents caught with women In their 
rooms after 6:30 would be liable 
to one year's suspension, Dean 
Brooks said that all colleges had 
an hour which was approximately 
the same as ours. The present 
hour is a "practical" one, for it 
See UC, page 6 



Compiled By ' 
Frank P. Reiche 

Question: Are you in favof of decreasing the college enroll- 
ment to its prewar level of 850, or would yow favor a moderate 
cut to 950 or 1000? while most of the students interviewed fav- 
ored the higher figure, it is interesting to note that some of them 
went so far as to suggest maintenance of the current enrollment, 
basing their arguments mainly on the increased costs incurred 
through a reduction. 

a 




Raymond Bald- to Amherst which has no such 
iwln '50, Chi Psl. clu**- Right now I'm living in 
'."None of us here Berkshire which doesn't seem too 
today know what crowded, particularly not so In 
it's like to have comparison to the Freshman 
8 5 undergrad- j Quad, for example. I guess a few 
uates at W 1 1- ' °' ^^^ fellows are crowded in M( 

gan. but a small cut might take 
care of these conditions. With 
the extra load of 1700 applica- 
tions, vfe ought to take as many as 
possible. In this way we might be 
able' to get a few more high school 
boys." 




Hams. Before we 
decide to return 
to our former enrollment, some- 
one must prove that the present 
conditions are poor — and they 
aren't. Economically it's Imprac- 
tical to cut the size of the stu- 
dent body by 250, or even to cut 
It by 100. A cut of 100 would re- 
duce college tuition revenues by 
some $60,000. This will have to 
be made up somewhere else, poss- 
ibly by a faculty reduction or lim- 
itations in our athletic program. 
Don't forget that a reversion to 
our prewar size of 850 would raise 
the cost per student considerably. 
I don't want Williams to become a 
wealthy-man's school again. Let's 
keep the wide variety of students 
we have now." 

O. Howard Mar- 
tin '52, Phi Delta 
Theta "The only 
reason I can see 
for reducing the 
size of the col- 
lege is If our pre- 
sent size means 
lower scholastic 
standards. In order to keep our 
faculty standards also high, we'll 
probably need to increase their 
salaries. The way I understand It, 
a cut In students would lower one 
source of Income for the College. 
As the fellow from California said 
in "Life," '1 would rather sit 100 
feet from a great man than 10 
feet from one who is Just barely 
mediocre.' Another important 
thing is the variety of extra-cur- 
rlcular activities, particularly 
sports. Now everyone gets a 
chance In athletics whether he's 
an A-No. 1 star or not- You miss 
this in a larger school." 

Harris "Pete" 
Fisher '51, Delta 
Psi "No, I don't 
think that the 
college should be 
decreased in 
number. As Wil- 
liams stands to- 
day, a fair repre- 
sentation of all classes and types 
of people can be found. I'm a- 
frald we'll get that 'rlch-man's- 
school' tag again if we cut enroll- 
ment and have to raise prices. 
Our athletic system is another 
reason why I'd hate to see a de- 
crease. As is. we've got a good 
coaching staff. It would be too 
bad to lose any of them for finan- 
cial reasons. As far as these so- 
called crowded conditions go, I 
don't think they're unbearable. I 
live in Morgan and haven't found 
myself cramped for studying and 
sleeping space. I would Just as 
soon see them Increase the enroll- 
ment instead of decreasing it." 





Charles Albertl 
'50. Phi Sigma 
Kappa "Under 
the existing con- 
ditions. I would 
rather see the 
college cut down 
to prewar size. 
The way things 
are now. it's too crowded around 
here. If we did cut down — say. 150 
or 200. I don't think we'd be de- 
priving 150 or 200 fellows from 
getting a college education be 
cause this difference would be 
made up by other schools. To me, 
the most appealing factor about 
Williams is its student-faculty 
ratio. At all costs we must main 
tain this ratio. I'm not too well 
informed as to the financial 
change such a decrease will cause, 
but you can't raise the cost per 
student very much if you want as 
much variety as we have now 
would prefer a smaljer faculty of 
higher calibre if I had to choose 
between the two. Don't make Wil 
Hams into a factory, though!" 

Brendan Par 
rington '51, Gar- 
field Club "I 
can't see why pe 
ople want to re 
duce the size of 
the College 
When you stop 
to consider the 
consequences of this, you. see how 
much it would cost everyone 
First, the school itself will suffer 
financially ; then the social, units 
will naturally receive a cut in 
their revenue; but even more Im 
portant than the effect on either 
the college or houses, is the un 
avoidable rise in student costs. 
As It stands now, we've got a 
good cross-section of fellows here 
— I don't want to scare away any 
prep or high school boys by ex- 
cessive prices. If there is to be 
some enrollment decrease, I im- 
agine that the Club could bear the 
brunt of it originally, but if they 
cut down very far, fraternities 
will have to prepare themselves 
for a corresponding cut." 

Donald Vogel 




In Adelphic Debate 




George W. Poltiion, Cambridge 
Univenity itudent who supported the 
offirmafive in the Adelphic Union- 
English student debate. Resolved: 
Thot Morsholl Plan old should cease. 



Schumaii At 
Peace Meeting 

Blames USSR For 

Part Of War Danger 



Debaters Laud, 
Sharply Attack 
Marshall Plan 



Parlisnn .^udieni-e Poll 

Favors Ncj;ative Side 

Hy 3 To 1 Majority 



Russia must share some of the 
responsibility for the present de- 
terioration of international rela- 
tions and the increasing war dan- 
ger, according to Professor Fred- 
erick L. Schuman in a speech de- 
livered to a booing audience at 
the Cultural and Scientific Con- 
Terence for World Peace held last 
weekend In New York. 
Professor Schuman was a sponsor 
of the conference, which was de- 
nounced by the State Department 
and others as a sounding-board 
for Communist propaganda. He 
went on to state that America's 
"war-4isease" had its counterpart 
"among the leaders and peoples 
of the East." 

"Ideological Fanaticism" 
Professor Schuman declared 
that the United States and Soviet 
Russia held the answer, between 
them, to world war or world peace. 
The two great nations, he said, 
had different social and economic 
systems but that was no reason 
they should not co-exist in peate. 
"The Soviet Union and the 
Communist regimes allied with it." 

See SCHUMAN, Page 6 



SAC Studies 
Ads, Publicity 





'51, Delta Phi 
"Don't cut down 
as long as we're 
not overcrowded 
Some guys have 
been under the 
impression that 
it's crowded in 
Payerweather, but I don't think 
Robert Worley'ifs very bad. Right now I don't 
'49, Qarfleld Club J think it's fair for the college to 
"Perhaps we'll cut down when so many fellows 
tfave to cut down want a college education. I sup- 
sbm^, but let's pose the Club has suffered more 
not dut any more than any of the fraternities, but 
than we have to. if they build that new proposed 
At present the club, this situation will be taken 



Committee Recommends 
Five-Point Program 



Club Is an un- care of. We're lucky compared to 
wleldy group. If they're going to some schools — at least we haven't 
maintain the college at this level, ben forced to sleep in the gym. 
then let's have two clubs. Be- Probably if we keep the same 
caiise . of the crowded conditions, number of undergrads we have 
the Club could probably take now. our athletics will continue 
moat of the loss. I fftvor'that new to improve. With about 1100 stu- 
plan whereby the Club would get dents, we can offer more courses SAC responsible for the manage- 
20% of each incoming class. This and perhaps one or two new ma- ment of the Adviser. Motzer 
would allow us to retain the un- Jors." pointed out, "There is an SAC 

Ique position we hold with regard , Bee POLL, Page 6 ' See SAC, Page 6 



Five recommendations to im- 
prove news and publicity on the 
Williams campus were made 
Tuesday afternoon to the SAC by 
a committee organized March 15 
to investigate the problem. 

Cftflyle T. Motzer '50, chair- 
man of the committee, stated that 
the recommendations were made 
to insure a more efficient man- 
agement of The Adviser, improve 
the appearance of the campus 
landscape,- and insure a more e- 
qual apportioiunent of advertis- 
ing among the extra-curricular 
activities. 

Five-Point Program 

The committee suggested: Hrst 
— ^That the Adviser be made an 
adjunct of the SAC, subsidized by 
an SAC grant each semester bas- 
ed on operating expenses and 
profit ratio of the last two sem- 
esters. All surplus funds received 
by the Adviser, once the semes- 
ter grant has been repaid, are 
to accrue t6 the SAC treasury. 
There will be one member of the 



Highlighted by numerous qulips 
and jabs between the two British 
gentlemen from Cambridge Uni- 
versity and the unscheduled ap- 
pearance of a dour-looking boxer 
who sniffed longingly at bewhlsk- 
ered George WllUam Pattison, the 
annual Adelphic Union-English 
student debate scored heavily be- 
fore a responsive audience in, 
Jesup Hall Monday evening. 

Following the final rebuttal by 
Mr. Pattison. a partisan crowd 
voted approximately three to one 
In favor of the negative on the 
subject Resolved: That Marshall 
Plan aid should cease, much to 
the gratification of Denzil K. 
Freeth and Charles Jensch '50, 
who supported that side. 

Freeth Wins Audience 
In the opening affirmative ar- 
gument, Jack McConnell '50 
charged that "the Marshall Plan 
is based on a wrong diagnosis" 
and that the crux of the problem 
lies in the internal Inflationary 
activities of the European states. 
He declared that Europe would 
not be solvent by 1952, since the 
plan was "based on fictitious 
markets and mystical coopera- 
tion." 

"Here I am, a timorous English 
virgin on the brink of an Adel- 
phic Union", piped Denzil Freeth 
and Immediately won the hearts 
of the audience. In a more serious 
vein, he asserted as causes for the 
Marshall Plan a devasted Europe 
and a "rampant Communism In 
Russia," and stressed "Marshall 
Aid is our economic bomb." 
Condemns Marshall Aid 
Arguing that England has be- 
come a satellite of the U. S. and 
that the Marshall Plan will make 
Europe more dependent on us, 
Pattison sharply termed Marshall 
aid as "the price we pay for the 
maintenance of two American 
traditions", American immigra- 
tion laws and American Insistence 
on maintaining high tariff walls. 
In attempting to answer 
"whether or not the U. S, can give 
support for the Marshall Plan", 
Jensch pointed to the economic 
and political advantages It de- 
rives from this program. He de- 
scribe^l the Marshall Plan as an 
"economic means to a political 
end" and gave as evidence the re- 
cent gains made in France and 
Italy against the Communist tide. 



Firms Feel Need 
For Accountants 



Mathias Describes Field 
In Vocational Talk 



"Businesses are feeling a great 
need for bright young men in the 
accounting profession," declared 
David B. Mathias '26 as he de- 
scril}ed accounting opportunities 
in a vocational talk to a group of 
undergraduates at the Zeta Psi— 
house Monday evening. 

While still performing their ori- 
ginal function of "preventing and 
detecting error and fraud," he 
stated, accountants have entered 
the new field of "internal audit- 
ing" in which they "assist man- 
agement in achieving the most 
efficient administration of the 
operations' of the organization." 
Starting SaUrtei 

Young men may enter either 
the public or the internal fields 
of accounting. In the former they 
See MATHIAS, page 6 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



f tr^ Wmijip^ m^^f^ 



North Adoms, Mossochtisetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adoms, Massochusetts, under the Act of Morch 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miiler, Lamb and l-lunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, Telephone 72. 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) Editor 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) News Editor 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 c ,,, cju-„ 

Walter P. Stern '50 ,.. ^°'*^ "'*°'' 

William R. Barney '49 w Senior Associate 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Blaschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson. 

Editoriol Stoff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F.' Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hostings. 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. AAocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. 
Stoff Photographer ' John R. Kimberly 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 .-.n _ . ., 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 8"^'"«=^ Manager 

Harry Frailer, III '51 :..t t..:. - .-..:7Tr...r .r.-- -.. Advertising Manager 

Douglas D, Garfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Edward C. Stebbins'51 , Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 Treasurer 



Volume XLIU 



March 30, 1949 



Number 8 




Due to Spring vacation, with this issue the RECORD sus- 
pends publication until April 16. 

Is 850 Too Small? 

Nowhere is the evidence of the divergence of opinion between 
students and alumni so evident as in the problem of the future size 
'of Williams College. To the best of our knowledge, alumni support 
is almost 100 per cent in support of the prewar size of 850, or even 
less than that, while a RECORD poll of nine students (see Page 1) 
found eight of them favoring a sizable increase over the prewar 
level. While this 8-1 ratio probably does not mirror exactly the 
opinion of the undergraduate body as a whole, it does serve as evl-> 
dence that a lange majority of students are opposed to the o>>er- 
whelming alumni sentiment. - 

Alumni usually substantiate their opinion by poinjlflg to the 
present overcrowding of dormitories, labs, and classyo<5ms, but this 
reasoning does not hold. Most students find little pr no inconvenience 
and considerable financial saving by rooming/three students to a 
double room. They save $45 per year in- ropnirent plus one-third the 
cost of furnishing their rooms. There are some rooms, of course, 
where three men is definitely overgrowding, but they can be elimin- 
ated by a cut of about 100 studehts. The rooming problem does not 
call for a cut all the way back down to 850. 

Even an enroUmenj; to 850 necessitates the building of larger 
labs, which are planned for in the Fund Drive, and these will serve 
as well for an enrollment of 950 to 1000. The size of classes and the 
\student-faculty^atio is an integral element of a Williams education 
a:nd will/be kept the same regardless of the over-all size of the 
coileg&slilt has been essentially the same this year, with an enrollment 
oJ^<129 in October (a little over 1050 now as a result of February 
'graduations), as it was before the war. "* 

Most alumni are firm in their view, however, and this must be 
explained by a Very natural .phenomenon. That is, most loyal alumni 
from any college riaturally feel that the college that educated them 
was, in every essential respect, the best college that could possibly 
exist. This is particularly true with respect to the size of the col- 
lege. The more loyal an alumnus is to the ideals of a Williams edu- 
cation, the more vehement his ^opposition is likely to be to any 
change in the conditions of "his time." There is nothing we cherish 
more than alumni interest in the college, but it must be remembered 
that Williams is^not a static, unchanging institution. Loyalty to the 
college of the past can do present-day Williams more harm than 
good. 

Financial Difliculties '^«^ 

It may be that our favoring a larger college, say 950 to 1000, is 
motivated by this same phenomenon, that we naturally think the 
size of the college we are being educated in is the best possible, but 
there are some very sound reasons, mainly financial /ones, to back it 
up. The loss of tuition from over 200 men cannot- be made up for 
wholly by the reduction of faculty and other costs that would ensue. 
Coal, college employees other than faculty, and many maintenance 
and administration costs are fixed and cannot be reduced propor- 
tionately with the size of the student body. The difference will have 
to be made up by either the alumni or the students. 

Any cutback would also hit the social units hard, many of which 
have a hard time making both ends meet under present conditions. 
A cut in the enrollment of 200 students would be a cut of about ten 
men per fraternity, which, for the average house, would mean the 
loss of $1000 in dues per year, plus a large decrease in income from 
room rent. This loss would have to be spread among the remaining 
students, all of which would further contribute to increasing the 
cost of a Williams education. Neither would the Garfield Club be 
spared financially in such a reduction. 

This financial problem, together with the problem of crowded 
educational facilities throughout the country, argues for keeping 
Williams at its maximum possible size, at least until such time as 
these two situations are considerably eased. At that time, when it is 
no longer necessary to have financial needs almost dictating educa- 
tional policies if the college is to survive in any form, the discussion 
of the size of the college can again turn around other problems. 

The "Small" College 

Among these other problems are the curriculum, athletics, and 
the nebulous ideal of a "small" college. We wonder if the new psy- 
chology and Spanish majors (see Page 1) would have been possible 
in a college of 850, and, if so, whether or not their installation 
would have been at the expense of some other major. When enroll- 
ment is cut by one-flfth, the variety of courses offered must also be 
cut (although not necessarily also by one-fifth), and this in a world 
_which is growing more and more complex and. even in liberal arts. 
Is calling for a more varied college curriculum. 

A permanent policy of larger enrollment would result in com- 
paratively better athletic teams. This would enable Williams to play 
larger and better-known colleges, which would give us more pub- 
licity and act as a drawing caird for both prep and high school stu- 
dents. 

Although how small a "small" college is has always been a mute 
point, the Ideal has always been present and Has served as a large 
attraction for places like Williams. But a college of 850, we claim, is 
too small and offsets this advantage by making more difficult the 
problems of finance, curriculum, and publicity, pne thousand or 960 
students is still a small college today, with all the advantages of a 
small college, but with not so many of its disadvantages. 

The Undergraduate Council wlU (liscuss this problem, through 
the social units, shortly after vacation, 

.: ■- l' - 



BOOZE IN NEW HAVEN— Tired of its international' notoriety for 
almost constant inebriation, Yale last week initiated a sclentlflcally 
distilled poll on student drinking habits throughout the land. The 
tabulation is being oonducted by the Alcohol Studies Division of 
the University's Labratory of Applied Psychology, which believes 
there have been too many wild tales of drinking among students, and 
wants to set the record straight. 

To do this, some 5000 questionnaires, each containing 100 ques- 
tions, have been sent to eighty campuses. The researchers want to 
And out why students drink, and if not, why not. They also want un- 
dergrad opinions on whether or not the young ladles should take a 
nip now and then. Final Report will be made in two years. . 
ASSASSINATION AT DARTMOU'TH— An interesting sidelight on 
the much publicized death of Dartmouth student Raymond CiiTOtta 
was provided last Saturday by Tass, Russian news ageiicy, quoting 
from the Daily Worker. The Tass dispatch blamed anti-Communist 
"hysteria" for the death, saying that Cirrotta"s friends and relatives 
were convinced he was the victim of a political assassination for his 
support of Henry Wallace. 

VACATION ENTERTAINMENT— Here are the vacation- dates of a 
few of the more local girls' colleges for those who are planning a little 
diversion over the spring holidays. " 

Smith, March 26 - April 4; Vassar, April 8 - April 18; Wellesley, 
April 2 - 12; Skldmore, March 26 - April 3; Holyoke, April 2 - U; 
Connecticut College, March 26 - April 4; Colby, March 26 - April 12. 
BLOODMOBILE HERE— The Red Crpsi' Bloodmobile will return to 
Williamstown on Tuesday, April 2%ythe unit will be at the Faculty 
House from 10 am. to 4 p.m. aaXheX date. The need for a large blood 
bank is extremely urgent kyVne present time, according to the Red 
Cross, which desires to fufnish whole blood and all blood derivatives 
to all people pt thlS/Ctjuntry, irrespective of race, creed, or financial 
status. Appointm^is are mow being made with donors, and all stu- 
dents desirin|^t6 contribute are urged to get their parents' permission. 
BEARS 9KrwOLVES— Rumor has it that the Russian press is get- 
ting a^ttle curious about an elaborate aerial wolf hunt which is re- 
po;;ted to be under way in northern Finland. The territory in which 
-the hunt is taking place is the Finnish Lapland, bordering on the 
Soviet Union. Results to date from the organized expedition are four 
dead wolves. The Reds suspect that the poor results "support the 
theory that the hunt has more Important purposes:" 
MIGHT WORK HERE— Starting April 1, the town of Douglas, Qeor 
gia, will observe "Leave Us Alone Week." During the seven days 
which follow, the town's business men are going to devote themselves 
entirely to their own business, free from the importunities of various 
charities and worthy causes to lend a helping hand, or a store 
window, which the merchants accept without flinching the remaining 
358 days. 



I 

Letters To The Editor 



To the Editor of the Williams Record: 

There Is on file in the business office of WMS a contract effect- 
ive March 5, 1949, and signed by Prank Reiche as business manager 
of the Williams Purple Knights This contract calls for a weekly 
engagement of one hour and a half each Saturday afternoon at the 
Williams tan. 

Following the appearance of Mr. Olesen's letter in the Record 
of March 23, we feel that an explanation is in order concerning the 
band which plays at the Inn on Saturdays. This band is the PURPLE 
KNIGHTS QUARTET! Any mixup which may have occurred as to 
the group's Identity, came as the result of a misunderstanding be- 
tween both parties. 

We believe that Mr. Olesen merely wished to convey the idea 
that the instrumentalists at the Inn are not the Purple Knights 
full band which has played on campus and at other colleges. At 
first we mistakenly billed the band as "The Purple Knights," but 
this error has been rectified to the satisfaction of both parties, so 
that the band is now advertised as 'The Purple Knights Quartet." 

Carl Motzer 
March 27, 1949 Business Mapager —WMS 



Final Exam Schedule 



Tuesday, May 31, 9 a.m.: Math 
2-16, 17 H; Math 2a-6,7,8,ll H; 
Math4-1,2,4,5 Gr; Math 6-6,7 
Gr. 1:30 p.m.: Art 6-10 L; Biolo- 
gy 20-20 TBL; Chem 4-21 TCL; 
Econ 8-11,13,15 H; French 2-2 
Gr; French 8-6 L; Geology 10- 
Cl; Latin 4-9 St; Math 14-16,17 
H; Music 6-AMT; Phil 8-8 H; 
Religion 6-4 L; Spanish 6-6 H. 
Wednesday, June 1, 9 a.m.: Phil 4 
-2Gr; Poll Sci 2-6,7,8,11,12,15,16, 
17 H; Pub Spki 2-4 Gh. 1:30 p.m. 
Geology 2-Cl; ROTC 3-2 Gr; 
ROTC 4-1 Gr. 

Thursday, June 2, 9 a.m.: English 
2 - 1,2,4,5,6,7 Gr.; 4 Oh.; Eni- 
llsh6 - 6,7,8 H.; 1:30 p.m.: As- 
tronomy 2 - 13 H.; Chemistry 8 

- 21 TCL; Greek 10 - 6,7,8 H.; 
Economics 10-2 Gr.; Physics 14- 
1 TPL; Pol. Sci. 18-4 Oh.; Reli- 
gion 2 - 15 H. 

Friday, June 3, 9 a.m.: Art 4 - 
10 L.; Chemistry 2 - 19,21 TCL; 
Chemistry 2a - 19,21 TCL; Eng- 
lish 16-8 H.; French 14-9 St.; 
Geology 12 - CI.; German 10 - 
6 H.; History 10 - 6 Or.; Latihr 6 

- 8 ip.; Music 2-4 Gh.; Pol. Sci 
8-4 Or.; Religion 4 - 11 H.; 
Spanish 8 - 12 H.; 1:30 p.m.: As- 
tronomy 4 ■* 13 H.; Biology 10 - 
20 TBL; Chemistry 10 - 10 TCL; 
Chemistry 12 - 16 TCL; CI. Civ. 2 

- 4,6 Oh.; English 14 - 6,7,8 H.; 
German 8-8 St.; Math 8-17 
H.; Music 4 - AMT; Philosophy 
6 - 16 H.; Physics 12 - 1 TPL; 
Pol. Sci. - 1.2,4,6, 6 Or. 
Saturday, June 4, 9 B.m.: Econ- 
omics 6 - 1,2,4.5.6.7 Or.; 1:30 p.^, 
Oermon 2 - 6,8 H.; Oeifman 3a 

- 8 St.; German 4-4 Oh,; Span- 



ish 2-6 L.; Spanish 4 - 11,12 H. 
Monday, June 6. 9 a.m.: Art 20 - 
6 L.; Economics 20 - 2,4,5 Or.; 
English 20 - 6,8 H.; History 20 - 
6 Or.; A.H.&L. 20-1 Or.; Music 
20 - AMT; Philosophy 20-7 Or.; 
Physics 2 - 1,10 TPL; -Physics 4 - 
1,10 TPL; Physics 20 - 16 TPL; 
Pol. Econ. 20-7 H.; Pol. Sci. 20 - 

11 H.; 1:30 p.m.: English 4 - 6,7, 
8,15 H.; 1,2,4,5,6,7 Or.; Geology 
20 - CI.; ROTC 1 - 4,6 Gh. 
Tuesday, June 7, 9 a.m.: Art 2 - 
4,5,6,10 L.; Astronomy 6-13 H.; 
Chemistry 6 - 10 TCL; Economics 

12 - 8 H.; Geology 8 - CI.; H&M 
of Science - 21 TCL; History 12 - 
4 L.; Pol. Sci. 6 - 6,6 Or.; Psych. 4 
- 14 TBL; Spanish 6a - 6 H; 1:30 
p.m.: Art 8 - 4 L.; Biology 2 - 14, 
20 TBL; 21 TCL; 
20 TBL; 21 TCL 
Or.; History 8 - 1 
16- H.; Music 10 
sophy 12-6 Gh, 
TPL; Russian 2 
Wednesday, June 8, 9 a.m.: Eco- 
nomics 2 - 1,2,4.5.6.7 Or.; 4 Gh.; 
Economics 4 - 6,7,8,11, 12, 16 H.; 
1:30 p.m.: English 8 -,,6,7,8. H.; 
French 4 - 15 H.; French 6 - 1,2 

Or. ,; 

.■ t ■ 
Thursday, June 9, 9 a.m. 
6 - 1,2 Or.; Physics 6 - 
1:30 p.m.: Art 10 - 10 L 
6 - 14 TBL; Drama 2 
Economics 14 - 8 H.; French 6a - 

1 Or.; German 6-9 Oh.; Latin 
8-9 St.; Music 8 -AMT; Philo- 
sophy 10 - 6 Oh.; Pol. Sci. 10 - B 
Or.; Psych. 2-4 Oh.; ROTC 2 - 

2 Or.; StatUtlcs 3 - 19 H. 

See EXAM, page 6 



Biology 4 - 14, 
French 10-2 
Or.; Math 10 - 
■ AMT; Phllo- 
Physics 8-10 
6 Or. 



,: History 
10 TPL; 

; Biology 
- AMT; 



mmma 



APRIL 1 



IS THE DAY WE OPEN FOR THE SEASON 

Join your friend* Friday rtlflht for tho Ipaf blast 

before Yocotion. 



THE SAME 

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AND GOOD 

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Williomitown 



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For Information Write 

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BODY and FENDER WORK 

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It's CUTTING'S for 
Spring wearables 



Sport Coots, Gabardine Slacks, Golf Jocket, 
Sweaters, Sport Shirts, Socks and Shoes - - - 

CUTTING'S in North Adorns can show you 
tome of. the finest clothing available at mo- 
dest prices. 



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INTERWOVEN BVD - BATES 



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NIW rORMULA WITH vrMTOL* 

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It looks natural ... It 
feels natural . . .and 
it stays in place I 
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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



YOUR DATE WILL LOVE IT 

Forget the clock ot the Biltmore, its old stuff. Today 
it's the Ladles Cocktail Lounge and Dining Room' pt 
the Williams Club. Fine food and drink in sharp sur- 
roundings. 

24 East 39th Street is "on campus" in Manhattan, 
but with a dif-ference. Rooms overnight for undergrad- 
uates ot speciol rates; Bar and Grill under the super- 
vision of the famous John; theatre ticket service by 
Stanley. 

. "^he Williams eiub 

24 East 39th St., New York City 

Undergraduates are always welcome! 

It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 




means 

WEDDING 

TIME 



FOR THE EASY TO CHOOSE, INEXPENSIVE 
YET PLEASING AND DELIGHTFUI 



WEDDING GIFTS 




• SILVERWARE - Sterling 


^ns 




• GLASSWARE - Swedish 
Italian, Mexican, domestic 


V 




• LINEN - Luncheon and 
dinner sets 


x^r 




• hand blocked linen 
cocktail napkins 


0>uptxy 

WILLIAMSTOVN 
MAMACHUJtTT* 




• Honeymoon cocktail set 

• Bennington Pottery 






^^^i^ J 





Grads Receive 
Travel Offer 

Fulbright Act Presents 
Year Of Free Study 



Under the provisions o( tlie 
Fulbright Act, passed In August 
1946, members of this year's grad- 
uating class are offered an ex- 
pense-paid year of study abroad, 
If successful In a series of screen- 
ing examinations. 
f Sponsored by Senator J. W. 
Fulbright of Arkansas, the law 
Is designed to bring about broad- 
er International understanding 
and to use up currencies and funds 
acquired through the sale of sur- 
plus property abroad. Graduate 
students receive payment In for- 
eign currency for transportation, 
tuition, maintenance and other 
incidental expenses according to 
their need and their scholastic 
achievements. 

Veterans wishing to continue 
their education under Public Law 
346 may also apply for a Fulbright 
grant in local currency to cover 
such extra expenses of overseas 
study as round-trip transporta- 
tion and supplementary mainten- 
ance. They must compete with 
other candidates on the basis of 
their personal and scholastic 



EuropeanTalk'^MT Committee To Produce 
Oflfered Soon Revised 'All Ihe King^s Men' 



Miss Fairfac To Speak 
After Spring Recess 



All those planning trips a- 
broad this summer will be Inter- 
ested In attending a talk to be 
given by Miss Jean Palrfac con- 
cerning European conditions on 
Wednesday, April 13, at 7:30 p.m. 
In No. 3 Griffin Hall. Miss Fair- 
fac, who has been engaged in a 
rehlbilltatlon program in Austria 
with the American Friends Ser- 
vice Committee for the last three 
years, retiuned recently to this 
country In order to encourage 
those willing to help In this work. 
AIthdugJi"her "primary purpose 
is to recruit students interested 
in such a program, those who 
merely intend to travel in Europe 
this summer will find it worth- 
while to attend, for she should be 
able to answer questions concern- 
ing traveling conditions and the 
relative extent to which the de- 
vasted areas have recovered. 



qualifications. 

Applicants are given prelimin- 
ary screening by The Institute of 
International Education, 2 West 
45th Street, New York 19, N. Y. 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adams 









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Lucktas' fin* tobacco picki you up w^on you're —mild, ripe, light tobacco. No woi^^er more indepen- 

low . . . caimi you down whon you're tense— puts dent tobacco experts— auctioneers, layers and ware- 

you on the Lucky level i That's why it's so important housemen— smoke Luckies regularly thi^^ the next two 

to remember that Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco leading brands combined! G6t a carton of Cuckies todayl 

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Prize For Toleranoe 

To Amherst Fraternity 

Phi Alpha Psl, formerly the 
Alpha of Phi Kappa Psl, Am- 
herst fraternity which was ex- 
pelled from the national or- 
ganization as a result of pledg- 
ing Negro Thomas W. Gibbs, 
was honored March 23 by the 
"Council Against Intolerance 
in America", which awarded 
members of Phi Alpha Psl one 
of the five annual Thomas Jef- 
ferson prizes for progress a- 
galnst Intolerance. - 



Glee Qiib Sings 
Sunday On Radio 

CoDoert In Bronxville 

Also Given Saturday 



Climaxing a month of intensive 
activity, the Williams Glee Club 
presented a half-hour radio 
broadcast on Sunday afternoon. 
The program, which was heard 
over the New England regional 
network of NBC, was sponsored 
by the Monsanto Chemical Co. 
and originated in the Adams 
Memorial Theater. 
This concert was the fifth which 
the Glee Club has presented in 
four successive weeks, and was 
proceeded the night before by a 
concert given for the Junior 
League of Bronxville, New York. 
President Baxter Speaks 

During the broadcast, President 
James P. Baxter, 3rd spoke brief- 
ly on the place of a glee club in a 
liberal arts college- He .stressed 
the point that glee clubs have 
"come of age", in that they no 
longer devote their entire pro 
grams to the singing of "barber 
shop ditties, sentimental love bal 
lads, and football songs." 

The previous night's program 
given in the Bronxville High 
School Auditorium, was enthus- 
iastically received by a capacity 
audience of almost 800 people who 
demanded an encore. 

Program Given 

Among the works presented on 
both programs were a Bach 
"Drinking Song", Weelkes' "Hark 
All Ye Lovely Saints '. and "Ran- 
tin', Rovin' Robin", an arrange- 
ment by A. T, Davison of a Scotch 
folk-song. The Glee Club also 
sang "Simon Legree ' by Douglas 
Moore, and two pieces arranged 
by Professor Barrow, one of them 
an English folk-song entitled 
"The Turtle-Dove", and the o 
ther a fantasy on Williams songs 
called "Williamsiana. " 

The next concert will be in 
Wllliamstown on April 30 with 
the Wellesley College Glee Club 
Among other joint numbers which 
will be presented at that time 
will be two choruses from Mozart 
"Requiem", which the Glee Club 
sang with the Bennington Glee 
Club in Carnegie Hall in 1947 
The season's last concert will be 
a solo engagement in Town Hall 
on May 12. 



New Version Of Play 

By Warren CombineB 

Best Of Verse, Prose 



Robert Penn 'Warren's "All the ■ 
King's Men" will be produced by 
the Adams Memorial Theatre 
Committee on Friday and Sat- 
urday evenings, April 22 and 23, 
as the fUth play of the 1948-49 
season. 

The play was first written as a 
poetic drama entitled "Proud 
Flesh", but never was produced 
under that name. For a Univer- 
sity of Minnesota production the 
name was changed to "All the - 
King's Men" because of the in- 
tervening appearance of 'Warren's 
Pulitzer Prize novel, which en- 
compasses the action of the play. 

After publication of his novel, 
Warien wrote another version of 
the play, this time entirely in 
prose, which was produced in New 
York City. 

New Version Here 

The AMT version, combining 
the best of the prose with the 
best of the verse, has never before 
been produced by any dramatic 
group. It has been filmed in Hol- 
lywood and will be released soon. 

Robert Penn Warren is a well- 
known author, poet, and teacher. 
His first novel, "Night Rider", 
was published in 1939 and receiv- 
ed much critical acclaim. 

After attending Oxford as a 
Rhodes scholar, 'Warren returned 
to the United States to teach and 
has been a professor of English 
at the University of Minnesota 
since 1942. He probably is best 
known to Williams freshmen as 
co-editor of the English 1-2 text- 
book "Understanding Poetry." 




BKAUSE THEY PREPARED FOR 
SMOOTH VACATION DRIVINO WITH OUR 

Vncothn Speeint 

• adjust brakes 

• adjust clutch 

• check steering 

• tune engine 

• inspect electrical 

system 

• lubrication 

• inspect tires 




HERBERT A. ORR CO. 

Curran Highway 

North Adams, Moss. 



Haven't You Heard? 

WE ARE OPENING ON FRIDAY 
APRIL 1 FOR THE SEASON 
LUNCHEON and DINNER 

"Good food with a history" 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

^ 

FORT MASSACHUSETTS 

en Route 2 between North Adamt and Williamrtown 
For retervotiont call North Adomi 770 



eoni., THI AMIRIOAN TOMCAO AOWAMT , 



:-^m-:' ' 






».:.*'■'- 



■•^■f^'^ 



THE WILLI A\\S RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



Purple Spuads Head South For Annual Spring 




8i 



Stickmen Tackle Midshipmen 
In Pre-Season Game Monday 



Scrimmages Wilh RPI 
Prep Lacrosse Team 
For Vacation Games 



Blessed with good weather, per- 
mitting practice on Cole Field and 
two scrimmages with RPI's "Ol- 
ympic" team, the Eph stickmen 
will be in good form when they 
take the field against Navy at 
Annapolis Monday for the first 
game of their southern Spring 
trip. 

A week ago, the Purple worked 
out against the Trojans and 
showed to good advantage des- 
pite the tack of regular practice. 
In sore need of conditioning, the 
team has worked out hard, and 
plans to give RPI a good battle 
in another scrimmage this after 
noon at Troy. 

Heavy Schedule 

Following Monday's Navy game, 
the Ephmen will play Maryland, 
Loyola, and Delaware on succes- 
sive, and it is hoped successful, 
days. After a day's rest they will 
take on Duke University Satur- 
day at Durham, N.C. This heavy 
schedule Should put the Purple 
in mid-season form when they 
open their home slate , against 
Union April 16. 

Led by Captain Austy Taha- 
ferro, the first midfield boasts 
high-scoring threats in Phil Van 
Dusen and Buzz Brumbaugh. Also 
likely to see action are Ronnie 
Chute, John Schluter, Dave Pyn- 
chon, Gordy Clark and Coke Sco- 
field. Heading the attack are Pat 
Graney, Ed Maynard, and Gordy 
Mc'WiUiams. Backing them up 
are Dave Van Alstyne, and Norm 
Wood. 

Strong Defense 

Last Year's first string defense 
composed of Howie Simpson, 
Bob Donoho, and Mark Reynolds 
is still in the same slot, with Dave 
Young, Charlie Arnold, and Bill 
Coldwell fighting for Jobs in the 
back zone. Tending the nets is 
pint-sized Mickey O'Connell, with 
Phil Boote and Gene Foley in re- 
serve. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



WE SUPPLY 

WILLIAMS 

FRATERNITIES 

WITH 

COAL 

AND FUEL OIL 




Thomas McMahon & Son 
73 Spring St. 



Golf Captain 




Jerry Cole '50, who leads the '49 
Eph golf team. 



Cole Captains 
'49 Golf J earn 



Leading this year's golf team 
will be Jerry Cole, veteran of three 
year's varsity experience at Will- 
iams. Number two man on the 
squad last year. Jerry goes into 
the 1949 season with an outstand- 
ing record in intercollegiate play 
of 20 wins, 5 losses and four ties. 

High School Star 

Besides his impressive inter- 
collegiate record, Cole has gar- 
nered honors in tournament play 
outside the collegiate ranks. La.st 
spring, he got to the third round 
of .the New York State Amateur 
Championship. While still in high 
school in New Rochelle, N.Y. 
where he was captain of the go!f 
team in his senior year, Jerry won 
the Westchester Scholastic Tour- 
nament and twice reached the 
semi-finals of the New York State 
Junior Championship. 

A member of the Garfield Club, 
Cole was a sports writer on the 
RECORD in his sophomore and 
junior years. Of this year's team 
he says, "We'll be out to beat Wes- 
leyan." 



Frosh Track learn Shows 
Promise In Early Practice; 
Girds For lough Schedule 



Although it is still too early in the season to draw any definite 
conclusions, the possibilities of Coach Anthony Plansky's freshman 
track squad having a successful season seem very good. To date 
the team has only had a few organized practices, but from all early 
ndications Coach Plansky will have a sizeable group of capable 
performers to choose from when the team faces its first test on 
■Ipril 28 against Mass. State. 

Tne team will pack a strong one-two punch in the sprints with 
Jack Harris and Jack Brody, who are both excellent runners. Harris 
Aeht to the Cranbrook School in Detroit. Brody, who attended 
^oly Prep in Brooklyn, has run the 100 in :09.7 and competed in a 
number of indoor meets this winter. 

Haskell Fast 

Jim Haskell, who ran a 2:05 half-mile last year for the Berk- 
shire School, will compete in both that event and the mile. Also 
running in the half-mile will be John Freese, John McAloon and 
Cooper Smith. 

Mllers include Dave Hastings, Doug Wilson and Haskell, who are 
all capable of doing under 4:50. Pete Smith and Bob Reigel, in the 
quarter-mile, both run in the :52's. 

Pole Vault 

Coach Plansky is fortunate in having a quartet of capable pole 
vaulters all of whom can do 11 '6" or better, including Charlie Ham- 
ilton, who has vaulted as high as 12'6". 

Dick Edwards and George McAleenan will compete in the high 
jump, and both are better than satisfactory performers. 
Hurdlers Strong 

Gus Campbell and Dick Walters will run in the low hurdles, 
while George Steinbrenner, an outstanding performer during the 
recent indoor season, will see action in both the high and low hurdles. 
Steinbrenner, a graduate of Culver Military Academy, took fifth 
place in the New England AAU championships, and also placed 
in the Ohio state AAU championships. 

The one apparent weakness in the team's strength appears to 
be in the weights- Although Archie Beard. Dick Kraft and Dave 
Walch have tried out in this division, it seems doubtful that the 
team will be as strong as possible in the weight events. 



Little Three Baseball Champs 
To Journey To NY^NJ Area 




Schaffl oHead 
lennis Team 




COLORADO 



SPRING SKIING 

unsurpassed 

ALL EXPENSE SKI WEEK 

beginning 

March 27, April 3, 10, 17 

ending 

April 2, 9, 16, 23 

BUNK ROOM 
AND MEALS 

BUNK ROOM 
MEALS & LIFT 

BUNK ROOM 

MEALS, LIFTS b 
SKI LESSONS 

For reservation & information 
write or wire; 

HOTEL JEROME 
ASPEN, COLORADO 



$36.00 
$57.50 

$70.00 



BEFORE 

VACATION 



GET 



YOUR 



HAIR 



CUT 



BY 




Charles Schaaf '50 is captain 
of the 1949 tennis team. Schaaf 
has recently been elected presi- 
dent of the Williams Outing Club 
and a member of the SAC execu- 
tive council. In addition, he has 
been active in WMS and the Wil- 
liams Christian Association. 

Schaaf is a member of Delta 
Phi fraternity and lives in Chi- 
cago. A former Highland Park 
High School star, he was at one 
time ranked as the number one 
Junior tennis player in Illinois. 
Last Spring, Schaaf teamed with 
Fred Scribner, whom he succeeds 
as captain, to win the New Eng 
land doubles crown. 



Squad's Chance m 
As Yet Unknown 



'r>v«> iNew Contests 

Slated For Spring 

There have been two new added 
contests to the Spring Sports 
schedule. On May 18 the var- 
sity golf team will play a match 
with Dartmouth here, and on 
May 20, the 'Varsity Tennis 
Team will meet with Haverford 
College, also at Williamstown. 



Nine returning lettermei, 
form the nucleus of the 2( 
baseball squad which will 
a five game trip Into the 
York-New Jersey area durii 
cation. Bobby Coombs' 
Three champion ball club 
play Seton Hall, Rutgers, 
stra, Upsala and Princeton r 
successive days. 

The team had Its first oi 
workout last Saturday and i 
sequently still far from i 
Furthermore it is still noi 
tain whether pitcher Qeoriji 
mar's arm will come aroiii 
time to permit his makin, 
spring trip. Basketball ca, 
Dltmar won six of William- 
ven victories last year, incl^i 
the four Little Three contest 
the Holy Cross upset. 

Le Sate At Short 

At this early stage It looli 
if shortstop Don LeSage i.s 
only man sure of his posi; 
though it seems probable 
hard-hitting George Owen 
be the right fielder, when 1h 
not pitching. First base is v. ide 
open, with the versatile Bud I'ool 
Dick Manning and Pete Flshei ■ x- 
pected to battle It out. 

Interesting battles should .dso 
take place between veteran thud 
sacker Stan DeLlsser and sii|)li- 
omore star Ernie Mlerzejew.'iki 
and between catchers Jerry l':il- 
mierl and Fritz Zeller. Jim WuuBh 
Geroge Bush. Tom Healy and Ray 
Mason are all promising second 
basemen and the betting is si ill 
even as to who will get the nod. 

Ditmar again leads the mound 
staff but sophomores Harry Stiii'- 
hy and Bob Olsson have loolted 
very good in early workouts and 
should bolster the staff. wliii:h 
also In; ludes veterans Bob K.;v. 
I Fred Lanes and Bob John.slon. 
I Bill Kaufmann,, last year's num- 
ber two pitcher, is "no longer w ill 
us" and Harry Sutton, a promi> ;i8 
lefty is still sidelined with a st i- 
Ing injury. 



will 
nen 
ake 
■lew 
va- 
i.tle 
will 
iof- 
;ive 

loor 
on- 
idy. 
er- 
iit- 

m 

he 
iln 
se- 
nd 
-lid 



'lie 
I on, 
•iiai 
.vill 
is 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 

GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Morcella and Frank Ikeler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 

Route 2 
Opposite Howard Johns. 



Tel. 302-M 
Williamstown 



How much /i^ can you cram into a record? 



Hear 

musical kidding in 
"SUNFLOWER 

(an RCA Victor Kelease) 

and you'll know! 

You'll have a lot of fun with Ray 
McKinley, his band and his vocalist 
serving up a platterful of "corn" for 
your listening and dancing (^easure. 
Yes! Ray knows about musical pleas- 
ure—and smoking pleasure, too! As 
Ray beats it out on his drums — 
"Camels are a great cigarette— they're 
mild and full-flavored!" 




HoYiAfUV can a cigarette be? 

Smoke Camels for 30 days — and you'll know! 

In a recent coast-to-coast test of hundreds of men and 
women who smoked only Camels for 30 days — an 
average of one to two packs a day — noted throat spe- 
cialists, after making weekly examinations, reported 

NOT ONE SINGLE CASE OF THROAT IRRITATION 
DUE TO SMOKING 




, 1 



I/^^^. cai^^l. <IZ..^j^^^/.^ r ^'" Camel mitdnas for rounelf in rour own 
,AU>*t4y-mae* 'aua'tanfee.' .t-Zom.' t (or luct. T for throat, if. at .or 
(ime, you are not convinced that Camels are the mildett cigarette you've ever imoked, 
return the package with the unused Camels and you will receive its full purchase price, 
plus pottage. (SigmMt) R. J. Reroolds Tobacco Company, Wioston-S^lem, North Carolina. 



-■rr 

I 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS 
FOR THE NEW 



1949 



*yv}'U 



CONVERTIBLES AND STATION WAGONS 
FOR EARLY SPRING DELIVERY, 

HARRY SMITH, Incorporated 

North Adams 
your FORD and MERCURY dealer 



Yacht Groups 
Attend Meeting 

Completes Plans For 

New England Assoc, 



EMILY POST iay« --- 

that it is a polite gesture to take o gift 
to your hostess when visiting. 

WE SUGGEST Ronson table lighters, 

Kensingtonware, Cyma bureau clocks, 
or some of our beautiful demitosse cups 



Bastien^s 



HOPKINS 

FURNITURE 
STORE 

Furnishings for all the room 

• Large size mahogany & maple coffee tables 
$16.50 
• Round Troys 98c 
• Heavy base glasses 

highballs & old fashioned 
cocktail glasses $4.0Q dox. 
• Plastic table clothes 

• New oil cloth 79c a yard 

Serving Williams Men Since 1888 



In order to be present at an 
Important meeting at M.I.T. of 
which the purpose was to organ- 
ize a New England district sailing 
association and to practice for 
a full schedule of races, two teams 
and the secretary of the Yacht 
Club went to Boston last weekend. 

The two teams, consisting of 
Commodare Oliver Bardes '50, 
Charles Dinkey '52, John Klmber- 
ly '52, and William Maclay '52 
raced informally Saturday mor- 
ning and afternoon on the Charles 
River with other yacht clubs that 
were present. Saturday night the 
teams joined by the club secre- 
tary, Michael Luther '51, par- 
ticipated in the initial meeting of 
the New England Intercollegiate 
Sailing Association. 

New England District First 

The meeting was conducted by 
Leonard M. Fowle, secretary of 
ICYRA, who explained that be- 
cause of the steadily rising inter- 
est In college yacht racing and in 
preparation for the emergence of 
a national Inter-collegiate sailing 
as.sociation it Is necessary and 
fitting for the New England areas 
to be the first to establish a dis- 
trict division as "New England 
has always played a leading role 
in tlie Inter-Collegiate Y. R. A. 
activities." After the proposed by- 
laws were adopted, the officers of 
the new NEISA were elected, and 
the meeting broke up at 12:15a.m. 
following the completion of all 
other business. 

Also while in Boston the Com- 
modore and secretary carried out 
the actual purchasing of the third 
"Penguin." 



Richmond Allen '51 
New Squash Captain 

Richmond Allen '51, recently 
Elected by his teammates to 
head next year's squash team, 
Is one of the brightest pros- 
pects Williams has had in sev- 
eral years, according to Coach 
Clarence Chaffee. He took over 
the number one spot this year 
as a sophomore and sparked 
the team in several of Its vic- 
tories. 

A resident of Providence. R. 
I., Allen prepped at Middlesex 
in Concord, Mass. In addition 
to his squash tfctlvltles at Wil- 
liams he is also a member of 
the varsity teimls squad. Allen 
Is pledged to Zeta Psl frater- 
nity. 



Nine Golfers To Head South 
For Five Pre-Season Games; 
Georgetown Fir^t Opponent 



Pharmacv Five 
Takes Title 



Pusey, Jackson, Morse 
Sparli Berkshire Win 



For the second straight year a 
group of Williams freshman and 
varsity basketball players donned 
the uniform of the College Phar- 
macy and went to Pittsfleld to win 
the Berkshire County amateur 
basketball crown. 

This year's team was coached 
by Williamstown High coach 
Mickey Smith. After coasting 
through their opener with an easy 
20 point victory they gained the 
semi-finals by crushing the Dal- 
ton Boys' Club by a 57-21 count 
and entered the finals after a 52- 
30 win over McConnell's Furni- 
ture in the semi-flnals. Besse- 
Clark of Pittsfleld. the other final- 
ist, fielded a very fine ballclub 
but Chuck Pusey's 15 points, Walt 
Morse's rebounding and Dave 




JOHHHY 



HEtPS CECIte ACHIEVE ALACRlty 
AND 06VIATE OeiOQUV 



I OONT CARE IP I DO FLUNKl.. 
PROFESSOR AAOEUER IS •TOO 
FUSSY FOR WORDS.. i^EJUSr 
DRIVES /MTWILD I 





Behind our playful plot, our intentions are serious: we want 
you to discover for yourstelf the welcome difference in 
cigarettes that phoip morris can bring you. 



Use These Words With Toiigue-ln-Cheek! 

(Plan to UM ONE avary wmIcI) 
CtRUaUS (>ir-bvr«t)-Tb« ihrM^itadKl watdi- 

deg of HadM. 
CIBAann HANOOVIK (Navor pro-neonco Itl 

DOHWwnco itl)— That atola •moktd.oiit latta, 

lliot tight dry faaling In your throat dua to 

•moiling. 
tCDYSIASTiC (ok-diz-oo-u-tllc) - a complata 

•Irlpptng-off of outar covaring. 
tKATO (orr.atM) — Mum of Joyoui Poatry. 
tMlOQUY («bb-l»4(wao)-Haapad-»p xom or 

obvto. , 

OaVIATI (•bb-voo-alo)— to go around or ovoid. 
KRIORINATINO (polMg^n-ay-tlng)- Roving 

abovt. 
niROOACm, (tMr-oh.4laic>till)-A prahinoric 

«vingad Bxard.^ 
flRMAOANT (torHliM|ant>— A nmty noggar. 
rrCOONISS (tyoJtMiMu) - A ^ Tlrad^uii- 

naaa-Wooian. ^ 
VIRAOO (vo«|v«w-ge) — A ihfow at cranky 



Established PROOF of that di£Ference is too extensive to be 
detailed here— but pre-medical and chemistry students, who 
will be especially interested can get it in published form 
FREE, by writing our Research Dept., Philip Morris Co., 
119 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 





Nine prospective candidates for this spring's varsity golf team, 
four of whom earned letters last year, head for the Southland 
next week for an arduous five match trip. The tpp-fllght opposition 
is provided by Georgetown, Virginia, North Carolina, and Haverford, 
while a tentative match with Yale at Pinehurst, North Carolina has 
been arranged. 

Many of the golfers made the Informal trip last year, which, 
as expected failed to produce a victory against the advanced playing 
of the Southern schools, but which was invaluable as an early con- 
ditioner for the regular season. Evidence of this fact is the '48 squad's 
fine record of eight wins,one loss (to Wesleyan) and one tie. 
Washington First Stop 

Opening against Georgetown April 4 on the Hoyas' links will be 
Captain Jerry Cole, Bucky Marchese, Chuck White, Jake Whitney, 
proud contributor of a hole in one on the last Southern trip, Doug 
Coleman, Ted Quinlan, Bill Burke, Bill Rodie and Berry Smith. 
The last two named were outstanding on the fairways last year as 
freshmen. Dick Heuer, college champ for the past two years, is unable 
to make the excursion. 

Accompanying the group are Coach Dick Baxter and faculty 
member Charlie Heuer, brother of Dick and a notable Eph golfer 
of a few years back. Besides Captain Cole, other letter winners from 
last spring are Marchese, White and Whitney. 
Considerable Travelling 

The second opponent as the linksmeu swing Southward at their 
own expense, offset by guarantees ottered by the Southern schools. 
Is the University of Virginia at Charlotiesville on Tuesday, April 5. 
On Wednesday, the University of North Ciuonna plays host at Chapel 
Hill. The next day the goiters hope to meet Yale at Finehurst, though 
the match is not yet definite. Haverford College near Philadelphia 
provides the final test on Saturday anu then the players leisurely 
return to Williamstown. 



Jackson's play-making gave the 
Pharmacy club a well-earned 49- 
46 triumph. 

High-scoring Williams center 
Pusey scored 58 points In the four 
ballgames. Including a 22 point 
splurge in the Dalton game. Soph- 
omores Dave Jackson and Walt 
Morse showed enough all around 
skill to indicate that they would 
be very much in the running lor 
slots on next year's varsity. 



uc 



comes at dinner-time, when the 
dorms are more easily cleared. 

Discipline Committee chairman 
Stuart Cool stated that there were 
three reasons for the ruling con- 
cerning fireworks: Are insurance 
would not cover accidents; Wil- 
liamstown law; Massachusetts 
law. Andrew Heineman discussed 
the recent appointment of the 
JA's presenting the standards by 
which they were picked. They 
were: the question of disciplinary 



and scholastic warnings, the ser- 
iousness toward the job If the 
men were chosen; marks and ex- 
tracurricular record; general dis- 
cussion. 

Martin Luthy presented a plan 
for consideration by the houses 
whereby a plaque would be a- 
warded to the winner of the Inter- 
Fraternity Sing. The cost to each 
house would be $2. The dales for 
next year's houseparties, Oct. 29, 
Feb. 26, May 8, were unanimously 
passed. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can get the uut- 
slauUiiii; news of the day every 
evening tiiruugh tile lull leased 
Wii-e Assuciated I^ress service in 

ibi}B (Lraufirri;it 

Norrh Adams, Moss. 

On sale at 5 p.m. on all 

Williamstown Newssfonds 




In Williai^town, your VAN HEU:>kN 
Shirts may be secured at 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1949 



"Variety" 



Schuman 



ent, with very little singing abil- 
ity. Is selected from the student 
body; the temme contingent from 
the wives of the students (OI's) 
and the local village. Bryant dis- 
plays a flair for inventive business 
and the handling of crowd move- 
ment. 

"Several of the embryo thesps 
come out with' standout perform- 
ances. This is particularly true 
of James Dissell in the part of 
Homer, showing a fine sense of 
timing and characterization. Ho- 
ward Erskine as Albert Rice dis- 
plays a professional versatility. 
Martin Luthy handles the satir- 
ized Mr. Cady with humor. Ted 
Farrow and Charles Hollerith are 
okay as secretaries." 



SAC 



he stated, "are not meeting ef- 
fectively th^ very real challenge 
of the West in the only way in 
which it can be met effectively— 
that Is, by striving toward the 
goals of personal liberty. Indivi- 
dual dignity, toleration of dissent, 
and procedural and substantive 
democracy. It is easier to engage 
In devll-chaslng, regimentation, 
intolerance, and Ideological fan- 
aticism; to heap coals of fire upon 
the heads of those who are labeled 
the agents- and lackeys of 'Ameri- 
can imperialism. . . " 

Alexander Fadeyev, spokesman 
for the Russian delegation, found 
Professor Schuman's remarks "as- 
tonishing." "There are no ele- 
ments in our country," he stated, 
"which desire war against the 
United States or any other coun- 
try." -' '--^ 



Poll... 




ruling on the books as of last 
year that no commercial ads 
would be accepted by the Adviser 
with the exception of the Taconic 
Theatre which will be served in 
the public interest. The recom- 
mendation was made because of 
the past omisslcm of publication 
on Mondays and Fridays and the 
indiscriminate cutting and omis- 
sion of ads." 

Second — That no advertise- 
ments or publicity notices of any 
type may be displayed outside of 
any campus building. "Though 
this does not apply to Spring 
Street merchants, this point is 
made to limit the posters which 
have appeared on trees and out- 
side of buildings," commented 
Motzer. 

Third — That there be a ten- 
day limit for all advertising, with 
the exception of class housepar- 
ties and Cap and Bells which may 
have a three week limit. All ad- 
vertising must be removed two 
days after the event publicized 
has taken place. "This would give 
equal publicity to all organiza- 
tions and insure the removal ol 
defunct advertising," continued 
Motzer. 

Fourth — That all signs and pos- 
ters have a maximum limit of 11 
xl3 inches. The date of the en- 
forcement of this recommenda- 
tion, if approved, is to be at the 
discretion of the SAC members. 
Motzer pointed out that this size 
is dictated by the bulletin board 
space requirements. The SAC 
committee deplored the habit of 
using bigger and better posters, 
since several of the organizations 
concerned are run on SAC grants. 

Fifth— That the committee ap- 
pointed to investigate news and 



publicity be given permanent sta- 
tus in the SAC. "By doing this," 
Motzer observed, "completion ol 
these recommendations will be 
insured and a defln^e lack of bp- 
ordlnation among campus adver- 
tising agencies will be corrected. 
This committee will work with 
the Purple Key in the creation 
and construction of a college 'bul- 
letin board." 

Members of the conmiittee in- 
clude Norman L. Olson, Jr. 'SO, 
representing the UC; Henry O 
Weaver Jr. '50, representing the 
IRC; Phillips B. VanDusen '50, 
representing the News Bureau; 
Edward O. Stack F-'51, represent- 
ing the Travel Bureau; and 
Chairman Motzer, representing 
WMS. 



Vincent Pull- 
er '62, Phi Oam- 
ma Delta "Theo- 
retically an en- 
rollment of 859 
would probably 
be -better since 
this would ena- 
ble you to know 
your classmates better] Still I 
can't see cutting down to 850 — 
after all, competition is greater 
when we have more fellows. There 
are more guys in every activity 
which makes the activities more 
lively. I suppose there are some 
crowded conditions under the pre- 
sent setup, but it's worth it. Prob- 
' ably some individuals would ^th- 
I er cut way down, but if this hap- 
pens, I think that the Club Would 
absorb most of the cut, aljthough 
the fraternities also ar^-^rowded 
in some cases." ^ 



JA 



The alternates are: Carl J. Aus- 
trian, Jr.; Joseph M. Calla h an, 
Jr.; Peter H. Debevolse, Robert 




John Mason '48, 
Alpha Delta Phi 
"Don't out the 
enrollment a t 
all! there are two 
reasons for this 
1- By increased 
education thro 
ughout the cou- 
ntry We can eliminate some of 
the bad welfare conditions. 3 - 
More fellows now want to go to 
college. They shouldn't be denied 
the chance. This Idea that what 
we do here at Williams doesn't 
make any difference else.where 
Is nonsense. Besides, by keeping 
enrollment at its preseht level, 
we'll be able to ge^ a wider dis- 
tribution of fellows which will 
spread our reputation. I don't 
think the added depreciation costs 
involved in our setup will be so 
great as to call for a decrease. 
Mora Williams sons will also be 
able to come here. It's about time 
we broke a few of the traditions 
around here regarding size. 



A. Klmbrough, m; John S. Lund, 
John W. MacNell, Walter H. 
Morse, Frank P. Relche, G. Predr 
erick Zeller, Jr. 



l«»»im^t^^^ti[^t^^^iL^^Tmt<^m^t^.i.t^L^t^ii.i.cgT; 



Northeastern University 

> SCHOOL o# LAW 

Admits Men and Women 

Day, Evening and Graduate Programs 

Regiatration — Sept. MS to 14, 1949 

Early application is necessary 

47 MT. VERNON STREET BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

T«lephon« KEnmor« 6-6800 



Exam ■ - • 



Friday, June 10, » ».m.: History 3 
- 1,2,4,6.7 Or.; History 3a - 6 Or.; 
History 4 - 8,11,13,16 H.; History 



Mathias 



become affiliated with recognised 
aeoounting firms and malu yearly 
audits of different companies, 
whUe in the latter they are con- 
cerned with the dally trajisaoUons 
of the industry which employs 
them. 

Starting salaries in a public 
accounting firm range from $2300 
to »3200 a year^wlth yearly In- 
creases amounting to about 1300 
for the first fpur years', Mathlas 
declared. A« a supervising accoun- 
tant, a man may mttke as much 
ai^ $13000 a year. Salaries of part- 
ners in the larger firms are often 
larger. 



16 - 0,7 H.; 1:80 pjn.i Biology i 
• 30 TBL.; Engllah 13 - 8 H; Qm! 
logy 4 - CI.; Phlloaophy 2 - i,}^ 
6,6,7 Or.; Physios 3a - i,io Tpi,' 
Pol, Scl. 16 - 11 H. 
Monday, June 18, a.m. and im 
p,m.: Major Examinations. 




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North Adami 

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Badges Rings Stains 

Jewelry Gifts Fovors 

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Telephone Waterford 644 



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Join our list of Regular 
Williams Customers at . . 

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ACOHl^ 



ENDS WEDNESDAY 

Technicolor Musical 

THE GREAT MR. HANDEL 

Feotura at 6:50- 8:4S 



THURSDAY „.^ 
Back by Spaclal Request 

THE INFORMER 

Faotura «» 7:05 - 9:00 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Edmund Gwenn 
Lassie 

HILLS OF HOME 

Fridoy at 6:45 - 8:40 
Saturday at 2:20, 6:45, 8:40 



-r 



"I like Chesterfield's 
MILDER, better taste. 
It's MY cigarette." 




STARRING IN 

"FLAMINGO ROAD 

A MICHAEL CURTIZ PRODUCTION 
RELEASED BY WARNER BROS. 




f i |j i(l>i i»» Imm « Mw T«Ma» Ca. 




3^^^0tjb^ 



SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1949 



Price 1 cents 



Death Of Robert Jolixiston 
Shocks College Community 



Fatal Auto Mishap 
Second This Year 



ce-^ 



Wyman, Dnypr, Hurt 

ArClar Hits Tree 

'•tM.Siy betore spring vaca- 
tion tiegaa, the College communi- 
ty was deeply shocked by the 
death of Robert W. Johnston In 
an automobile accident, Jhe sec- 
ond tragedy of Its kind during 
the college year. Johnston was 
killed early on the morning of 
April 1 when the car In which he 
was returning from Plttsfleld hit 
a tree on Cold Spring Road Just 
past the 1896 House. 

Donald Wyman, a sophomore, 
the driver of the car, escaped with 
minor facial and Internal Injuries. 
He was removed to the College 
infirmary and later to his home In 
Winchester, Mass., where he Is 
recovering at the present time. 
Johnston A Senior 

Robert Woodall Johnston was 
a member of the Class of '49. He- 
entered WlUams on November 5, 
1945, after graduating from the 
Forest Hills High School, Long 
Island. 

During his college career he 
was on the Dean's List for two 
semesters and was extremely ac- 
tive In varsity athletics. He play- 
ed on the basketball, baseball, and 
soccer teams, each for three years. 
He was a member of the Delta 
Kappa EpsUon Fraternity. 
President's Message 

President James P. Baxter, 3rd, 
stated: "On behalf of the Trus- 
tees and Indeed of the whole Wil- 
liams family, I wish to express 
deep sympathy to the parents of 
Robert Johnston '49, whose rec- 
ord at Williams as a student, an 
athlete, and a man had made us 
all proud of him. This terrible 
tragedy brought home to the 
whole community the terrible risks 
to themselves and to their guests 
run by those who drive at high 
speed. Sad at the loss of a senior 
of such promise. I hope that all 
of us who use the highways will 
liave a heightened sense that: 'In 
the midst of life we are In 
death;.. .' " 



PCABOOY, BIRMINGHAM 
HEAD 'PURPI^E COW 

The present EkUtorlal Board 
of the Purple Cow, campus hu- 
mor magftzlne, has aimounced 
the following ^[ipolntments to 
next year's Soard. Alexander 
Peabody '60 and Stephen Birm- 
ingham '50 will replace Steph- 
en .Sondheim and Russell 
Bourne as Co-Chairmen. E. 
Granger Ottley '61 will be man- 
aging Editor and Clayton 
Prltchett '50 will serve as Bus- 
iness Manager. 



Bureau Plans 
Job Interviews 



Seniors To Meet With 
Five Representatives 



During the coming week, five 
prominent representatives of bus- 
iness and Industry are scheduled 
to arrive at the Williams' Place- 
ment Bureau for employment in- 
terviews with members of the 
senior class. 

On Monday B. F. Llnlngston, 
Personnel Manager of the Mer- 
cantUe Stores Co. Inc., N. Y., N.Y., 
is seeking to recruit merchandis- 
ing trainees for a 6-13 month 
course In the New York ofBce as 
assistant buyer, etc. Mr. Llnlng- 
ston is prepared to offer $56 a 
week to start with merit Increas- 
es thereafter. 

RetaU Store Work 

From the Sears, Roebuck Com- 
pany of Boston, J. E. Brassil, Per- 
sonnel Representative, will Inter- 
view June graduates on Tuesday 
for retail store work rotating 
from Job to Job in his companies 
executive training program. The 
Joboftew 150" pier week for sin- 
gle men ($56 for married) plus 
company benefits. 

Wednesday Edward C. Nichols, 
Secretary of the Merrimack Mu- 
tual Fire Insurance Co., Andover, 
Mass., wishes to see seniors for 
training as special agents and 
fire underwriters. This Job pays 
♦2700 per year at the start. 
, On Thursday Supervisor of Bus- 
iness and Training, Robert J. 
Sm PLACESMBNT, Page 3 



Cast Set For 
'King's Men' 

New AMT Piay 
One Week Away 



Final rehearsals for "Ail The 
King's Men", the fifth Adams 
Memorial Theatre production of 
the season, will take place dur- 
ing the coming week in prepara- 
tion for performances of the play 
on Friday and Saturday, Apr^l 23 
and 24. 

Oovemor Willie Stark, the lead 
character of Robert Penn War- 
ren's play about the fall of the 
ruthless governor, will be por- 
trayed by Edward K. Stack F-'51. 
A part of equal dramatic impor- 
tance, that of Doctor Adam Stan- 
ton, is in the hands of Gilbert Ma- 
son '51. 

Feminine Leads 
The feminine leads of Anne 
Stanton, the doctor's sister, and 
Lucy Stark, the Governor's di- 
vorced wife will be portrayed by 
portrayed by Mariam Rouse and 
Frances Chaffee, respectively. Ca- 
thy Munger had been cast in the 
supporting role of Sadie Burk, the 
Governor's Confidential secretary 

E. Robert Hellawell '50 will be 
Doctor Shipworth, closest friend 
of Doctor Stanton. The comic role 
of Tiny Duffy will be handled by 
Edward T. Gushee, Jr. '50. Thomas 
Brlttmgham m '51 will portray 
the big, strapping, motorcycle cop 
Al Suggs. 

Other Boles 

Two scheming politicians, Benet 
Plllsbury and TaiUifero Meeks, 
are to be characterized by John 
Anderson '60 and Ralph Horween, 
Jr. '60. Adam Stovall ni '60 will 
handle the part of Doctor Palr- 
banlcs. 

Other supporting roles will be 

played by Albert McLean, Jr.'Sl, 

Ernest I^hmann '51, Howard Er- 

skine '49, Josephine Miser, Starr 

See AMT, Page 4 



L'C Discusses 
New Rules 
About Cars 



New Rushing Regulations 

Proposed For 1949; 

To Decide Monday 

Dlseussloli'^'iiie proposed rules 
which will Implement the exis- 
ting regulations concerning the 
owning and operating of auto- 
mobiles at Williams was the main 
topic of business at the UC meet- 
ing last Monday night. The rules 
will be voted on at the next meet- 
ing. 

The rules have been drawn up 
along the lines of the conduct 
rules, which were passed last fall 
when the curfew was lifted. They 
consist of three articles, and place 
the responsibility first on the in- 
dividual and then on the house 
presidents and the houses them- 
selves. 

Three Articles 

The first article states that any 
freshman or sophomore owning 
or operating a car illegally will 
be liable to one year's suspension. 
The second article lists the house 
president's duty, provided he 
knows that a car is being illegally 
owned or operated. He notifies 
the car ownef to remove his car 
from Williamstown within a week 
and reports to the Discipline 
Committee about the car and a- 
bout the notification. 

At the end of the week the Dis- 
cipline Committee Inquires into 
the whereabouts of the car. If 
the owner has removed his car, 
no action will be taken. If the car 
is still present, the student shall 
be suspended for a year. 

Responsibility on Individual 

tJnder the third article, if the 
Discipline Committee finds out 
about an illegal car through 
sources other than the house pre- 
sident, it shall inquire of the 
house presitfcnt whether he knew 
about the car. If he did not, there 
will t>e no penalty for the house, 
but a year's suspension for the 
See UC, Page 2 



Lacrossmen Win Two 
OnRigorous SpringTrip 



Seniors Face 
Major Exams 

Comprehensive Tests 

To Last Five Hours 



Beginning this spring, all Wil- 
liams seniors will be required to 
take the major comprehensive ex- 
aminations, covering the work of 
the major sequence. These exams, 
given two days after the close 'of 
regular final tests, were a regular 
part of the curriculum before the 
war, but were discontinued in 
1943. 

The major exams will last one 
day this spring, for approximately 
five hours, and will cover the work 
of the major sequence and the 
(a) parallel course. Beginning 
with the Class of 1950, the exams 
will be two-day affairs and will 
include the (b) parallel course and 
the correlation courses. 
The Purpose 

The major examination is in- 
tended to "bring out the student's 
ability to coordinate, the different 
parts of the major, including the 
correlation course." Much of the 
preparation for the exam will be 
covered in connection with in- 
struction in the major sequence 
courses, particularly the flnal re- 
quired course of the sequence. 

To complete a major — and 
graduate — the student must get 
a grade of "C" or l)etter in the 
"major", for which the grade is 
compiled from the grades acquired 
in the major courses and the com- 
prehensive exam, which counts 
about one-third of the major 
grade. 

The student must secure passing 
grades In all of the major courses 
and in the major exam, but the 
latter may in special cases be re- 
taken after a delay of one year if 
the student fails it the first time. 



ROTC APPLICATION 
DEADLINE ON TUESDAY 

Application for admission to 
Air ROTC courses must be 
made from 1-4 pjn., Tuesday, 
April 19, at the ROTC office, 
since applications submitted 
after this date will not be con- 
sidered. 

Veterans with one year of 
service are eligible for the Ad- 
vanced Course. Students who 
have received previous accre- 
dited ROTC training may en- 
roll and will receive credit for 
their previous work. 

Students whose participation 
in the Air ROTC has been de- 
ferred Tmtil their Sophomore 
year are requested to report at 
this date. 

Members of the Class of '52 
are ineligible unless they are 
veterans or have had previous 
ROTC training. 

This notice does not apply to 
those already enrolled in the 
ROTC. 



Local Firemen 
Jo Hold Bali 



Chief Welch Kecollects 

First Dance In 1897 



Hopkins' Entry- 
Captures First 

Hig ''dpug 16" Winner 
In Art Competition 



national College Bennington, 
pretatlons of the 19th century. 
In view of the fact that Wil- 
liams has no accredited course in 
art instruction, Hopkins' award 
in the face of competition from 
such colleges as American Inter- 
Goddard, and Wesleyan, all of 
which give credit for courses of 
art instruction, was a double tri- 
umph. Included among the other 
colleges in this western New Eng- 
See "OPUS 16". Page 4 



8050 Wily Irout In Local 
Streams Challenge Skill Of 
Anglers As Season Opens 



In a ceremony held April 3 at 
Springfield John H. Hopklns,'60, 
was awarded the $26.00 first prize 
in the oil painting division of the 
Fifth Annual College Art Com- 
petition and Exhibition, held at 
the Springfield Museum of Fine 
Arts. His prize winning entry, 
"Opus 16", is a landscape in oil 
siiifllar - W "the^onumHc inter:;!**'*'^; ""^ ^ ^^..^ propftgsi- 



by Dick Duffleld 

Somewhere in the rivers, streams 
and brooks o wWlUiamstown there 
are 8060 trout of various sizes and 
assortments waiting schmoo-like 
to^ make some fisherman happy. 
Already the disciples of Izaac 
Walton have hauled their gear 
from storage and the more fanatic 
ones have had a chance to try 
their luck since the season open- 
ed one hour l>efore sunrise yes- 
terday. 

In Williamstown there exists to- 
day, and has for some years back, 
a group of amateur sportsmen 
known as the Williamstown Fish 
and Game sissoclatlon, now un- 
der the presidency of Bernard 
Wisher, devoted to the conserva- 
tion of the fish and wildlife 'in 
the vicinity. 

Fox Hunts 
With the opening of the fishing 
season most of Its 250 meml>ers 
will be found Indulging In their 
favorite pastime along the bsmks 
and islands of the neighboring 
streams. During the greater part 
of the year, however, much of 



ing the game and fish population 
In the area. 

Among their conservation act- 
ivities is the planting of finger- 
ling trout in the fall, which they 
do with the federal government's 
assistance. They also place barbed 
wire around quick-sand holes to 
protect livestock and sportsmen, 
cut and pile brush for rabbits' and 
pheasants' shelters, and carry on 
hunts to rid the countryside of the 
game-destroying wild fox. 



Fly Fishing 

For the benefit of the local Nim- 
rods the association operates at 
cost a trap-shooting range in Ver- 
mont. At present the Association 
is concentrating on promoting an 
interest in the outdoors among 
the younger folks. One of the 
events planned along this line is 
a trout fishing derby to be held 
soon for children under 16. 

According to the members of 
the association, who invite any 
interested college men to Join, the 
Green River is the best local spot 
for fishing. The most desirable 
spot for fly-fishing in the neigh- 
boring area is on the Deerfleld 
River l}etween the Charlemont 
Village bridge and the Vermont 
State line, the entire, length of 
which Is restricted tb artificial 
baits. 

Sage Advice 

Anyone fishing on the Deerfleld 
River should beware the sudden 
rise of the river when the dams 
upstream are released. When this 
occurs, the water level may rise as 
much as three feet, at a foot an 
hiiiuir.I^t~ftaT"6he hapless hunter 
was stranded on a rapidly disap- 
pearing islGind, not to be rescued 
until 24 hours later. 

No angler need worry aliout 
catching his limit, however, if he 
follows the advice of George Wiles, 
secretary-treasurer of the associa- 
tion. Atbording to that veteran 
fisherman, all that anyone must 
do is to "find a trout that's him- 
gry and put what he wants K 
front of him". 



by Hank Baker 

Chief Thomas Welch grinned 
as he recalled the first Variety Ball 
of the Williamstown Fire Depart- 
ment in 1897. 

"We danced different then... 
it was real dancing, " continued 
Chief Welch. "The Money Musk, 
the Portland Fancy, the Virginia 
Reel, quadrilles, and squares were 
most popular with a few waltzes 
and two-steps thrown in. In those 
days the caller was the boss on the 
floor. You didn't dance^a step un- 
til he told you, or he'd tell you to 
get off the floor. ..and you got. 
People danced t6 the music, the 
way they don't do it any more 
52nd Annual Variety Ball 

The Chief was looking forward 
to the Fireman's 52nd Annual 
Variety Ball on Monday night in 
the Lasell G^, although he re- 
marked that it seemed a little 
more like work to him these days. 
Sammy Vincent's Orthestra will 
play in the large floor with Bill 
Barnes and his Polka Dot Squares 
playing for square dancing with 
"Pop" Smith calling in the wrest- 
ling room from 9 to 1. Tickets 
may be obtained from department 
See FERE, Page 4 



Union In 1 own 
For Afternoon 
Opener Today 

Ephs Topple Del.aware, 
Loyola In Five-Game 
Tour Through South 



Frosh Hear 
Science Talk 



Crawford, Curry Stress 
Physics, Chemistry 

Professors Franzo H. Craw- 
ford of the Physics Department 
and James R. Curry of the Chem- 
istry Department stressed the 
Importance of their fields at a 
freshman orientation meeting in 
Jesup Hall on Tuesday, April 12. 
■ Professor Curry spoke on "How 
the place of science and scien- 
tists has cnanKed' IB relation to 
Economics and Political Science." 
Briefly tracing the development of 
scientific contribution' to our so- 
ciety from Lavoisier to the recent 
atomic discoveries, he posed the 
problem of how science is going 
to meet its obligations to (irovlde 
continued conservation and sub- 
stitution of resources. 

Professor Crawford grouped the 
various fields of science under 
Ave main headings: Primary 
iSee FROj^H, Page 3 



Tangling with some of the best 
teams in the country, the Williams 
lacrosse team returned from its 
spring trip with a creditable re- 
cord of two wins and three losses. 
Navy, Maryland, and Duke over- 
powered the Purple with a dazzl- 
ing display of stickwork, but the 
Ephs beat Loyola and Delaware. 

On Monday the Williams ten 
opened against Navy, and showed 
an unusual brand of ball for the 
first game. Baffled i)y a Purple 
zone defense, the Midshipmen 
could only build up a 5-2 lead by 
half-time. But conditioning and 
fast cutting in front of the goal 
solved the zone in the second half. 
The flnal score was 14-3 tor Navy. 
Bobby Day, Ed Maynard, and 
Dave Van Alstyne scored. 
Maryland Excels 

Meeting Maryland at College 
Park on Tuesday, the Ephs played 
their best game of the trip, but 
found the stickwork and speed of 
the Terps to be far out of .their 
class. An experienced Maryland 
ten rolled up ii 12-4 decision. 

As in the Navy game, the 
Terps scored several of their 
goals with Williams a man short 
because of a penalty. 

Attackmen Maynard scored 
two of the Purple goals, and the 
other attackmen, Gordy McWil- 
liams and Pat Graney each tallied 
once. 

Purple Nips Loyola 

At last playing a team in their 
own class, the Ephs tripped loyola 
of Baltimore, 4-3. After spotting 
the home team two goals within 
the flrst four minutes, the Purple 
steadied down to cqnsistant la- 
crosse. Ronnie Chute netted a 
long shot midway in the second 
quarter 

Late in the third period, Graney 
rescued a loose ball from a scuffle 
and fired a long shot to knot the 
count at 2-2. McWilhams' goal, 
on a pass from Graney, was bal- 
anced by a score by Hughes of 
Loyola. At 4:12 of the final period 
Coke Scofleld took a feed from 
Graney behind the cage and flip- 
ped the ball by the goalie for the" 
winning tally. 

Ephs Drub Delaware 

With the midflelds scrambled 
because of injuries and Illness, 
Williams was unable to run up 
more than a 4-0 lead at half- 
time against an undermanned 
Delaware squad. The highlight of 
the action was a pretty blonde 
slowly wending her way through 
The Wiliams defense. Mcwilliams 
See LACROSSE, Page 4 



Kaps Win First 
Round Of Sing 

Psi U, Deke, Sig Phi 
Meet Monday Night 



last Monday evening In the 
Studio Theater in the Dlisement of 
the A^IT, the Kappa Alpha octet 
came off the victors In the first 
round of the Interfratemlty Sing 
Contest. They were opposed by the 
Theta Delta Chi and Phi Sigma 
Kappa teams. The members of the 
wiiming octet are Edward Chas- 
teney, '52, and Jacob Noltfe. '60, 
first tenors; James Walker, '49, 
and Peter Thurber, '60 second te- 
nors; Rlchtuxl Proctor, '60, and' 
See KAPS, Pace 4 




THE WILLIAMS RECORP SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1949 



f tr« 10mi||tt§ 3ae^xr4 



North Adams, Mossachusetts 



Williomstown, AAossochusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1 944, at the post office at 
North Adorns, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williomstown, Telephone 72. 



Volume XLIII 



April 16, 1949 



Number 9 



Rushing Change 

The Undergraduate Council Rushing Committee's plan to abolish 
prowling and give every entering freshman a first period bid to all 
.sixteen social units will come before the UC for final approval Mon- 
day evening. If it is passed, it will be a big step forward toward 
fraternity fairness: if not, the decision will be accompanied by 
misgivings on tlie part of many students and alumni sincerely 
interested in the improvement of the Williams fraternity system. 

In order to see the entire freshman class in the first period, 
the proposed plan would extend the length of that period by one 
day. from four to five, tout it will, by the elimination of prowling, 
cut down by a day the overall rushing time. This would make twenty 
periods, instead of the usual sixteen, and necessitate each houses' 
accommodating 12 to 13 rushees per period. - xBC^ 

Prowling has long been condemned as an unsatisfactory way to 
introduce freshmen to Williams and Williams fraternities. For va- 
rious reasons, the houses must axe. on the say-so of one or two 
prowlers, a large' number of the incoming freshmen. Because of a 
limited number of rooms in which to rush or confidence that they 
can draw a large number of second bid acceptances, some houses 
eliminate as many as one-third of the incoming class during prowling. 

Needless to say. as well as the houses losing out, many freshmen 
never get an even break. And when the raw deal comes the second or 
third day a freshman is here at college, it can be pretty tough to take. 
The men from the better known prep schools already have friends 
at Williams, so they usually make the rounds of a number of houses. 
But the high school student who comes up here cold is liable to be 
left out in the cold the rest of his college career. This change would 
not only get all freshmen off to a good start and give, them a better 
attitude toward the rushing system, it would also be a big help to 
the admissions office in their job of attracting the best men to 
Williams. 

In the past, many prospective students, high school grads in 
particular, have turned Williams down solely because of the difficulty 
of breaking into a fraternity society, of even getting first bids, under 
conditions where previous friendships and connections are so im- 
portant. Giving every man a first bid to every house would do much 
to remedy this situation. It would guarantee that no freshman, be- 
cause his personality and interests differ from the prowlers', or 
because he didn't "prep in the East" and make friends there, gets 
left at the post when the first bids are handed out. All the fresh- 
men would be off to an even start. 

The plan would add another day to the already overly long 
and grueling grind of rushing, sure, but that's the price we have 
to pay for a fair fraternity system. If we aren't willing to work for 
the Williams system, we don't deserve to reap its manifold benefits. 



Letters To The Editor 



To the Editor of the Williams RECORD: 

I don't know exactly where this information can find a resting- 
place in the Williams REGARD but I feel its importance should be 
recognized. 

I happened acro.ss a New York State Department of Sanitation 
letter over vacation which concerned tire danger of fiuorescent lights, 
and since they are in college cla.s.srooms and dormitory rooms, and 
since all of us come in contact with them on the outside too. I feel the 
warning in said letter might save someone serious bodily harm or 
even death. 

Each tube of a fluorescent light contains a gas compound which 
is poisonous, so if one breaks, remember these "don'ts": 

1. Don't breath the air about broken tubes. If one breaks, open a 
window and get as far away from the tube as possible. 

2. Don't pick up the pieces in your hand, for if cut by the 
glass of the tube, there's a good chance you won't be around to enjoy 
the u.se of the replacement tube. 

3 All in all. just don't fool with any smashed fiuorescent lighting 
and .see that others don't. You and everyone el.se will be heftlthier 
for it. 

There's not much to it. but such information might just keep 
one of us around a little longer. 

April 13. 1949 Williams Gehron '50 



Hitting The Fheks 

MISS TATLOCK'S MILLIONS (tonight) Comedy from the pen of 
Charles Brackett Is pretty apt to be not only funny but risky, and this 
picture Is no exception. The touchy subjecta include mental de- 
rangement, sympathetic swindling and the merest suggestion of In- 
cest, but Brackett managed to get it all nicely smoothed over with 
some humorous situations and equally comic lines. Wanda Hendrlx 
seems to be infatuated with brother John Lund, who has the un- 
compromising part of a moron, and Bairy Fitzgerald, always good, 
is Lund's guiding light in lunacy as well, as chicanery. Monty Wooley 
is in there too, but for just what reason, no one knows. 
EVERY GIRL SHOULD BE MARRIED (Sun-MonI Poker-faced 
Gary Grant gets another chance to underplay a supposedly comic 
roll, and is as successful as usual at it. In this opus, we find a shop- 
girl engaged in finding a husband, and it is easy to see why this is 
such a tough job, but much harder to understand why Cary finally 
succumbs to her inducements. This much we must grant him, Betsy 
Drake has to go through all sorts of pre-marital contortions before 
he is finally hooked, and twe are meant to believe) this is much to 
the dismay of assorted second-fiddlers Franchot Tone and Eddie 
Albert. Tone is the boss with whom Miss Drake flirts, Albert the 
home-town lothario, and as a baby-specialist. Grant is, of course, 
the. Inevitable objective of all the shenanigans.. 

THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LI'VES (Tues-Wed) This is a picture 
needing no introduction for it won almost every conceivable award 
several years back, and if you didn't see it then, now is the time. 
Long, it will only be shown once a day at 8 pm, and runs almost 
three hours. In it, for those of you who won't remember, are Myrna 
Loy, Frederick March. Teresa Wright, and a one-armed gent, who 
never having acted before, walked off with all kinds of honors. March 
turns in his usual superior peiformance, and inspires Miss Loy, who 
was fresh from the Thin Man series, to do likewise. Except for a 
wet monient at the end, this is an exceptionally fine handling of a 
tough subject, the readjustment of veterans. 

MURDERERS AMONG US (Thurs) Despite the handicap of a rather 
trite script, this picture turned out pretty well. It brings to the 
American screen Germany's latest contribution to culture, one Hil 
degard Knef who fills aging Marlene Dietrich's stockings amply. 
The acting in this picture lives up to the standard set by the Italian 
moviemakers, but while there are good parts to it, and it is certainly 
as brutal, it lacks the humane touch which makes pictures like 
SHOESHINE unforgettable. In German, with English subtitles. 
THREE GODFATHERS (PYi-Sat) Never underestimate the power of 
a baby seems to Be the gospel preached by this latest of technicolored 
westerns. We see a startling transformation in John Wayne, tough 
guy turned Milquetoast, who is the principal foil for said infant. 
And would you believe It? John gets the banker's daughter to wait 
for him while he does a short stretch for his misdemeanors. Harry 
Carey Jr. and Pedro Armendariz, the other two of the terrible 
threesome are spared most of the sloppy switch since they are written 
out about the time John begins to find great meaning in things like 
Death and Childbirth on the prairie, but then, they never get to kiss 
the female lead either. John Ford, who has directed some good ones, 
might well have turned this Into a slick satire, but .somewhere along 
the line, his guns got plugged. 




News Briefs 





WMS Weekly Schedule 




Monday thru Friday 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


5:00-6 


:15 Afternoon Roundup 


9:30 


Show Time 


T 


Monday 


10:00 


Gilbert & Sullivan 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


10:30 


Verney Varieties 


9:00 


News 


11:00 


gSO Club 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


11:30- 


12:00 Music till Midnight 


9:30 


Songs by Schauffler 




Thursday 


9:45 


McCombe at the Piano 


7:30 


Faculty Talks 


10:00 


Campus Hit Parade 


7:45 


Concert Hall 


10:30 


Interfratemity Sing 




News 


11:00- 


12:00 Music till Midnight 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 




Tuesday 


9:30 


Plumb's Bop Shop 


7:30 


Concert .Hall 


10:00 


Ferguson Jazz Show 


9:00 


News 


10:30 


Coffee Time at Mike's 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


11:00- 


12:00 Music till Midnight 


9:30 


Kellogg & Stelnbrenner 




Friday 


9:45 


Evans & Park 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


10:00 


Dramatic Workshop 


9:00 


News 


10:30 


Great Expectations 


9:15 


Band of the Nite 


11:00- 


12:00 Music till Midnight 


9:30 


Old Chuck Wagon 




Wednesday 


10:00 


Mostly for Dreaming 


7:30 


Concert Hall 


11:00- 


12:00 Musft till Midnight 


9:00 


News , 




Saturday 




J 


5:15-6 


:15 Open House at the Inn 



Placement 



The rhompson Concert Committee will present Martial Singhcr. 
noted Metropolitan Opera baritone, on Monday night. April 18, at 
8:15 p.m.. in Chapin Hall. 

The woe will sponsor a six-ctllegc square dance In the gym 
next Saturday night. Marty Lamphier will call the squares for the 
men and women from Holyoke, Smith, Amherst. Mass State. Spring- 
field and Williams. Admission is 60^ a head. 



UC-- 



owner. If the president did know 
no one in the hou.se will be allow- 
ed to own or operate a car for a 
term, and the owner will be .sus- 
pended for a year. Continued 
owning- and operating of cars 
would then result In a year of so- 
cial probation. 

John Griggs, chairman of the 
Rushing Committee, proposed 
that prowling be eliminated next 
fall, and that another night be 
added to the first period of rush- 
ing so that all freshmen can visit 
all houses. Such a plan would gua- 
rantee that all houses meet all 
freshmen. It would be fairer to 
the freshmen and would streng- 
then the position of fraternities 
at Williams. 

The Council elected three mem- 



bers from the undergraduate body 
to each of three committees. The 
following were elected to the 
Schola.stic Committee: Rus.sell 
Bourne '50. Duncan McDonald'50, 
and Peter Thurber '50; to the En- 
tertainment Committee: Martin 
Detmer '50, Lawrence Pitch, Jr. 
'50, and Clifton 'Sfrowers, Jr. '50; 
to the Rushing Committee: Wil- 
liam Leitzinger '50, Charles Schaaf 
'50. and Norman Wood '50. 



Frosh 



Canning of the General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, is look- 
ing for those Interested in enter- 
ing a busines,s training course for 
accounting, financial and admin- 
istrative management. Mr. Can- 
ning's organization pays $227 
monthly with $250 in six months. 
Recruiting trainees for group, 
claim, examining and life insur- 
ance underwriting _ departments 
on Friday, S. J. Lukens. Person- 
nel Manager for the Paul Revere 



Life Insurance Co. of Worcester 
Mass., offers to those between 21 
and 30 year^ of age $50 a week 
at the S'tart for participation In a 
2-3 yeai tiaining piogram 



UNDERGRADUATES APPRECIATE 

THE GENERALLY LOWER PRICES IN 

BROOKS BROTHERS' SIXTH FLOOR SHOP 

Ciilk-yc men aic amoMii Uniiiks Hmtliers' most 
enthusiastic fans. Tlicy're especially partial to 
(iiir Si.\tli l''lo(ir Sluip, which yivcs thciii typi- 
cal Urcioks brothers' quality at gejierally lower 
prices. We have wide selections assembled there 
... all riHectiMi; the Quality :in(i CIooil 'I'aste for 
which lirooks Urcjtliers are famous. 

■ STAILISHID !•>• 








mi9hing;9, 



Ufi M.ADISON- .-WKNUK, COR. 44l'll .S'l'.. NKW YORK 17, N. y. 
+6 NKVVIiURV, COR. Ill' RKKI.i:^' .SIRKKT. HOSI'ON 10, M.ASS. 

i.os A.\'('.i:i.i:s • s,\N I R.wcisco 



<^'jear ci^o^ •yxritjeent^oir^t^^ v^£er (-..^a^e^aB^eL-as^ ..'^os^ 



RELIABLE SERVICE 

Join our list of Regular 
Williams Customen at . . 

KRONICK'S 
Esso Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 




f„A,04 Tarn VM ^ 



UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CO, 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 




Courteous, efficient 

end prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adams 



An Amazing Offer by 

HOLIDAY 

^ip9 MIxfvn 

TTm pipt ihal cYtry unokcr wsoo-DANA, die 
modern pipe, with bcightir poUihed alumi 
num>hioliind |«iiii|n« l«i p«rt.J h,!.. fcljj 

w 




with inside wrsppers 
from 12 pocket tins a< 

MiiDiir Pin miTiiE 




tm D MUUT mum 
OM rov DANA nn 

Sndit 

•MMr,isfin,iirtMK,niikii 

Orrw UMttod to UBA-bnirM 



Sciences, Secondary Sciences, So- 
cial Sciences, Art and Literature, 
and Philosophy. Explaining the 
interrelation of these studies, he 
demonstrated that while this is 
not universally a scientific age, 
science does play a major part In 
our lives. 




SHOES 
CAN BE 
KEPT NEW 
THROUGH REPAIR 



TRY 



LUPO'S 

for 
SHOE REPAIRING 

ALWAYS READY TO 

SERVE WILLIAMS MEN 

WITH 24 HOUR SERVICE 




BKAUSE THEY PREPARED FOR 
SMOOTH VACATION DRIVINO WITH OUR 

Vaeathn Special 

• adjust- brakes 

• adjust clutch 

• check steering 

• tune engine 

• inspect electrical 

system 

• lubrication 

• inspect tires 




HERBERT A. ORR CO. 

Curran Highway 
Nofth Adonn, Most. 



ACRE 

Dairy 



FARM 
Bar 



\ state Road 

I 

' Between Williamatown an< 



North Adams 



Lunches - Ice Cream 
Sandwiches 



J. Paul Sheedy* Switched lo Wildrool Cream-Oil 
Beb9U8e He Flunked The Finger-Nail Tesl 




POOR old Sheedy Iwd ■ liang dog loolc before he tried tiie' 
Finger-Nail Test and switciied to Wildroot Cream-Oil. 
Today — lie's a blue ribbon winner. Regular use of Wildroot 
Cream-QU now gives him a snappy, well-groomed look. No 
longer it he bothered by dryness and loose, ugly dandruff. 
He's out of the dog house for good with his girl friends. Why 
not dog trot down to your nearest drug store for a bottle or 
tube of non-alcoholic Wildroot Cream-Oil right now I And ask 
your barber for professional applications. You'll find that once 
you start using Wildroot Cream-Oil containing Lanolin, you're 
a gay dog In even the beat society. , ^ 
♦ of 527 Bumugbt Dr., Snyder, NY. 
Wildroot Coffipui)r, loc.'fiua'ilo II, N. Y. 




^ 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1949 



Golf Team Drubs Haverford^ 
Drops Matches Jo Virginia^ 
]\orth Carolina^ Georgetown 



By Kev Delany 

An Invaluable week of practice 
and competition against top- 
fUsht golf teams was the result 
of the annual Southern trip made 
during spring vacation by nine 
prospective candidates for the 
Williams varsity. Although only 
one victory was registered out of 
four attempts, the fine condition- 
ng provided gives the duffers a 
jump on the majority of regular 
settson opposition, which com- 
mences with Hofstra on April 23. 

On Monday, April 4, the golfers 
encountered Georgetown and 
though they came out on the short 
end, 6Vi-2Vi, Bucky Marchese, 
playing number one, shot a 76, low 
foi- the day. Then Bucky and Ber- 
ry Smith teamed up and won best 
ball In the number one foursome 
for another Eph point. Chuck 
White, number three man, halfed 
Uie eighteen holes with his Hoya 
opponent to gain the final half 
point. 

Marchese Battles Ward 

In a steady downpour at Char- 
lottesville, the travellers as ex- 
pected were topped by the Unlver- 
.sity of Virginia, ISVi-S'/i. Bill 
Burke, in the number seven slot, 
wiis the Purple standout as he 
tallied two and a half points un- 
der the Nassau scoring system, 
ml.s.sing a sweep by halflni,' one 
nine. Others who came through 
were Berry Smith and Bill Rodic. 
both halflng their matches. 

Kim Whitney carded a low 74 
as he took two and a lialf points 
in the lo,ss to North Carolina, 
2'2Vi-iVi. A notable performance 
was turned In by Marchese as he 
won a point from Harvey Ward, 



Piatt Refuses Offer; 
Position Stiil Open 

Joe Piatt, offered the Job of 
varsity basketball coach at 
Williams last month, will not 
accept the position, due to pre- 
vious committments at Carle- 
ton College In Northfleld, 
Minn., Athletic Director John 
C, Jay announced this week. 

Piatt Is head basketball and 
baseball coach at Carleton. Se- 
veral Other candidates pow are 
being considered for the posi- 
tion, but no definite appoint- 
ment is expected for several 
weeks. 



Purple Netmen Downed By Powerful 
Southern Teams On Spring Trip; 
Face Princeton Today In Opener 

The Purple netmen tangled with some of the most formidable 

tennis powers in the East during Spring vacation and failed to win 

any of their five matches, although they gained valuable experience 

and showed promise. "The boys played well," said Coach Chaffee, 

and got their shots going. We didn't expect to win." 

Captain Charlie Schaaf, in the 



former North-South amateur 
champ, by defeating him for one 
nine. Captain Jerry Cole and 
Marchese took the final point by 
copping best bail for nine holes. 
Proof of the experienced Tarheel's 
caliber were .scores of one 69 and 
two 70s by their linksmen. 

Ilaverford Swamped 

Two good days of practice at 
Pinehurst, North Carolina were 
gotten in by the squad before tliey 
drove Nortli to Philadelphia and 
the concluding match on Satur- 
day. Haverford College afforded 
weak opposition and the fast im- 
proving Ephmen won by a perfect 
9-0 count. Bill Rodie, at number 
one, carded 74 for the match low. 
Among the other winners were 
Ted Quinlan and Doug Coleman 
who .scored their initial point*. 



^O- 



number three spot, was the only 
one of the regular first seven 
singles players to amass a win- 
ning record; he won three mat- 
ches while losing two. Tom Kent, 
at number eight took three mat- 
ches while dropping only one. 
Doubles Weak 

Boubles play was weak; even 
the New England championship 
pair of Schaaf and Fred Scribner 
looked good only against Duke. I ers 
Coach Chaffee shifted his other 
players around continually in an 
unsuccessful attempt to find 
.smooth combinations. 

Playing outdoors for the first 
time in 1949, the Ephmen encoun- 
tered Navy on April 4 and suc- 
cumbed 3'/2-2'/2. I The short score 
resulted from the Middies having 
to go to supper.) Stu Robinson 
was impressive as he trounced 
Navy's number one player 6-3,6-0. 
North Carolina 

North Carolina's powerhouse 
vanquished the Purple 12-2 as 
Kent was the only singles player 
to escape defeat. Kent also teamed 



with John Prankenheimer in the 
number five doubles spot to gain 
the only other triumph. 

Williams roared back In a re- 
matctf the next day however to 
give North Carolina's revised line 
up a scare before bowing 8-7. Most 
of the Eph victories came in the 
extra matches, hojvever; only 
Schaaf and Pete Thurber won a- 
mong the regular first seven play- 



Purple Nine Gains Experience, 
No Wins On "Southern" Trip 



Eph Sailors 
Place Third 



Owen's Hitting, Play 

Of Sophs, Shine 



Qualify For N. England 
Title At New London 



FOR SALE 

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1948 (new) Town & Country 

Convert. Coupe. Price Right 
1947 Chrysler Windsor Sedan 
1941 Buick Model 56 Coupe 
1941 Buicit Model 71 Sedon 
1939 Ford Sedon 

Luno's Buick Co. 

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Tel. 537-M 



Bow to Duke 

Duke's sophomore-laden team 
smacked the visitors 9-4 on April 
6. Robinson, Schaaf, and Kent 
took singles victories, while Scrib- 
ner and Schaaf were triumphant 
in the number one doubles spot. 
Chaffee's men fell to the Univer- 
sity of 'Virginia -by a lopsided 13- 
2 score which fails t9,reveal that 
the Ephmen lost six extra set mat- 
ches. Doubles play was erratic, 
as usual, while the singles placers 
lacked drive on the important 
points. 

Opening their regular season 
today at Princeton, the netmen 
face a team which .shellacked 
them 8-1 last year. Possibly as a 
result of their recent vacation, the 
Tigers' number two and three men 
are on the inactive list due to a 
nei'vous breakdown and a bad 
heart, but their ace Gaines heads 
an experienced group against 
which Williams will have little 
chance. With doubles teams as 
yet undecided, the Purple lineup 
is as follows: Robinson, Scribner, 
Schaaf, Palmer, Thurber, Taka- 
mine, and Treman. 



J/l^^// a/l^ 



JOMMMV 



LIFTS LARRyiO OLY/WPIAN 
•DELIGHTS WITH A ClNEAWTIC HOURl/ 



COME 0N,LARR1(.' VOU HAVE TO BE 
PHOTOGI?APHED. VOU'RE PICKED TO 
ESCORT DOLLY DARE, THE HOLLY- 
WOOD HETAIRAOUR CHOSEN 
PROM-QUEEN 






SMOKING AND STUDYING SO 
HARD HAVE LEFT ME 
PeOICULOUS. I HAVENT THE 

vfiueiry to ogle the 

QUEEN OF SHEBA 




Placing third out of seven col- 
leges participating in the Con- 
necticut Valley Championship at 
Coast Guard last weekend, the 
Williams sailors qualified for the 
New England Championships on 
May 7th also to be held at New 
London. Another Williams crew 
placed fourth at Tufts on the 
same weekend. 

Participating at Coast Guard 
besides Williams were Dartmouth, 
Wesleyan, Amherst, Trinity, Coast 
Guard, and Yale. The last two 
mentioned are top teams in the 
East if not in the whole country. 
The meet was sailed in Interna- 
tional 12-foot dinghies on the 
Connecticut River. 

Williams, Dartmouth Close 

The Williams team consisted of 
Commodore Oliver Bardes '50, 
William Maclay '52. iskipper), 
Edvtjrd Collins '52, and John 
Kimberly '52 (skipper), 'if ale and 
Coast Guard easily took first and 
second from the start of the 
fourteen-race jserles, but third 
place was hotly contested for by 
Williams and Dartmouth right 
down to the last race in "B" di- 
vision when the two colleges were 
tied. In a dramatic fini.sh Kim- 
berly, racing in "B" division, just 
finished ahead of the Dartmouth 
boat, giving Williams third place 
in the meet. The final results 
were 91 points for Yale, 80 for 
I Coast Guard, 56 for Williams, 55 
for Dartmouth, 49 for Trinity, 43 
for Amherst, and 34 for Wesleyan. 

The team that raced in the 
Tufts Quintagonal Regatta con- 
sisted of Ward Mauck '51. Ronald 
Moir '51, John Clary '52, and Wil- 
bur Clary '51. Gus Clary turned 
in an outstanding record of four 
seconds and a fifth. The final re- 
sults were 51 points for M.I.T.. 
44^2 for Northeastern Univer- 
sity, 37 for Tufts, 35 for Williams, 
and 30 for Boston UniveiifSity. 

Bavier Lectures 

Last Pi-iday night in Griffin 
Robert Bavier '40, famed Wil- 
liams' skipper winner of the Mac- 
Millan Cup in '39 and '40, lec- 
tured to the Yacht Club and many 
others on the new ;-ules about 
which he has recently written a 
book. He also showed movies. 




CAiL 
fORf 



\\OV/ CAH A SAL BE AS 
INCANOeSCENT AS VOU AND 
VET SO COOLLY INTELU6ENT?y/ 



Behind our playful plot, our intentions are serious: we want 
you to discover for yourself the welcdme difference in 
cigarettes that philip moRRIS can bring you. 
Established PROOF of that difference is too extensive to be 
detailed here- but prermedical and chemistry students, who 
will be especially interested can get it in published form 
FREE, by writing our Research Dept., Philip Morris Co., 
119 Fifth Ave., U.X. 



119 Fifth Ave., XN.JC. _ 0^ 

PHILIP MORRIS 



CHIAROSCURO (kee-ar-o-tkoo-ro) - A paH*ni 

of light and shod*. 
CIGARETTE HAN0OVER-(lo b> whiiptrtd, n>v«r 

pronounced). That stoU, smokod-out totta, that 

tight, dry favling in your throat dwo to smoking. 
CINEMATIC HOURI (oe-r**) — In short, a brau- 

taous film star. 
HETAIRA (het-olr-oh) — A play-girl (ancwnl 

Or**k *"pt), 
INCAK -.CENT (tn-can-d/si-ant) - Glowing, 
PEDICULOUS (pad-llT-u-lus) - Bug-infistid. 
PYTHIAN (pith' OHin) - Oovelodi from Pythias, 

that famous fritnd. 
SARTORIAL (sar-toi^yal) — As of a snappy sot 

of throods, 

TRINITROTOLUOL (liy-nl-fro-tol-u-ol). T.NT. 
VELLEITY (v*l-lay-tl4a)-A slight nobulous wish. 




FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF UW 

NEW YORK 

Three-Yeor Doy Course 
Four-Year Evening Course 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Member Assn. of Amer. Low Schools 
Matriculants must be College grad- 
uates and present full transcript of 
College record. 

CLASSES BEGIN SEPT. 26th, 1949 
For further information address 

Registrar, Fordham University 
School of Law 

302 Broodway, New York 7, N Y. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can get the out- 
standing news of the day every 
evening through the full leased 
wire Associated Press service in 

all)p Sranarrtvt 

North Adoms, Mass. 
On solo at 5 p.m. on all 
Williamstown Newsstands 



By Steve Blaschke 

A cold and rainy "southern" 
trip produced no victories for the 
varsity baseball team but the ball 
club now has four games under 
its belt and several sophomores 
have had a chance to make their 
bids for slots In the starting line 
up. Seton Hall took the opener 
11-1, Hofstra crushed the Coombs 
men 19-5 while Upsala took a 9-8 
win while Princeton romped to a 
10-0 .shutout in the finale. 

It was still too cold for George 
Ditmar's ailing arm at Seton Hall 
and the Purple had trouble with 
Bob Oliver's southpaw deliveries, 
consequently Seton Hall picked 
up eight runs in the first four 
innings while Williams scored 
only a single unearned dun. Soph-^ ' 
omoie "Ozark" Sheehy finished 
the ball game with a promising 
four hit three inning performance 
while Shay Lynch and Fritz Zel- 
ler collected basehits to .start their 
bids for the centerfield and catch- 
ing .slots. 

MierzejewBlU Triples 

The Rutgers game was called 
because of high winds and it con- 
tinued to be windy at Hofstra 
where the Long Islanders pounded 
out nineteen hits while the Purple 
had their first big inning in a 
hopele.ss cause when IVIierzejewski 
rammed a triple into deep center. 
Tom Healy and Pete Fisher also 
tripled in the late innings while 
George Owen collected two hits 
and Zeller threw out two would- 
be stealers, as well as picking a 
man off first. 

BoB pisson, another sophomore, 
made his bid for a starting role 
with a six hit five inning perfor- 
mance at Upsala, aiding his own 
cause with a perfectly executed 
double squeeze which gave him 
an early lead. Owen took over; in 
the sixth and some lo^pse fielding 
as well as .sevt :al walks<«ave Up- 
sala an 8-5 lead at the stOTk of the 
ninth. At this point George>,%ush, 
a fine second 'base candicXte, 
singled. Lynch doubled and 0» 
singled to tie up the ballgame. 
long triple gave it to Upsala in tlie 
lower half of the ninth. 

Who'll Play First? 

Princeton just had too much for 
Williams as only Zeller. Owen 
and LeSage could solve the two 
Tiger liurlers. Even Owen'.s400fool 
triple went for naught. Despite 
the lopsided- .score Sheehy and 
Ditmar looked good on the mound 
It looked, in fact, as if Ditmar was 
rapidly regaining the pre-in.iury 
form which meant six Williams 
victories and a Little Three crown 
last spring. 

The trip showed that long ball 
hitter Owen belongs in tile clean 
up slot with his .400 average and 
that it will be hard to keep Lynch 
and Zeller out of the lineup. It al- 
so looks as if regulars DeLisscr 
And Waugh may have trouble 
witiistanding Mierzejewski's and 
Bush's bids for third and second 
base jobs. First ba.se is still wide 
open with Ray Mason. Bud Cc >1, 
Pete Fisher and Dick Manning 
still battling it out on even terms. 

Before the official opener at 
Army on the 20th the ballclub will 
play four intersquad games as well 
as an exhibition game with the 
Bridgeport Bees of the Class B 
Colonial league which will be 
played under lights in Bridge- 
port's Candlelight stadium on the 
18th of this month. 



UNDERGRADUATES ARE ALWAYS 
WELCOME — AT THE 



H£)illtams dub 



24 East 39th St. 



New York City 



4 Dining Rooms — 3 stag and one for dotes. The 
Famous Grill Room and Bar. Ladies Cocktail 
Lounge. Theatre Ticket Service. 

Rooms overnight at Special rotes. 

The Williams Club is your club — we hope you'll use it. 



' A 




:'t.itit!lL''f-^-j^]iii^^'\Mh ,' 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATUftpAY, APRIL 16, 1949 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Badgn Rings Stalm 

Jawalty Gifts Favors 

StoNomry Programs 

Club Pins Koys 

Medals Tiophias 

Write or Call 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Woterford, N. Y. 

Telephone Woterford 644 



Lacrosse • 



RARE OPPORTUNITY 

STUDY . . . TRAVEL 

in SPAIN 

Costilian Group-Andolusion Group 

Bosque-Catolan Group 

65 DAYSV- - $975.00 

DEPARTURES JuVjIE 29 to JULY 2 

Sponsored by: 

UNIVERSITY of MADRID 

For Information Write 

SPANISH STUDENT TOURS 

500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y. 



STEELE and WILES 
GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 

BODY and FENDER WORK 
MOTOR OVERHAULING 

Telephone 499-M 
41 Williomstown 

Spring St. Moss. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



and Fraser MoSat each scored 
twice, and Dave Pynchon, Day 
and Cl^ute netted one. 

The flpal' score was 7-1 

Displaying beautiful stlckwork 
and a surplus of lacrosse know- 
how Duke overwhelmed the visit- 
ing Kphmen, 13-4, on Satui^day 
afternoon. Duke opened with, 
three goals in the first three min- 
utes, added one at 6:20 and ano- 
ther at 9:37. WilUams rallied late 
in the first i>eriod, and scored 
three times within three minutes. 
At the end of the quarter Duke 
led 5-3. ' 

In the second period WllUams 
held the Blue Devils to two goals, 
but in the last half the Purple 
brand of ball fell off, and Duke 
racked up three ^oals each period. 
Day, Captain Booker Taliaferro, 
and Buzz Brumbaugh spored inthe 
first quarter, and Maynard dented 
the nets in the flni^l stanza. .. 

The steady defensive play of 
Wasp Simpson, the outstanding 
stickwork of Taliaferro, and the 
brilliant goal-tending of spry Mic- 
key O'Connell were evident 
throughout the trip. Graney led 
the scoring with two goals and 
five assists; Maynard was second 
with four goals and an assist. 

The stickmen will play Union 
this afternoon on Cole Field Ih 
the first game of a home-and- 
home series. Williams trounced 
the Garnets last season,. 12-6. 
Union was drubbed by Army last 
week in a practice game. 






SATURDAY April 16 

John Lund - Wanda Hendrix 

MISS TATLOCK'S 
MILLIONS 

6:35 - 8:45 

SUN.-MON. April 17-18 

Cary Grant - Franchot Tone 

EVERY GIRL SHOULD 
BE MARRIED 

Sun. 2:20 - 4:10 - 5:55 - 8:54 
Mon. 7-9 

TUES.-WED. April 19-20 

Fredric March - Myrna Loy 

BEST YEARS OF 
OUR LIVES 

8:00 only each night 



Fire 



members for two dollars a person, 
the entire proceeds of which will 
go to the Fireman's Benevolent 
Fund, which helps injured and 
needy members. 

Local merchants are contribut- 
ing one hundred merchandise 
prizes, each with a value of from 
five to fifty dollars. Chances are 
being sold for these at twenty-five 
cents each, five for a dollar. The 
winners will be chosen during the 
dance, but holders of the lucky 
numbers needn't be present to win 

J. Fred Walden of the College 
Pharmacy is in charge of the 
ticket and chance sales. He em- 
phasized that college students are 
more than welcomed to the Ball 

After this reporter stopped the 
Chief long enough to get these 
facts about the coming event, he 
went on with his nostalgic re 
miniscing. "Tickets were only a 
dollar a couple with what they 
called "refreshments" included. 
They were real banquets: roast 
cakes, and pies, baked beans 
cakes, and pies, backed beans 
jams and pickles, .the works. The 
only hard refreshment served was 
the tough beef, but it gave us 
enough energy to go on until two 
in the morning!" 






f^^^^JVJV, 



a favorite 

Easter Habit! 



if ... for many an Easter, college 
^ men have favored the fine fit 
^ and good looks of 




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Arrow White Shirts i 




Both oxfords and broadcloths in your preferred 
colkir styles are now available at your Arrow 
deal«r't. See him today for an Arrow white shirt 
and Ao-ow tie. Shirts $3.65 up. Ties $1 .00 upi, . 



Faison Speaks 
On Eakins Art 
Exhibit Here 



Thomas Eakins and his art was 
the subject of an illustrated talk 
b^CProf . Si-Lane Faison of the 
Art "Deijartnte^t, presented on- 
Tuesday "evening, April I3r in 
Lawrence HaU.~Tli^ecture intro- 
duced the Philadelphia Museum 
of Art's Centennial dlnmlating 
Exhibition of 33 paintings, ^sk^- 
ches, and four sculptures by th? 
nineteenth century realist now 
showing in WiUiamstown. 

Mr. Faison first emphasized the 
influences on Eakins' early life in 
Philadelphia, where he was born 
In 1844. He tu;quired a certain de- 
tachment and refinement of taste 
from his studies at the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Fine Arts, but 
left for Europe in 1866 to escape 
from provincialism and the tyr- 
aimy of plaster cast models im- 
posed by local prudery. 

After traveling and studying a- 
broad for four years, he returned 
to Philadelphia to teach and 
paint the cUnical and sportiiig 
subjects which he knew so well 
E%d for which he is most famous. 
Mr. Faison concluded his lecture 
with short discussions of a num- 
ber of slides of these works, many 
of them recently made from the 
exhibit. 



John Wideman, '50, baritones; 
and WiUlam Eddy, '49. and Ben- 
jamin Hellman, '52 basses. The 
contest was judged by Mr. Paul 
Barstow. Mr. David Bryant, and 
Mr. Irving Shalnman. 

The Interfratemlty Sing Con- 
test will continue throughout the 
Spring term. There will be five 
rounds of three houses each com- 
peting, with one house. Delta Up- 
silon, drawing a bye. 

This Monday evening at 10:30. 
Psl Upsilon, Delta Kappa: Epsllon, 
and Slgma-Phl will meet In the 
second round. 'The Dekes wer& 
last year's champions. 
\ Thfr^ontest is under the direc- 
tion of Martin Luthy and is an- 
nounced by ^Ol«i^ Stone and pro- 
duced by Pete Biglei^ 



Ki^ap 



s 



AMT 



K&g. Jr. '60. rRobert E, Joneiijg,: 
Robert Kimbrough III '51, Lewl- 
lyn White '60, and Jqseph Mc- 
Elroy, Jr. '51. 

A modernized Greek chorus 
will supply commentary through- 
out the play. The voices in the 
chorus will be those of Gil Spen- 
cer '50, Howard Cadmus '50, 
Charles Brace '52, Peter Oaks '52, 
and Robert E. Jones '62. 



"Opus 16" - -v^ 

land competition were Amherst, 
(Connecticut Dartmouth, Mld- 
diebury, Mt. Holyoke, and Smith. 
Other Williams entrants were 
those who had received commen- 
dation in the "Comment" Stu- 
dent Art Contest: George Brooks, 
John Fields, Joe "K^ason, and Bill 
Tuttle. ^\ 



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Price 10 cents 



Concert ypniniittee 
Preset!^ Smgher 



Wide Range ^ 
Of Selections 
Well Received 



iAudience Enthusiastic 
Over Steady Star 
From Metropolitan 



by Dan Puch 

After a two month postpone- 
ment, the Thompson Concert 
Committee presented the Metro- 
politan Opera baritone. Martial 
Singher, who gave a warm pro- 
gram of songs ranging from ISth 
Century love songs to several re- 
cent works of Maurice Ravel, 
Monday evening In Chapln Hall. 
The audience of, over 400 enthu- 
siastically received the opera star's 
energetic performance. 

The two hour program, which 
seemed to Improve as it progres- 
sed, was divided Into six portions. 
Beginning with Rameau's "Hymnl 
au Solell" and the early "Jj'Amour 
de mol" and "Tambourln", Mr. 
Slngher's voice seemed a bit cold 
and there were a few rough spots, 
but not so many as to be detri- 
mental to the performance as a 
whole. Rossini's famed, but boring, 
"Largo al factotum" from the 
"Barber of Seville" followed and 
was done In a style both unorth- 
odox and clownish. 

"Staendohen" 

But It was with Schubert's 
widely known serenade "Staend- 
chen" that Mr. Singher made 
himself thoroughly ..felt — the story 
of youthful love so beautifully 
epitomized by Schubert's music 
was given full portrayal by the 
artist. This portion was further 
composed of a selection from 
Faust, "Devant le Malson", "Ser- 
enade" by Oounod, and Brahms' 
"Vergebllches Staendchen", which 
In combination served to display 
Mr. Slngher's versatallty. 

The fourth portion Included the 
varied selections "It Is Enough", 
from Mendelssohn's "Elijah", "Oo, 
Lovely Rose", by Quilter, Williams' 
"The Vagabond", and, the best of 
them, Rachmaninofl's "In the Si- 
lent Night". Three Chansons by 
Ravel composed the following sec- 
tion, "Chanson Romanesque", 
"Chanson Eplque", which was de- 
dicated to the artist by the com- 
poser and was presented by him 
for the first time in Paris four- 
teen years ago, and the vigorous 
and humorous "Chanson a Boire". 
These three songs were rendered 
with such feeling and emotion 
that no one present could miss 
the sincere affection which Mr. 
Singher had for the selections. 
See SINQHER, Page 2 



woe 1 Announces 
Spring Program 

— i 

Canoe Trips, Picnics 

Anwng Activities 

Anticipating the trout sea- 
son by approximately nine hours, 
the members, of the Outing 
Club saw a nl(jvie jjn trout f tehthg 
before turning their atterttloiit to 
S^lng activities at their meeting 
last Thursday evening. 

Most of the weekends between 
the meeting .and exams will of- 
fer some kind of event for the out 
door enthusiasts. Last weekend 
saw many members engaged In 
tWng their luck In the trout 
streams of the Berkshire area oh 
Pfiday and Saturday and travel- 
ling to Amherst for a square dance 
on Saturday evening. 

This weekend, besides Inviting 
sl» other colleges here for a square 
dance, the club'has sent represen- 
tatives to a trout fishing contest 
See woe. Page 4 

■".'. '* :.-■■ • ■■' . ■./ ~""~"- 
'''<Ji\-.''t':.if.'ii: • ■■'.'; ■■'■.■ ' . 



FALSE 

ANNUAL 



(kL>m«MI 



DISRUPTS 
EN'S BALL 



Firemen streamed out of La- 
sell Gym and awfiy from their 
52nd annual Firemen's Ball on 
the double, and students hear- 
ing the incessant blow of the 
fire whistle, poured out of their 
dorms and fraternities with 
equal rapidity Monday evening, 
only to find that a prankster 
had turned In a false alarm 
down on Buckley Street (down 
past the bowling alley) 

Students, thinking it was a 
big fire and evidently anxious 
to heckle the Gale Hose Co. 
for having to break up their 
ball rushed to the scene on 
fenders and in the trunks of 
almost ^5 cars. 



Recent Survey 
Raps Pollstsrs 

w — 

Committee Report 
Explains Errors 

After considerable Investigation 
into polling techniques and. in 
particular, last autumn's presi- 
dential election, the Commute on 
Analysis of Pre-election Polls and 
Forecasts, which was set up by 
the Social Science research Coun 
cil and includes President James 
Phinney Baxter III, released its 
report which attempts to explain 
the pollsters fiasco last November. 

Stressing the hazardous nature 
of elections forecasts from polls, 
the Committee criticized the poll- 
sters for undue optimism in the 
accuracy of their methods and for 
failure to apply in the 1948 cam- 
paign what knew about their past 
errors. > 

Last Minute Shifts 

In a similar vein the Committee 
attributed the failure of the polls 
in part "to the neglecting the pos- 
sibility of a close election" and to 
the inability "to detect shifts of 
voting intention near the end of 
the campaign". The professional 
pollsters, Messrs. Gallup, Roper, 
and Crossley, based their predic- 
tions on surveys taken as early 
as August and at the latest the 
middle of October. 

See ELECTIONS, Page 2 



'Comment^ Sets 
Date For Drive 



Non-Profit Publication 
Seeks Sub9cril)er8 



Ihe new Williams magazine 
"Comment" will launch a giant 
subscription campaign on Mon- 
day, April 25. "Comment" is a 
non-profit student publication 
that satisfies the growing need on 
the campus for a college maga 
zine that presents the best in stu 
dent writing. To maintain a high 
editorial standard "Comment's" 
Joint student-faculty staff con- 
siders and carefully selects for 
publication only high quality ma- 
terial. In addition to work done by 
the "Comment" editorial and art 
staffs, • contributions .from stu- 
dents and faculty are welcomed. 

Although undergraduates and 
teachers are the majority of sup- 
porters, outside subscribers on a 
nation-wide scale are' becoming 
increasingly Interested in this new 
stimulating publication. See your 
social unit representative or drop 
a card to "Comment," Box 310, 
Willlamstown for more informa- 
tion on this magazine. A one dol- 
lar subscription will give you three 
issues and will not expire until the 
spring of 1950. 



Bavier Speaks 
On New Rules 



'Yachting' Editor Shows 
Slides Clarifying Talk 

Robert N. Bavier Jr. '40. and at 
preseent associate editor of 
"Yachting" magazine, spoke be- 
fore an Interested group of local 
sailors on the new yacht racing 
rules, Pi-lday evening in the Gri- 
ffin lecture hall. 

In presenting his review of the 
new rules, Mr. Bavier spoke from 
the unique position of an exper- 
ienced skipper who knows and 
applies the rules under which the 
sport Is conducted. He made am^ 
pie use of informative slides in 
order to facilitate the One hour 
discussion of new alterations in 
the rules of racing, which he ex- 
plained "are slight compared to 
the big upheaval last year." 
Three Important Changes 

Former Williams man Bavier 
pointed out that there are only 
three important changes to the 
rules as they existed last season. 
The first of these makes uniform 
under all conditions the general 
rule that a boat on the starboard 
tack has right of way over all 
boats on port tackSj Borrowing 
further from the dictionary of 
seafaring terms rule changes 
number two and three have to do 
with modifications in the luffing 
rule and in the definition of what 
an obstruction is. 

Bavier explained that it is im- 
portant to know all the rules so 
that you can be sure in a race that 
no one takes advantage of you, 
and that the "real test of whe- 
ther or not you know the rules is 
if you can apply them when in a 
racing Jam." 

Throughout his boating career 
Mr. Bavier has constantly Main- 
tained a brilliant racliig record. 
See RULES, page 4 



LC Proposes 
Drinking Rules 

Discusses Dirty Rushing 
Penalty, House Quotas 



The subject of outdoor drinking 
rules in general and, more 
specifically, those rules for the 
Spring houseparty this year was 
discussed in detail at the UC 
meeting Monday night. Also un- 
der consideration was a proposal 
to change the punishment for 
dirty rushing. 

Entertainment Committee chair- 
man Walter Stern presented the 
new rules on drinking. Infornfel 
drinking on the lawns of the so- 
cial units is not legal. No large 
organized outdoor party is to be 
hrtd before Spring houseparty 
weekend. 

Houseparty Rules 

For that weekend only, these 
rules apply: on Saturday, cock- 
tail parties on porches, with the 
liquor supply indoors, are legal; 
on Sunday milk punch parties are 
legal, but should be held if poss- 
ible on back or side lawns, and 
with no large combinations of 
houses; house presidents have the 
responsibility of keeping down 
the size and noise. 

Stern emphasized the fact that 
his is "a test case for the future," 
that every precaution should be 
taken "to prevent anything from 
going wrong. He asked that houses 
get their houseparty plans into the 
Entertainment Committee early. 
Any organization wishing to spon 
sor the fall houseparty dance must 
report to the Committee by April 
26. 

Dirty Rushing Penalty 
After the passage of the automo- 
bile enforcement rules and the 
adoption of the proposal to elimi- 
nate prowling next year, Rushing 
Committee chairman John Griggs 
brought up the proposed change 
See UC, Page 2 



Weekend To Have 
Variety Of Events 



Tradition Broken As Officials 
Revoke Cabe's Billiard License 



Spring Street's Grand 
Old Man Left Alone 
With Dust, Memories 



Cabe Prindle has covered up 
his seven pool and billiard tables 
to protect them from the dust of 
disuse, and a great era in the 
history of Spring Street has come 
to an end. WlUiamstown's one 
and only pool room fell victim to 
local officials and with It died a 
host of Williams College tradi- 
tions. 

Cabe, now a grey-haired gen- 
tleman of 66, has worked on 
Spring Street since 1899, and for 
the asking he will tell you every- 
thing that has happened there in 
those fifty years. A familiar figure 
to generations of townspeople and 
alumni, today he stands behind 
his soda fountain with his sou- 
venirs of fifty years of baseball, 
selling an occasional candy bar, 
and hoping that the local health 
officials will see fit to restore his 
pool-room license. 

The old-timers and the kids 
still come in to talk with him, 
but the tables with their sombre 
brown covers hiding the green 
felt bear silent testimony to the 
death of a tradition. 

Students Changed 

The soda fountain Is worn and 
tarnished now, but once three 
men worked behind It full time 
and every evening the Williams 
students strolled down Spring 
Street to Prindle's, where each 
man had his favorite cue and the 
clicking of the Ivory spheres nev- 
er ceased until long after closing 
time. Today Cabe knows hundreds 
of old alumni by name. 

In those days. Cabe's was the 
store for Williams men, but that 
was tiefore the coming of the au- 
tomobile let undergraduates get 
out of town every night. Today 




Cobe Prindle, friend of liundreds of 
Williomt men during liii fifty yean 
on Spring Street. 



the students in Cabe's are few 
and far between, and the grand 
old man of Spring Street has been 
struggling along on the business 
of the town's populace in recent 
years, taking a financial loss. 
Sees Every Game 

An avid follower of Williams 
teams, Cabe hasn't missed a foot- 
ball game here since 1906. and 
also has seen every basketball 
game for 43 years. His baseball 
string does not extend back so 
far. because he still was playing 
regularly himself twenty years 
ago. Robert Ripley featured this 
in a "Believe It Or Not" cartoon 
a few years ago. 

Cabe played baseball fop- half 
a century, as a score of yellowed 
newspaper clippings and half a 
dozen autographed baseballs on 
the shelves of his store will at- 
test. '" ' 

"She said 'Cabe is good, but he 
Isn't as good as he thinks he is'." 
he reminisces, with a chuckle. He 
once was offered a professional 
contract in the American Asso- 
ciation (Indianapolis I think It 
was. Maybe Toledo.") but pre- 
ferred to go along with Spring 
Street for better or for worse. 

Cabe's baseball- skill consisted 
mostly of getting hit with a 
See CABE, Page 4 




Harvey Potter, who will serve as 
football line coach under Ed Jontos 
at RPI next year. 



Potter Named 
RPI Mentor 



To Join Coach Jontos 
As Gridiron Assistant 



Harvey Potter will act as 
spokesman for a good neighbor 
policy in athletic circles, when in 
addition to his coaching activi- 
ties at Williams, he will serve as 
line coach in football at Renssel 
aer Polytechnic Institute next 
fall. The popular wrestling and 
lacrosse mentor will commute 
daily to Troy, where he will work 
with Ed Jontos, head grid coach 
of the Engineers. 

Potter succeeds Roland Brown, 
director of RPI athletics, as line 
assistant to Coach Jontos. Brown 
who has been working with the 
football team for the past two 
seasons, asked to be relieved of 
his coaching duties because of his 
heavy duties in the overall di- 
rection of RPI athletics. Potter 
and Jontos worked together from 
1941 to 1946 training the Navy 
Preflight grid teams at Duke 
University, where Potter was al- 
so in charge of wrestling and la- 
crosse. 

Remarkable Wrestling: Records 

In his undergraduate days, Pot- 
ter, who was graduated from Wil- 
liams in 1940, was outstanding 
in several sports. During the past 
two seasons his wrestling teams 
have achieved remarkable results. 
Both the freshman and varsity 
See POTTER, Page 2 

AFS Outlines 
Peace Efforts 

IRC Hears Of Foreign 
Work Camp Openings 



Square Dance, 
''King's Men'' 
HighlightBlast 

Baseball I'eam I'o Face 
U. Mass.; Golf, Frosh 
Lacrosse To Play 



If "variety is the spice of life," 
the Williams campus will betsplcy 
this weekend. The varied program 
of entertainment offered to Bill- 
ville inhabitants includes the 
Adams Memorial Theatre produc- 
tion o£ "AH The King's Men"", 
three athletic events, a sqJTare 
dance in Lasell Gymnasium, and 
an informal, open dance at .the 
Garfield Club. 

Robert Penn Warrens excit- 
ing tragedy will be presented by 
the Cap and Bell's Committee on 
both Friday and Sa|urday , even- 
ings. Cuitain time is 8;30 p.m., 
and the admission is 60 cents. 
Square Dance ,' ' 
The earliest social activity on 
Saturday evening will be the six- 
college square dance sponsored by 
the Outing Club in Lasell Gym- 
nasium. Although dancers will ar- 
rive from Amherst, Holyoke, 
Smith, Springfield and the U. of 
Mass., all Williams students have 
been urged to attend by Outing 
Club officials. 

Marty Lamphier, supported by 
his four piece band, will do the 
calling for the dance, while Al 
Schauffler '49 and his guitar will 
provide entertainment at the in- 
termission. Free cider and dough- 
nuts will be served. Admission to 
the dance, which will last from 8 
to 12 will be 60 cents. 

Hell The Theme 

"Hell" will be the theme of fes- 
tivities at the Garfield Club from 
10 to 2 Saturday evening. Anyone, 
especially escorted females, may 
come to the dance, if they are 
willing to slide down the "chute 
to Hell"" which will be substituted 
for stairs in the main entry\<^y 

Couples can dance to the strains 
of music by the Purple Knights 
in the paneled dining room and 
will be able to And set-ups in the 
training and language room off 
the main dining room. Dry ice 
fumes will add a realistic touch 
to the '"Hellish" decorations. 

Main -event of the sports pro- 
gram Saturday afternoon will be 
the first varsity home baseball 
game which will be played against 
U. of Mass. on Weston field at 
2:30. Golf fans can watch the 
Williams-Hofstra match of the 
Taconic Golf Course at 2:00, and 
lacrosse enthusiasts will have 
their first chance to see the fresh- 
men in action at the frosh matcli 
against Mt. Hermon at 2:30 on 
Cole Field. 



At an IRC-sponsored lecture 
Miss Jean Fairfax college secre- 
tary for the New England office 
of the American Friends Service 
Committee, described her organ- 
ization's global contributions to- 
ward peace on Thursday night 
In Griffin Hall. 

Many of the diverse activities 
of the Friends Service Committee 
are aimed at giving youth a first- 
hand acquaintance with varlou.s 
sociological problems, both In this 
country and abroad, in order lb 
promote a better understanding 
of humanity. Work camps, in 
which students of various na- 
tionalities exchange Ideas while 
doing valuable reconstruction 
work, are being operated in many 
countries. In addition to the work 
camps, the Friends Service Com- 
mittee also provides opportuni- 
ties for students to spend a sum- 
mer working in mental hospitals 
I See FRIEND, Page 4 



Glee Club Plans 
Home Appearance 

Singers To Perform 
With Wellesley Choir 



Singing for the first time in 
Willlamstown this year, the Wil- 
liams Glee Club will present a 
Joint concert with the Wellesley 
Choir in Chapln Hall on Saturday, 
April 30th. The features of the 
selections offered by Williams will 
be Prttfessor Robert Barrow's ar-~' 
rangement of WiUlams songs into 
a phantasy entitled "Wllllamsl- 
ana", and also his arrangement 
of Stephen Sondhelm's song 
"When I See You" from the re- 
cent student musical "All 'iliat 
Glitters". 

Tickets are obtainable from 
Glee Club members or - at Bas-; 
Men's. - Orchestra seats at $1.50 
are reserved and other seats at 
$1.00 are unreserved. 




«.• 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1949 



f tre Baif|^§ 3aje^xr4 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesdoy and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, Telephone 72. 



Volume XLIII 



April 20, 1949 



Number 10 



Employee Pensions 

Several students have come to us chastising the administration 
for having no pension plan for college employees, and we know that 
many others share their sentiments. We have even heard rumors on 
the subject which claim that the present federal social security laws 
malie pensions for our employees mandatory, but that the college 
is violating the law because, to put it bluntly, it is too cheap 
to bear its share of the expense. 

There are a number of oldtimers around whose age is slowly 
forcing them towards retirement lone of them is 78 years old) and 
who. because of such small pay, have nothing to show for their 
many years of worlc for Williams. They have been able to save 
nothing, and, when old age prevents their working, they will have no 
income on which to live. It is inevitable, consequently, that many 
students having dealings with "'these, men have come to view the 
administration as an ugly group of robber barons mercilessly ex- 
ploiting their unfortunate employees. 

Their picture suffers greatly from an insufficient knowledge 
of the facts, however. The present social security act covers employ- 
ees of profit-making organizations only, whereas Williams College 
is a non-profit making, non-taxable institution, so the college finan- 
ciers aren't breaking any laws in order to keep the budget down. And 
this fact that colleges pay no federal taxes, either income or excess 
profit, has important bearing on why they were exempted from the 
original social security law and why very few colleges have adopted 
such a plan on their own. Businesses can charge off most of their 
-social security cost to operating expense, and reduce by that amount 
the income on wliich it has to pay an approximately 38'^ tax. Col- 
leges, on the other hand, have no profits and pay no taxes, so must 
pay the full cost of their social security program without any 
compensatory tax reduction. This means that pensions cost a business 
le.ss than two-thirds as much as they cost a college. 

Students Pay Cost 

Thus the cost of pensions, which will have to be born by the 
students or tlieir parents, is even much larger than it is for business 
organizations which, in addition to this tax difference, have the 
federal aid provided for in the social security bill to aid them. 
It was because of a desire to spare students and their families 
this formidable cost that the Board of Trustees refused to accept 
President Baxter's proposal for a pension plan independent of the 
government when he first proposed it as far back as 1939. And for 
the same reason, they continued to refuse until a year-and-a-half 
ago. when they accepted the idea in principle and began to work 
on a practical plan. 

But by the time the preliminary work was finished and nar- 
rowed down to two different plans, for the Trustees to di.scu.ss and 
choose between, the presidential campaign got underway and 
friend Harry began to stump the country advocating, among other 
things, the videning of soc'al sec'.U'ity benefits to include employee^ 
of non-profit organizations. This, of course, threw a monkey wrench 
into the Trustees' plans, because they didn't want to go to the 
administrative expense and inconvenience of .setting up a college 
plan only to have it immediately replaced by a federal law whicii 
obviates the administrative overhead as well as takes over a portion 
of the actual payments which comprise the major financial burden. 

It was then decided to wait until the government took some 
definite action before the college went ahead with its own plan. 
At present, chances for the passage of the bill HR 2893. look pretty 
bright, but it's impossible to predict the next turn of events in Wash- 
ington. If it is passed, the problem is solved for us; if not. the 
college plans to introduce .some program to give its employees security 
in their old age. In either case, there w'ill be benefits for past service 
and not solely for the future service for which employees will be 
making a share of the payments. 

I not be able to pledge a house for 
i six months. Griggs also propo.sed 



The Clipboard 



FUN FOH THE KroDIES . . . The more advanced members of the 
Williams Faculty might try something along the lines of the Hnal 
exam given to a class in English literature at Moravian College, 
Bethleham. Students were told to write letters of recommendation 
to various characters from literature who were applying for Jobs In 
the present. To top off the quiz there was a cross-word puzzle with 
words taken from the course text-book. This last part was optional: 
students got extra points if they passed it. lost nothing If they flunked. 

TOUJOURS YALIES . . . The Dartmouth College newspaper recently 
ran a feature story on the exploits of a group of Indians who spent 
their spring vacation in Bermuda. The headline ran as follows: 

Students On Spring Expedition Enjoy 
Idyllic Life Until Vale Men Arrive 

WAR OVER: FRAT BACK . . . Southerners are finally getting over 
the Civil War. The Chi Psi fraternity returned to the University of 
Virginia campus a week ago with the purchase of a five-acre estate 
and. fittingly, a manor house. The local chapter was revived after 
a long lapse which" "had its roots in the Civil War" 

LET'S PLAY SOLDIER . . . The ROTC unit at Harvard has come up 
with an idea that might be fun for the troops here at Williams. 
Robert L. Pratt '61. faced a court-martial last Friday for the theft 
oT an army pistol from his professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
Students arranged the mock trial in close imitation of military 
procedure as part of their study of Army justice. ROTC students, in- 
cidentally, are not subject to military law. 

FUN IN THE STACKS . . . Again from Harvard comes news of a new 
library regulation advancing the cau.se of women and. incidentally, 
any undergraduate who happens to have one around. Females 
are now permitted to use the new Lament library two hours each 
week, but under one condition. The authorities have stipulated, for 
reasons which are obscured for security reasons, that all women fnust 
be escorted. 



IMMORTAL VERSE DEPT 



from the "Clemson Tiger" 



uc 



I a quota of fourteen pledges per 
in the penalty for dirty rushing. ; house next fall. Each hou.se would 
Instead of preventing the hou.se be allowed to take five men in 



fi'om pledging anyone that rush- 
ing period, the old puni.shment, 
the UC would be able to fine the 
house $100-$300, As under the old 



post-season iu.shing. Two of the 
five could be freshmen, but the 
two freshmen could not be pledg- 
ed until the rushing period start- 



rule the individual rushed would i jng February 13. 



Potter - 



grapplers maintained undefeated 
records and undisputed i)osses- 
sion of the New England title. He 
has also made great strides in 
lacro.s.se. and just recently return- 



the best teams in the country, 
displayed a spirited, and at times 
very effective, brand of play. 

Saturday, in their first regular- 
ly scheduled game the team de- 
feated Union. 11-7. 
ed from a southern trip in which 
his stickmen. meeting some of 



To send my boy to college 
I put a mortgage on the shack; 
I spent ten thousand dollars, 
And got a quarterback. 

NOTE TO VETS ... Of interest to all those who entertain pleasant 
memories of the U. S. Army will be a recent announcement that the 
new GI's are younger, soberer, than their predessors. The news item 
states; 'Four out of five enlisted soldiers are less than 25 years old. 
They seem to be shifting from beer and bebop to soft drinks and 
sweet music. They nearly all have cameras which they use frequently, 
and they like to pitch horseshoes." 

TOUGH BREAK . . . With the arrival of the spring social season. 
the latest announcement from Governor Dewey's office comes as a 
blow to all tho,se who operate in the Albany and New York City areas. 
The Governor last week approved a bill which would limit the sale 
of spirits by New York State retail liquor stores to fifteen gallons to 
a customer per purchase. 

GRAVY TRAIN . . . Eric K. Ralston of Alstonville. New South Wales. 
Australia, made $58,000 from American soldiers who frequented his 
inn during the last War. The Maryland State Department recently 
received a letter from Ralston stating that he wants to "reciprocate 
the hospitality and generosity" by spending the money on "a rip- 
roaring and one helluva vacation of at least six months " in the U.S.A 

GOING STRONG . . Before vacation we ran an item in this column 
Don Haynes. ex-seaman from Oregon, who at thi t time was start- 
ing out to spend 14 months locked in an automobile to win a $25,000 
bet. At latest report. Don is still with it. When his wife had a baby. 
Don drove his car up a specially constructed ramp to her hospital 
window to view his new son and heir. He then backed down and 
drove down the main street of the town, pa.ssing cigars through 
the barred windows of his welded car. 



Singher 



Elections 



The Committee laid the great 
public reaction to the failure of 
the polling agencies to pick the 
winner to the manner in which 
the polls were presented to the 
people. This caused the public to 
place too much distrust in the 
polls after the election. 

Better Techniques 

Throughout the report was 
stres.sed the point that the failure 
of pre-election forecasts is no cri- 
teria for judging the accuracy or 
value of surveys "in which the 
response does not involve the ex- 
pression of opinion or intention 
to act." The Committee felt that 
election i-eturns were no measure 
of the adequacy of polling on is- 
sues such as the Marshall Plan 
and civil rights. 

For future polling the Commit- 
tee recommended that the accu- 
racy of the polls could be improv- 
ed by better techniques of sampl- 
ing and interviewing. They advo- 
. cated research on social psycho- 



' logy and political science for bet- 
ter analysis of voter's behavior. 
Informed Public 
I Because of the emphasis on 
I public opinion polls, today, they 
; urged that the public be bettered 
informed on the limitations and 
, intelligent methods of interpre- 
ting the polls. The Committee laid 
this task before polling organiza- 
tions, newspapers, and magazines. 
The other members of the Com- 
mittee were; Dr. Samuel S. Wilks. 
professor of mathematical statis- 
tics at Princeton; Mr. Philip M. 
Hauser. Associate Dean. Univer- 
sity of Chicago; Mr. V. O. Key. 
Professor of political science at 
Johns Hopkins University; Dr. 
Carl I. Hovland. chairman of the 
psychology department, Yale Uni- 
versity; Dr. Frank Stanton, pres- 
ident of the Columbia Broadcast- 
ing System; Mr. Frederick Steph- 
an. professor of social stati-sttcs 
at Princeton; Dr. Samuel Stoufler, 
professor of .sociology at Harvard; 
and Dr. Isador Luln of the Ameri- 
can Statistical Association. 



For his first encore he chose an- 
other Ravel piece in a lighter vein. 
"Paysage" 
The concluding section featured 
first two pieces by Hahn. "Pay- 
.sage". a melancholy, reminiscing 
kind of thing which was well done 
but did not add too much to the 
program, while "L'Heure Exquise" 
on the other hand, was exceeding- 



ly pretty. The Aria "Vision fugi- 
tive" from Massenet's "Herodiade " 
concluded the concert in a brish 
fashion. The program selection 
was generally a very good one and 
Mr. Singher'spresentation made 
it thoroughly enjoyable. 

April 30. Saturday, the Williams 
Glee Club will give a concert in 
conjupction with the Welle.sley 
Choir in Chapin Hall at 8:15 p.m. 
It is expected that the program 
will be an exceptionally good one. 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1949 



Football Practice Begins; 
Expected To Last 5-6 Weeks 

Sqipd 



Of 39 Works 
On "Missouri T" 



Thirty-nine candldates^report- 

ed to Coach Len Walters last week ^„„.„.j. c..i n.^ei- 

for Informal spring football drills squad game at the end of spring 



on Cole Field. Workouts will con- 
tinue for five or six weeks for foot 
ball players not participating in 
other spring sports. 

The squad Is wearing full equip- 
ment and has gotten down to 
hard work immediately. Walters, 
aided by line coach Prank Bell, 
is busy Installing the new "Mis- 
souri T" offense, after spending a 
week reviewing the intricacies of 
tire system -at -the-iUniversltyof^ 



Fort Massachusetts 
Restaurant 

Serving Dinners ond Evening 

Snoeki from 5:00 P.M. to 

12:00 Midnite Doily 

Buffet Suppen on Monday 
Nitei 01 usuol 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

TELEVISION NIGHTLY 

Route 2 In North Adorns 
Coll 770 for Reservotlons 



Maryland practices during spring 
vacation. 

Coach Walters plans to con- 
tinue with the emphasis on indi- 
vidual work for several weeks, 
with a limited amount of contact 
work later and possibly an inter 



drills. He has Invited all who are 
interested to participate in the 
piactices, if they do not belong 
to other spring athletic squads. 
Sixteen Veterans 
Most other Williams football 
opponents for 1949 also are hold- 
ing spring workouts, with some of 
them having called out the can- 
didates last month for Indoor 
drills. 

^' Stxteeh-ffiefTlffoRnSlii'^eTr^ 
varsity squad are practicing on 
Cole Field now, together with a 
dozen freshmen and eleven upper 
classmen who were not out last 
fall. Captain and quarterback Stu 
Duf field heads the list of letter- 
men. 

Backs Cliff Parmer, Whit Piske, 
Howie Smith, and Pete Smythe 
are well-known to followers of 
William.s football, while Bill 
Sperry and Pele DeLisser are 
combining football with baseball 
See FOOTBALL, Page 4 



L G. BALFOUR CO. 

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Jewelry Gifts Fovors 

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Medals Trophies 

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Telephone Waferford 644 



Tiger Tennis 
Team Topples 
Williams^ 7-2 

Princeton Wins All Six 

Singles Matches; Eph 

Doubles Teams Star 



Princeton's net team repulsed 
the Ephmen 7-2 last Saturday, 
but the visitors made a better 
Showing against the Tigers than 
a Chaffee-coached team ever had 
in the past. Doubles play was 
markedly improved, and three 
Purple singles men drove their 
opponents into extra-set matches 
before succumbing. 

New England champions Fred 
^crilmer- -and - Gaistain- — Charlie 
Schaaf were forced to default 
to Princeton's number one duo 
because of Schaaf's sprained 
thumb. However, the number two 
doubles team of Pete Thurber and 
Stu Robinson, and the Number 
three pair of Bud Treman and 
Tom Kent both ran off straight 
.set victories. 

Sweep Singles 

Princeton triumphed in all six 
singles matches, although Schaaf, 
Palmer, and Treman's matches 
all went into extra sets. As in the 
North Carolina meet, Schaaf had 
match point several times, but 
was unable to win. Purple ace Stu 
Robinson dropped his match 6-3. 
6-4, while Scribner and Thurber 
both lost by 6-2, 6-3 scores. 
Summary 
, Gaines iP) beat Robinson iW) 
6-3.6-4. Parmele <P) beat Schaaf 
iW) 5-7, 9-7, 6-4, RaleighiP) beat 
Scribner (W) 6-2, 6-3, Blair(P) 
beat Palmer iW) 4-6, 6-3, 6-1, 
Highley(P) beat Thurber W) 6-2. 
6-3, and Bucknell (P) beat Tre- 



Varsity Nine 
Faces Army 

Season's Opener Held 
At Doubleday Field 



Cold weather cancelled the 
baseball teams' only pre-season 
game with the Bridgeport Bees of 
the Class B Colonial league in 
which a mysterious lefthander 
named Harry Sutton was sup- 
posed to show Off a lethal curve- 
ball. Sutton may get a chance to 
pitch in the official opener with 
Army to be played at West Point 
this afternoon bill knuckletoall 
expert Harry Sheehy has been 
named as the official starter. 

Army, which has won three 
while losing only one so far will 
.field jj'irJiially.^ -tlie-_-same _jteajii 
which beat the Purple 4-2 last 
year. One of the Cadet victories 
was a 9-8 thriller over the same 
Hofstra team which mangled Wil- 
liams 19-5. George Ditmar pitched 
the last two Army games, losing 
both in the late innings by 6-2 
and 4-2 scores. The probable Pur- 
ple batting order will see center- 
fielder Shay Lynch lead off, fol- 
lowed by shortstop Don LeSage 
and first sacker Ray Mason. Owen 
should be in the cleanup slot with 
leflflelder Ralph Mason and third 
baseman Stan Delisser in the fifth 
and sixth slots. Second baseman 
Jim Waugh is the number seven 
hitter followed by catcher Fritz 
Zeller and,,pitcher Sheehy. The 
Mass. State nine will supply the 
opposition tor Saturday's home 
curtain-raiser. 

mamW) 6-2,4-6,6-3;' Raleigh- 
Blair (Pi beat Scribner-Schaaf 
iW) by default, Robinson-Thur- 
ber (W) beat Werner-Scott iP) 
6-2, 6-3, and Treman-Kent (W) 
beat Scott-Reese <P) 10-8. 6-1. 




Williams Lacrosse learn 

Recovers Jo Trim Union 



Forbes N orris 
Captures New 
Marathon Title 



Mc William 8, Maynard, 

Graney Cop Scoring 

Honors For Game 



Sandy Lambert Places 
Second In N. E. Meet; 
Keid Swims Fourth 







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Forbes Norris, the indefatigable 
Harvard distance swimmer, pro- 
ved once again that in New Eng- 
land competition in the marathon 
races, he is tops. The Eastern In- 
tercollegiate 1500-meter champ- 
ionj^andjhlrd njan lii^the Qountj-y 
over that course, added anotheV, 
win to his string by winning the 
New England A. A. A. U crown 
Thursday night in Lasell Gym- 
Pool. 

Norris, who swam in the Olym- 
pics last summer, pulled into an 
early lead in his heat, was never 
headed, anjd was clocked at the 
finish line in the good time of 
20:08.4. This wa.s about a quarter- 
minute faster than Williams' 
Sandy Lambert's time. Lambert, 
who finished sixth in the Nat- 
ionals, hit a 20:23.4 a.s lie won the 
first heat. 

Gene Latham, national Boy's 
Club champion in the 440-yard, 
and 1500-meter races, put up a- 
good battle with Lambert in the 
first heat. Latham, who was re- 
presenting Providence Central 
Boys' Club, was able to keep pace 
with Lambect until about mid- 
way through the race, but from 
then on could not stay even with 
the steady Lambert. 

Bob Reid was second to Norris 
in the second heat, but his time 
was just 2.6 seconds slower than 
Latham's, and the Purple co-cap- 
tain elect liad to be content with 
a fourth. Harvard's "bfale Hill was 
fifth. Hank Wineman, a third 
Eph entrant, swam about a third 
of the race backstroke, finished 
seventh. Other events on tlie pro- 
gram were four races for the Wil- 
liamstown Boys' Club and an in- 
teresting Water Ballet by an Am- 
erican Red Cro.ss outfit in Pitts- 
field. 



by Coke Scofield 

Starting their home season 
sluggishly, the Williams lacrosse 
team came from behind to trim 
Union on Cole Field Saturday, 
lJ-7. The generally sloppy game 
was marred by over-zealous of- 
ficials who called thirty nine pe- 
nalties during the sixty minutes 
of the contest. 

Union jumped to an early lead 
on three goals within the first 
ten minutes of play, as Causey, 
Rost-,-and Quinlan notched coun- 
ters for the visitors. Williams was 
unable to break into the scoring 
columh^ until 5:14 of the second 
period i^jien Gordy McWilliams 
converted a nass from Buzz Brum- 
baugh into a ^oal. The rest of the- 
Purple attack were quick to fol- 
low his example "'frd soon pelted 
Goalie Grant, who last year re- 
ceived All-America honors, with 
six more tallies before tK^ half- 
time internjission. Eat Gtffijey 
and Ed Maynard each garnered 
two and Captain Austy Taliaferro 
and McWilliams added one apiece 
durinR this time. 

Slow Second Half 

In the second half the scoring 
'was even, as Union tried desper- 
ately to tie the count while Har- 
vey Potter cleared the Williams 
bench. Taliaferro and Phil 'Van^ 
Du.sen notched two quick goals 
to open the third period, which 
Union was unable to match until 
ten minutes later, when George 
scored twice and Hoffman once 
to make the score 9-6. McWill- 
iams and Maynard each tallied 
once for Williams and Rost for 
the Garnet to make the final score 
11-7. 

The Rame was sloppily played, 
due in part to the wet ground. Tire 
Ephmen were not up to the style 
of play they exhibited on their 
Spring trip, frequently missing 
loose balls. Union's twenty-two 
and Williams .seventeen penalties 
slowed the game to a snail's pace, 
and the extremely cold weather 
hampered the players. 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1949 



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Football 



this spring. Joe Ferrl, sophomore 
transfer from Michigan who 
was imavallable last fall, Is being 
counted upon heavily for back- 
f leld service next year. 

Bill Campbell and Jim Conway, 
Tom Leous, and Dan Mahoney are 
veteran linemen, and several fresh 
men and sophomores have shown 
promise of helping out up front. 
Only two regdlars will be lost 
from the 1948 ball club by gra- 
duation in June. 



Friend - • 



or with labor groups. 

Tells Of Requirements 

Due to the cost involved in 
sending a student to work camps 
abroad, the Friends Service Com- 
mittee can send only about sixty 
American students to Europe. 
The enrollment for Europe this 
summer is filled, but there are 
openings for students wishing to 
participate In a work camp in 
Mexico. Requirements involve a 
knowledge of one other language 
beside English and a _desite„tQ. 
"work for peace". The Friends 
Service Committee will defray 
whatever costs the student can- 
not meet. 



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English Titles 

MURDERERS AMONG US 

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RECORD 
ADVERTISERS 



woe . . . 



at Amherst. Oirls from Holyoke 
and Smith are expected to arrive 
to spend the evening and take 
part in a picnic on Sunday. 

On April 30 an outing with Mt. 
Holyoke has been planned, as well 



Miss Fairfax, who returned 
from Austria last; October, "spoke 
of the European problem as she 
saw it through her work in Aus- 
tria. The 'Marshall Plan, econ- 
omic reform, and favorable wea- 
ther for crops have alleviated the 
physicial problem, leaving the psy- 
chological problem as the biggest. 
IRC Eleotions 

At a meeting of the mc prior 
to the lecture. Art Sprung, '60,> 
was J re-elected president, while 
Henry , Weaver, '50, was elected 
vice-president. Morgan Murray, 
'50, wa« chosen treasurer, Schuy- 
ler Haskell, '50, recording secre- 
tary and Harry Ess, '50, corres- 
ponding secretary. The Club a- 
dopted a new constitution and 
discussed plans for attending a 
conference at Barnard College 
April 30 and one at Smith on the 



weekend of May 7. 



HAVE YOU MADE 
YOUR HONEYMOON PLANS? 

If you are seeking a place of great 
natural beauty, where you will find 
congenial young companions, and 
plenty to do, where you can rest 
(breakfast until 11:001, and play, 
and enjoy omazing meals — here Is a 
lovely old homestead whose guests all 
are newly morried. It is friendly and 
informal with just the right omount 
of privocy. You may have a cottage 
all your own Iheoted, with both), or 
a cheery, inviting room with bath. 
Open all year. Rotes include meals. 
Mention dotes if you wish our "Three 
Honeymoon Plans." The Farm on the 
Hill, Box 6408, Swiftwater, Po. 



as a canoe trip with RPI In the 
Lake Oeprge area. The following 
weekend several members will tra- 
vel to Dartmouth for the annual 
Woodsman's Weekend. Members 
having skills in wood chopping, 
canoeing, or baU caEjtijQ^ were 
urged to go on the trip. Trials will 
be held by the cltlib to choose the 
most skilled men in ^ch ,event. 

On the same weekend, some of 
the WOC'ers may go to Cornell 
for an Intercollegiate outing. May 
31 has been chosen as the date of 
a faculty-student picnic on Mt. 
Qreylock. 

The announcement was made 
that Ned Collins '52 had won the 
contest to design an Outing Club 
emblem and that all full members 
will receive an emblem next year. 
Dues for the coming year will be 
raised to $2. 



Cabe 



pitched ball once ,or twice a 
game and stealing second, third, 
and home in rapid succession. 
Mr. Prindle is proudest of the 
four home runs he hit in those 
fifty years, however. 

Never a man to feign false mod- 
esty, he boasts that he can do 
something which no Williams Col- 
lege professor can do — name 
the presidents of the United 
States in order in 12 seconds, and 
name the presidents of Williams 
College in order. Not only that; 
he can instantly give you the 
months of the year or the days 
of the week in alphabetical order: 
"April, August, December...". 

Cabe Prindle graduated from 
Williamstown High School in 
1899, and started working on 



Rwl^es — 

which includes capture of the 
MacMillanxCup, emblematic of in- 
tercoUegiatexyacht racing supre- 
macy. The MacMlllan honor was 
won both in 1939 and 1940, while 
he was competli» under the bur- 
gee of the WlUiaV Yacht Club, 
of which he was bommodore In 
those years, — \ 

His latest claim \fi string fame 
is as a member of the^rew on 
the American boat which recent- 
ly twice defended the Scandinav- 
ian Gold Cup champlonshlp\a- 
gainst Sweden. \^ 



Spring Street in a shoe store. For 
a time he owned his own lunch- 
room and bowling-alley across 
the street from his present Rud- 
nlck-owned establishment next to 
the House of Walsh, but in 1917 
he moved over to work in the pool- 
hall where he is today. 



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UNiyERSITY of MADRID 

For Inforaiatleii Write l 

r4iSHSTUD|KTT0UU„J 

Flftiix^ve., N.Y. 11, NY. ; ' 



-w 



Even Mr. Roberts)' 



/ 



Stanley, on the front desk ot the Williams Club, New York ^dn ,er 
you seats for practically anything, including operas, rodeos bnd ..« 
hockey in season. / ^ 

Chances are the Club can also put you up overnigl;it^ — pledsant 
rooms at special rates to undergroduotes. Ladies Cocktail Lounge 
and Dining Room, if you've asked o dote or ij you'r* stuck w.th 
one; and solid meals end drinks in the grill. / x 

^he Williams dhib 

24 East 39th St., New York City 

Undergraduates are always welcome! 

Its Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



/ A %J Zy{ 



"My cigarette Is 

Chesterfield 

because tliey're 

so MILD." 

STARRING IN "ALIAS NICK BEAL" 

A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 















\'<b 



.^^^"^ 



^ "I smoke Chesterfields 



I 



MAKE YOURS T^E MILDER cigarette f 



MORt CniLEGE STUDENTS SMGKl CHf STERFILLDS 
THAN ANY OTHFR CIGARETTE -"- w,,r,, N.nnN., .„.vi. 



Copyright I9W, Ijodnr ti Mviti TotMrn C 



ilr^*ili 



/olume XLIll, Number 1 1 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




Price 1 cents 



[ay Revises Coaching StaflF, 
;ha£fee Named Soccer Coach 



\ullock Made 
[ssL Director 
\0f Athletics 

Coombs Takes Frosh 
Football Post; Muir 
Gets Yearling Soccer 



cr 



Clarence Chaffee, coach of 

[squash and tennis, wUl take over 

as varsity soccer coach ne... /all, 

{Robert Mulr will, coach freshman 

I soccer, and Robert Coombs will be 

the freshman football coach with 

Royer Collins '50 as his assistant, 

Athletic Director John Jay an- 

I nounced Wednesday morning. 

Chaffee replaces J. Edwin Bul- 
I lock, who will become Assistant 
to the Director of Athletics, in 
charge of football tickets. Bul- 
I lock acting director of athletics 
last fall before Mr. Jay assumed 
his duties here, will continue as 
varsity wrestling coach and Direc- 
tor of Physical Education. 

Bob Muir was coach of junior 
varsity soccer last fall, and Is var- 
sity and freshman swlnmilng 
coach. 

CoUlna Ex-player 

Bobby Coombs, coach of varsity 
baseball and freshman basketball, 
succeeds Dale Burnett as fresh- 
man football coach after assis- 
ting at that Job last year. Burnett, 
formerly varsity basketball coach, 
and freshman baseball coach this 
spring, will not return to Williams 
next year. 

Roy Collins has been on tlie 
varsity football squad the last two 
seasons, but was slaeliried by In- 
juries during most of the 1B48 
campaign. 

Potter, PUniky Remain 

Mr. Jay still Is considering sev- 
eral prospective candidates for 
the job of head basketball coach 
and assistant football coach, to 
work in football with head coach 
Len Watters and assistant Frank 
Bell, as a replacement for Harvey 
Potter. Potter was appointed line 
coach at Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute in Troy, N.Y. last week, 
but will remain at Williams as 
head coach of lacrosse and coach 
of freshman wrestling. 

Tony Plansky will continue as 
cross country next fall. 



Weekend Sees First 
Spring Date Influx 

The first social weekend 
since Spring vacation will see 
a large Influx of dates on the 
campus this evening. LaSalle 
Oymnaslum will be the scene 
of the Outing club's six-col- 
lege square dance from 8-12 
p. m. The Adams Memorial 
Theatre curtain rises at 8:30 
on Robert Penn Warren's play 
"All the King's Men." At 10 
the Oarfleld Club's open dance 
Will begin, lasting until 2. 

This afternoon's sports pro- 
gram Includes a varsity base- 
ball game with University of 
Massachusetts at Weston Field 
at 2:30, a golf match with Hof- 
stra at 2 on the Taconic links, 
and a freshman lacrosse game 
with Mt. Hermon at .2:30 on 
Cole Field. 



SAC Regulates 
Advisor Under 
Revised Set-Up 

Committee Established 
To Organize Campus 
News Dissemination 



Auer Outlines 
Pubiishingjob 

Cites Experience Gained 
From Student Mewspaper 



Students Give 
French Play 

Try Language Skill 

In AMT Monday 



The members of "Le Theatre 
Intlme", a post war revival of a 
former Williams play-producing 
organization, will present "The 
Imaginary Invalid" In the Adams 
Memorial Theatre, on Monday 
evening at 8:16. The product of 
cooperatlv eeffort between French 
students and some members of 
the faculty, this three-act comedy 
boasts a cast of eleven characters 
under the directorship of Prof. 
John D. O'NelU and Arthur Le- 
vitt. 

Prof. Elliot M. Grant was per- 
suaded to Uke the leading part 
In the character of Argan, (the 
Imaginary Invalid), with the sup- 
Port of Alice Peretmer, French in- 
structress at the Buxton School, 
Mrs. Helen Kelly, Mary Joslyn, 
Shd Palrlcla Lainsbn in the femi- 
nine roles, and James Davis, Bor- 
8le Dannfelt, Thomas Edwards, 
Malcom Prazler, Jeremy Dresser, 
and James Howe In the remain- 
ing masculine parts. 

Staging and lighting will be 
handled by WUUam Tuttle, Peter 
Camp, and Peter Candler, with 
make-up responsibilities falling 
to John Lassell and James Dls- 
jwll. 

WMtten by the celebrated 
See STUDENTS, page 4 



"A Career in Publishing" was 
the title of an Informal talk given 
last Monday evening at the Alpha 
Delta Phi house by Bernhard M. 
Auer, '39, circulation manager of 
"Time" Magazine. The talk was 
part of this year's series of voca- 
tional guidance talks sponsored 
by the Undergraduate Council 
and the Placement Bureau. 

"After leaving college, fob se- 
lection Is extremely Important: 
pick a job you really like and then 
analyze yourself to see If you are 
really qualified for It" was Mr. 
Auer's first piece of advice. Then 
he went on to discuss the publish- 
ing business by describing his own 
early experiences with it. At Wil- 
liams, he had worked on the RE- 
CORD and other publications. 
"If you plan to enter publishing, 
these publications give an op- 
portunity that you will not have 
again for a long time, to see the 
whole scope of the business" Pus 
lishlng, he explained, is highly 
specialized. One does not rise high 
enough In it so that he can see 
beyond the particular job he hap- 
See AUER, page 4 



Eph Octet To Sing 
In Boston Tonight 

Meets With Harvard, 

Amherst, Bowdoin 



"Octets, Etcetera," a concert of 
double quartets to be held in Jor- 
dan Hall in Boston tonight, will 
feature the Williams Octet and si- 
milar singing groups froin Har- 
vard, Amherst, and Bowdoin. Con- 
ceived by members of the "Med- 
dlebempsters," Bowdoin counter- 
part of the Williams Octet, the 
concert Is being given to acquaint 
the public with some of the bet- 
ter known New England octets. 

The "Meddlebempsters" toured 
the US Occupation Zone of Ger- 
many last year under the sponsor- 
ship of the army, and In addition, 
are veterans of numerous tele- 
vision and radio broadcasts. 
Octet Concerts 

Among the concerts which the 
Octet has sung this year, are ap- 
pearances at Skidmore, Emma 
WlUard, Bennington, The Univer- 
sity Glee Club of Hartford's "Pops 
Night", civic groups in North 
Adams, and on the Williams cam- 
pus. 

The concert will be under the 
direction of Dr, Malcolm Holmes 
of the New England Conservatory 
of Music He will also act as mas- 
ter of ceremonies. The Harvard 
"Krokodlloes" and Amherst's 
"DQ's" are the other two groups 
which will appear tonight. 



Ift an effort to secure more effi- 
cient dissemination of news about 
the campus, the Student Activi- 
ties Coimcil has passed a series 
of new rules dealing with the pub- 
lication of the "Advisor" and the 
printing of posters. 

Beginning next September, the 
SAC will pay a yearly salary of 
$100 to the men who are selected 
to put out the "Advisor," and 
these men will turn over all pro- 
fits to the SAC. Previously, these 
profits, usually amounting to a- 
bout $80 per year, had gone to 
the editors of the Advisor. 
Impose Fine 

Other rules which go Into ef- 
fect Immediately are: 

1) A fine of $1.00 for each time 
the Advisor Is not put out, with 
three offenses resulting In dis- 
missal. 

2) A maximum of fifteen words 
for each notice, aside from notices 
by the administration. (This may 
be modified In certain cases at 
the discretion of those putting out 
the "Advisor".) 

3) No commercial ads except the 
Taconic Theatre. 

Members of the SAC News Bu- 
reau will meet with those chosen 
to put out the "Advisor" next 
year tit) draw up a definite format, 
so that the arrangement of notices 
will be uniform. This format will 
not include space for humorous 
notices or plugs. Schuyler Brooks 
'50, President of the SAC, ex- 
pressed hope that these new rulps. 
in addition to putting the "Advis- 
or" directly under SAC authority, 
would eliminate the complaints 
about its management. 
Limit Posters 

The unsightly practice of tack- 
ing up posters on trees, buildings, 
has been made illegal. By limiting 
the size of all posters, the SAC be- 
lieves there will be adequate room 
for all posters on the existing bul- 
letin boards. Moreover, the ad- 
ministration is planning to erect 
See SAC RULES, page 4 



Army Downs TNine, 10 - 8; 
Time Limit Saves Cadets 



Juniors Plan 
Big Weekend 

Houseparty To Feature 
Formal, Picnic, Jazz 



Relying on WlUlamstown weath- 
er Is risky, but the Junior Class 
which Is sponsoring the Spring 
Houseparty, ■ Is doing just that. 
An outdoor formal, beer picnic, 
five athletic events, and a jazz 
session at Jesup are the highlights 
of the weekend program, accord- 
ing to Norman S. Wood '50, chair- 
man of publicity. 

The formal dance Friday night 
from 9-2 will be held in the park- 
ing lot behind the AMT. Admis- 
sion will be free to every student, 
the cost bemg defrayed by a tax 
of $100 on each house and $200 
on the Garfield Club. Lawrence 
E. Fitch Jr. '50, chairman of the 
dance committee, announced that 
Skip Towne and his Orchestra, 
who was heard at the Football 
Dance last fall, will be alternated 
with Bobby Hackett's Quintet to 
provide continuous music. Both 
bands have featured vocalists. 
Students are reminded that the 
UC ruling of no drinking at col- 
lege dances will apply. 
Beer Picnic 
From 12-2 on Saturday the 
junior class is giving a beer pic- 
nic for the senior class on the up- 
per level of the Cole Field area. 
Barry A. Benepe '50, in charge of 
the picnic arrangements, said that 
Softball, three-legged races and 
"crew ' races will be organized. 
A Similar freshman-sophomore 
class picnic will be held on the 
lower level of Cole Field. 

Five outstanding athletic e- 
vents will be in progress during 
the afternoon for the entertain- 
ment of undergraduates and their 
dates: Varsity baseball with Un- 
ion, 3 p. m. Weston Field; Fresh- 
man baseball with Wesleyan, 2 
p. m- at Cole Field; New England 
Tennis Championships on the 
See JUNIORS, page 4 



Saturday Breakfast Society 
Revives Old Williams Eating 
And Drin king ClubTradition 

by Dave Ruder 

"Shades of 1914" can be seen any Saturday morning this Spring 
by early risers who stumble upon 7 a. m. meetings of the newly 
organized "Breakfast Club." Designed to do away with those early 
morning doldroms and satisfy that weekend party urge, the club 
brings back the old days of Kappa Beta Phi, the pre-prohibltion 
marching and chowder society. 

The old drinking club, called^ . - 

the "shadow of Phi Beta Kappa," that early rising can have pleas- 
ant effects. 

The society has preferred to re- 
main anonomous, but neverthe- 
less, Its fame has spread rapidly 
over the campus. AAA Is In ac- 
cord with Williams tradition of 
social eating and drinking clubs. 
One sueh organization called it- 
self the "Moonshiners", another, 
"The Knights of the Broken 
Shanty". 

Club Slogans 
In the years gone by, drinkers 
used various slogans to describe 
their activities; Over 75 years ago 
the "Rams": 

"Rammed last night boys; 
Rammed the night hefdre". 

Rammed to-night boys; ;<> 

Prospectively rainmed some i&ote." 
"The Graceful O^faeljes'''' claim- 
ed to,'?rrlp.the;<]lJght Ftintastlc' 
duriiisr 'tiheij a;ctlYltle|s: 

Alpha Alpha Alpha's constitu- 
tion wf>s drawn up during the re- 
cent eclipse of the moon. It's 9!^- 
gannhas thus far ttCien kept secret 
by club members, as have its 
officers. 



while frowned upon by certain 
authorities, managed to exist at 
Williams from 1902 until 1922. 
when It died a natural death. 

Better things are planned by 
the new organization, which has 
taken the Greek letters Alpha 
Alpha Alpha as Its official title, 
and adopted Antl-Alcohollcs An- 
onomous as its unofficial moni- 
ker. Membership In the club is 
limited and non-partlclpating 
members are promptly expelled. 
Both actives and pledges In this 
hew group practice principles of 
good fellowship during their early 
morning meetings. Memliers re- 
port that morning classes are 
much more enjoyable after early 
activity. 

Faonlty Invited . 
Although pledges must arrive 
at the official 7 a. m. starting 
time, charter members may en- 
ter the meeting as late as 7:30. 
Spirited members have occasion- 
ally Jumped the gun tmd started 
their parties the, previous evening. 
Breakfast Club ' Invitations have 
thus far been ideclined by faculty 
members, but the AAA's are hop- 
ing to convince tbelr professors 



Impromptu Speaking 
Contest To Be Held 

The Ellzur Smith Contest In 
Impromptu spealdng will be 
held In 5 Oriffin at 8 p. m. 
next Tuesday. 

Each contestant will be giv- 
en three minutes to prepare a 
two-three minute speech from 
a list of three topics. The prize 
will be awarded more for or- 
ganization of si)eaking mater- 
ial and for confidence in speak- 
ing than for being well in- 
formed on the topic. 

No preparation Is necessary 
for speaking in the contest. 
Those Interested in competing 
should register with Professor 
George C. Connelly. 



Billvilie Hails 
Rotary Circus 

Animals, Clownti, Actor 
Appear Here Today 



Don't look now, but the circus 
is in town. Today is the happy 
day for "Big Top" fans between 
the ages of eight and eighty as 
the Rotarian-sponsored show 
holds sway in the baseball cage. 
Not only will clowns be amusing 
and acrobats be thrilling circus 
enthusiasts, but a large midway, 
complete with sideshows, has been 
set up- inside the board track for 
the "Step-rlght-up ..." follow- 
ers 

Imported Acts 

In their efforts to raise $2000 
for uniforms for the Willlamstown 
High School band, the local Ro- 
tary Club has gone all out to pro- 
cure the best talent available and 
has come up with six "stupen- 
dous" acts. Mendosa and his Aero- 
Marvel Dogs will be there along 
with the "world famous" juggler, 
Alan Norton. And for variety the 
Herzogs, girl trapeze artists, will 
be on hand as will the Parker 
Brothers, an acrobatic team. 

Snookums, the Himalayan Won- 
der Bear who recently made his 
television debut on the Milton 
Berle show, will be featured and 
just to keep the Kiddies laughing, 
Jazzo the Clown will fill in the 
odd minutes. There'll be wild ani- 
mals galore, refreshments, and 
prizes for lucky program holders. 
And to top the show off. Jack 
LaRue, Hollywood screen villain, 
will appear during each of the 
four performances at 1:30, 4, 7, 
and 9:30 p. m. 

See BILLVTTJ.K. page 4 



Sigma Phi Victor 
In Fraternity Sing 

Sextet Gains Semi-Finals 
Eliminates '48 Champs 



The Sigma Phi sextet swept to 
a victory by a unanimous deci- 
sion of the judges In the second 
round of the taterfratemlty sing 
Monday night in the Studio 
Theatre of the Adams Memorial 
Theatre. The Sig's defeated Del- 
ta Kappa Epsilon, last year's 
champions, and Psi Upsilon. 

The members of the wlimlng 
team were Alexander Clement '49, 
fli-st tenor; ftlchard B. Palmer '5D, 
and Clayton Prltchett, '50 sec- 
ond tenors; John Stone '52, and 
Edward Young '50, first basses; 
and Klngsley Rice '52, second 



Fisher Slugs 
Triple^ Homer 
In 5'Run 7th 



Sheehy Pitches Opener 
Purple Hacks Up Two 
Kuns In First Inning 



by Steve Blasclike 

A West Point rule that no lim- 
ing may begin after 6:20 P.M._ 
came to the Cadets' rescue last 
Wednesday when Bobby Coombs 
baseball team came up with five 
runs in the last of the seventh to 
move within two runs of the 
Army lead. The rule erided the 
ballgame at this point, however, 
with the future lieutenants still 
hanging on to a sUm 10- 8 edge. 
Pete Fisher sparked the late inn- 
ing Williams resurgence with a 
triple and a mighty two run hom- 
er in his two times at bat. 

The Purple announced that 
they were intending to give the 
Army sluggers a hard time to 
the very first inning when Cap- 
tain Don LeSage and Ray Mason 
walked to set the stage for George 
Owen's single and Ralph Mason's 
grounder which drove in two Pur- 
ple runs before Army had ever 
been at bat. Starter Harry Sheehy 
hung on to this lead for two inn- 
ings with the help of a diving 
catch by DeLisser and despite a 
triple by footballer Galiffa. 
Army Guns Roar 

Jim Irons, the Army's football- 
playing tatcher, singled to open 
the third and the trouble started. 
Two bases on balls, an error and 
two stolen bases tied up the ball- 
game, while a long double gave 
the cadets a 4-2 lead before Shee- 
hy could put out the fire. With a 
new Army pitcher silencing the 
Eph batters his teammates picked 
up two more runs on a couple of 
walks, an error and a single. 
Things got worse in the fifth when 
Stuff, the clean-up hitter led off 
with a homer over the left field 
fence. Irons followed with anoth- 
er homer shortly thereafter, this 
time with a man on base and left- 
hander Harry Sutton ended the 
inhing in Sheehy 's place. 

With the score 9-2 the comple- 
xion of the game began to change. 
A walk, a Zeller single and a cou- 
ple of errors produced the ' third 
Williams run in the sixth which 
was equalized by another Army 
score In the lower half of the inn- 
mg- A preview of things to come 
occured when Ralph Mason ended 
that inning with a circuit catch 
at the left field fence. Pete Fisher 
took over first base and the ball- 
game in the seventh when he led 
off with a linedrive triple but was 
thrown out at third when the 
coaching staff got confused and 
tried to send him home. 
See ARMY, page 4 



Cabe Allowed 
To Reopen 

License To Be Granted 
After Minor Repairs 



The winner of next week's con- 
test, Alpha Delta Phi. Delta Psl. 
or Delta Phi, will meet the SIgs 
and KA's in the semi-finals In 
May. Three members of the fac- 
ulty. David C. Bryant,' 'Tfvlnff 
Shainman. and Paul R.' Barstow 
acted as Judges. 



Cabe Prindle's Spring Street 
pool and billiard parlor, for many 
years a second home for WlUiams 
men. will soon be open for busi-~ 
ness again. Cab^'s license was sus- 
pended on April 1 by the town 
selectmen at the request of the 
Board of Health. 

As soon as minor plumbing re- 
pairs have been made and the 
Interior of the pool-room Is put 
Ip satisfactory condition, the sua- , 
pension will be lifted. Cabe, now 
operating the store for the thirty- 
second year, has seen every Wil- 
liams College football and bas- 
ketball game since 1606. 




V 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 1949 



sTsarTTKstasansrs: 



Your ''Joe College" Raiingl 

Record Chatrt Classifies 
Tastes o£ Williams Men 



By Phil Collins and Dix 

On April a LIFE magazine gave Its readers a clal structure of the U.lS^. Editor RussellN^es of 
chance to And out Just where they stood in the so- "Harper's Magazine" orlgWuy divided our <;ulture 



into three types, high-brow, nUddle-brow, and low- 
brow. "LIFE", to make sure that all levels got the 
general idea, prepared a chart of class tastes on 
which everyone might classify himself. 

To help its readers discover their places in cam- 
pus life, The Newspaper of Williams College has 
worked with cartoonist Dix White to prepare this 
three-level guidance chart for "Joe College." 

At the top, in the driver's seat, is the high-type, 
all-out. College Man, designated as "Yalle" after 
the institution which has always set the trends 
for his caste. Like LIFE'S hlgh-brbw, he is in the 
minority, but still manages to rule campus social 
activity. The true Yalle is a smooth Individual 
who puts his letter-sweater on back-to-front and 



inside-out, wears a »uspender-b«lt, and is never 
seen at a football game without his racccon-ikig 
coat and cocktail shaker. He decorates Ms room 
with bottles of Johnnie Walker's Red Label, uthle. 
tic equipment, and an unobtrusive prep .school 
banner. 

At the other end of the scale is the Nevei Left. 
High-School type. He has his own innocent piea. 
sures, and the Yalle disregards him except at 
voting. The Yalle's suave poise is sometimes lufQed 
however, by the activities of the middle grou; who 
prevented by finances or proper cultural api loacii 
from reaching the heights, are forever trying t, 
move in on his stock of dates and his d, q^i, 
hangouts. 



CLOTHES 



USEFUL 
OBJECTS 



DHINKS 



PLACfeS 
TO DATfc^ 



MAGAZINES 



PLACES 
TO WEEKEND 



SPORTS 



CARS 



LOCAL 
INSTITUTIONS 



""! 



CAUSES 



hk;h 

TYPE 



V A I.IK 



Town 

Groy flannel luit 
(naturol 
«hould«rt) 
Black knit »ia 
tgold tafaty pin) 



C ount ry 

Tw««d iocktt 
ToH«rial 

woiiteoat 
Fruit booti 
(whitt buckt) 
Golf cap 





ujuuuxjl 









Dunhill cJgor«tt« 
lighter 



Scorch and Soda 



N«w York City 
(abov* 42nd, 
balow lOthI 



"HoUdoy" 



Lo Ru« 



Skiing 



Convcrtiblt 



IIW HouM 




Sttittn For Praiidtn 



MIDDLK 



TKVINC 
IlAKl) 



Town Country 

Glen plaid suit Gl surplus 
Bow tio 
Argyles 






Saddle shoes 



Frat bttr mug 



Smith, Vossor, ttc. 




Th« Biltmort 



Golf 



^^^ 



Ford convortibU 





Th« Toconic 



Compulsory Chopal 



LOW 
TVPK 



NEVER 
LEFT 
HIGH 
SCHOOL 



1950 




4B 



Town 



Country 



Gobordint aiiit Two-tons iackat 

Splothy tl« T-ihirt 

Ltvis 
Snaaktri 



Williams bonntr 



S«a-Br«ti« 



w 




tsisunsisisi 




Bennington 



"Tht Purple Cow" 



The State Line 




Touch football 



jQSsib 



Indian motorcycle 





Cellefe Pharmacy 



5c bear 



Open Letter To All Juniors 



Unknown to a vast majority of the class of 1950, there was a 
class meeting over a week ago at which the Senior weekend of May 
13." 14 and 15. which is to be handled by our class, was discussed. 
Also a class dues of $ .50 per man was approved- This money will 
be used In part for the May 14 Junior-Senior beer picnic and also 
win be available for future parties and the like, which I hope we 
can have. The next meeting will be better publicized and I hope 
more men will be interested enough to attend. 
John C. Griggs 
President of Class of 1950 



Hitting The Flicks 

THREE GODFATHERS (Tonight) Never underestimate the power of 
a baby seems to be the gospel preached by this latest of technicol- 
ored westerns. We see a startling transformation in John Wayne, 
tough guy turned Milquetoast, who is the principal foil for said 
infant. And would you believe it? John gets the banker's daughter 
to wait for him while he does a short stretch for his crimes. Harry 
Carey Jr. and Pedro Armendariz fill out the terrible threesome, and 
are spared most of the sloppy switch since they are written out about 
the time John begins finding meaning In things. John Ford, who has 
directed some good ones, might well have turned this Into a slick 
satire, but somewhere along the line, his guns got plugged. 
THE ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN (Sun-Mon) Might well be en- 
titled The Adventures of Errol Flynn in Period Costume. Viveca Lind- 
fors has the lush part of a queen-with-proplem, and carries it off 
well, considering that her only help cometh from Flynn, a gentleman 
who may be long on the sex-appeal but is nobody's actor, or 
thinker. He gives his usual depth to the performance. In technicolor 
THE RAIDER (Tues) A repeat showing by popular demand. These 
days technlcolored epics are easy to come by. but anyone who misses 
this one has lost a great opportunity to see what a real-live cast and 
good script can do for color Alms. This is the story of merchant 
seamen adrift in a lifeboat, one that a German sub is following. In 
hopes that it will lure some unsuspecting merchantman within shoot- 
See FLICKS, page 4 



>oe^-.«e^d^ 




"«"i.«o»> 



UNDERGRADUATES APPRECIATE 

THE GENERALLY LOWER PRICES IN 

BROOKS BROTHERS' SIXTH FLOOR SHOP 

Cdliege men are amnn!.' iinioks Hnitliers' most 
enthusiastic fans, 'i'hey're especially p.irti.il to 
iiur Si.\th F'ldcir Shcip, which gives them typi- 
cal IJrcdks Brothers' (|ualit\ at generally lower 
prices. Wi- have wide selections assemhieil there 
...all reflecting the Quality and Good Taste for 
which lirooks Brothers are famous. 



KSTAatltHID 1«1* 




U6 MADI.SON AVENUE, COR. 44TH ST., NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

46 NEWBURY, COR. BERKELEY STREET, BOSTON 16, MASS. 

LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 




^tr« Millipig J^ot^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1 944, at the post office at 
North Adorns, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday ond Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Wiiliamstojwn, Telephone 72. 



Volume XUII 



APRIL 23, 1949 



Number 11 



ROSASCO'S TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

Air - Rail . But - Stunuhip 

TEL. 399 

90 Main Street North Ad.nw 



,An Amaxing Offar by 

HOLIDAY 

flxiPlpi •«»««Tttr«»otaf WMB-DANA,*, 
«**n>plp«.wldi hdgfcdrpoiMwi 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone; 883-M or 113) Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 ., ,. ' , ^..^ 

Norman S. Wood '50 Managing Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M of 33) News Editor 

1 Lansing G. Scofield '50 ... . . r- ,.. 

Walter P. Stern '50 Sports Editors 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Associate Editors: 195Q- H. Boker, S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson. 

/■;. . Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hostings. 

A' 1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Maclay, H. Pickord, E. Schur, W. 

^;,r Widing. 

T Jtoff Photographer John R. Kimberly 




ACOMIC 



SATURDAY 

John Wayne - Pedro Armendarii 

THREE GODFATHERS 

In Technicolor 
Footun 6:30 « 8:45 p.m. - 

SUN.-MON. April 24-25 

Errol Flynn 

DON JUAN 

Sun: 2:00 - 4:00 - 6:10 - 8:35 
Mon: 6:30 - 8:40 

TUIS. April 26 

All Star S«Q Story 

THE RAIDER 

7:10 . 9:05 
WID. April 27 



Young man with good connections 

IN a Bell telephone central office, this Western 
Electric installer is connecting thousands 
of wires to new equipment to provide more 
and better service. 

He's one of 18,000 trained Western Electric 
installers who do this job for Bell Telephone 
companies. Crews are working in some 1,600 
central offices to connect new equipment 
which, like your telephone, is made by 
Western Electric. 



• Western Electric la part of tlfe Bell SyMem-haa be«n 
since 1882. This assures closest cooperation between 
people who dengn telephone equipment, people who 
maJEe it and people who operate it Their teamwork ha* 
given this country the best telephone tervice on earth. 

Western Electric 



A UNIT OF THE BELL 



® 



SYSTEM SINCE 1lt2 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 1^49 



Lacrossemen 2 ackle Maroon 
At Springfield Ihis Afternoon 



Strong Foes To Give 

Ephs Close Struggle; 

Defeated MIT 11-8 



The Williams stlckmen will take 
to the fleld this afternoon against 
a rough Springfield College team 
ftt Springfield. This should be a 
tough contest for the Purple, who 
started slowly and were forced to 
come from behind to beat Union 

week ago. 

Springfield has done well this 
season, having beaten MIT 11-8, 
and lost to RPI 18-4. after play- 
ing an eyen first half. That would 
indicate that the Maroon Is a 
team with plenty of fight, and 
that they will give the Ephmen a 
close struggle. Williams won last 
year's encounter, 18-10. 

Strong WUUams Attack 

The Williams attack, . composed 
of Ed Maynard, Pat Graney, and 
Qordy McWllUams, proved that It 
lias plenty of punch last week 
when It scored eight of the eleven 
Williams goals. They will start 
this afternoon, with Cy Mayshark, 
Fiaser Moffat, Norm Wood, and 
Dave Van Alstyne in reserve. 

The starting midfield will pro- 
bably be Captain Austy Taliaferro, 
Phil Van Dusen, and Buzz Brum- 
baugh. Bobby Day, Ronnie Chute, 
Coke Scofleld, John Schluter, Gor- 
dy Clarke, and Dave Pynchon will 
be on hand to relieve them. 

The reliable defense of Howie 
Simpson, Bob Donoho, and Mark 
Reynolds will remain intact, with 
Dave Young, Charlie Arnold, and 



Golf Team Faces 
Hofstra Today 

Veteran Squad Ready 

For Season's Opener 

1 

Coach Dick Baxter's golf 
squad opens a schedule of ten 
dual matches pliis the New Eng- 
land Championships against Hof- 
stra College this afternoon at 2 
p. m. on the Taconic Links. With 
an experienced lineup teeing off, 
the golfers have the dlfflcult task 
of bettering last spring's fine rec- 
ord of seven wins, one loss, and 
one tie as well as fifth place in 
the New Englands. 

Baxter has not had an oppor- 
tunity to complete the elimina- 
tion rounds for team places, so he 
has picked six players on the 
basis of last year's showing to 
face the Plying Dutchmen in this 
match. 

Those lettermen competing are 
Captain Jerry Cole, Bucky Mar- 
chese. Chuck White, and Dick 
Heuer. Berry Smith and Bill Rod- 
ie, freshmian standouts last year 
fill the other two positions. The 
order of play has not yet been 
determined. Marchese has card- 
ed a 69 and a 73 his first two 
rounds on the local links this 
Spring. 



'52 Lacrosse 
Team Faces 
Mt. Hermon 



Seven Veterans, Four 

From Deerfield, Head 

Squad Of 28 Men 



Seven Purple 
Stickmen Cited 



Bill Coldwell as substituCes. Test- 
ed Mickey O'Connell will guard 
the nets with Phil Boote and Dave 
Fay jtS reserves. 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 



GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Marcella and Frank Ikeler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 



Tel. 302-M 
Williomstown 



Route 2 
Opposite Howard Johnsons 



m 



YOUR CHOICE 

OF 

FINE FOOD 

AND 

LIQUOR 



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Two miles from 
Williamstown 
On Route 7 



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OPEN TILL 1 



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PHONE 267 



With the first game coming up 
today, Coach Dick Whitney Is 
whipping his tyro freshman la- 
crosse team Into shape. 

Whitney, whose bad knee kept 
him from playing varsity lacrosse 
this spring, is faced with no easy 
task, as only seven of his twenty- 
eight man squad have played the 
game before^ There are, however, 
a good nupribev of 'hewcomers who 
are picking up the game rapidly. 
As yet, no definite positions have 
been afixed. 

Four From Deerfield 

Of the seven veterans, four are 
from Deerfield Academy. Ed 
Shudt, who hadn't picked up a 
stick before he played for Deer- 
field last year, was elected to the 
all-New England second team for 
his mid-fleld work. His speed and 
stick-handling ability will be. in 
all probability, used to bolster 
the attack. Also from Deerfield 
are defense-man Fete IngersoU 
and the mid-fielders Nell Chase 
and George Kinter. 

Jack Ordeman, an experienced 
player from Andover, has been 
using his weight and skill in the 
mid-fleld. Another ex-Andover 
player, Duke Curtis, will probab- 
ly be In there Saturday. 

One From Maryland 

Stephen Whittier, who former- 
ly played at St. Paul's School in 
Baltimore, has been the third man 
in the first attack, completing an 
experienced scoring trio. 

In the nets, newcomer Frank 
Weeks has proved his ability to 
pick up the game. He is backed up 
by John Sylvester. 

Aggressive New Players 

As a tentative defenseman, Dave 
Mills has shown great promise, 
during practice. Another aggres-'^ 
sive player, new to the game, is 
John Nelson, who^has been pliy- 
ing in a midfield slot. Speedy 
Jim Henry Is also inexperienced 
but Is showing some good work. 

Facing Mount Hermon here to- 
day, the freshman lacrosse team 
has three more scheduled games, 
with a possible practice game with 
the Harvard freshmen. They play 
Union here on May 14, R.P.I, a- 
way on May 18, and finish their 
regular schedule at Deerfield on 
May 25. 



New England Ten Lists 
Taliafe^rb, Meryman 



Seven members of the 1948 
WlUia^ns lacrosse team gained re- 
cognition in the All-New England 
team choices, as revealed in the 
United States Intercollegiate I<a- 
crosse Association's official guide 
for 1949. 

Captain Austy Taliaferro, an 
attackman made into a center 
midfielder last year, and Dick 
Meryman '48, high-scoring attack 
man of last year's ten, were on the 
first team, and Mickey O'Connell, 
the very capable goalie, and Bob 
Donoho, rugged defenseman, 
made the second team. 

Three Honorable Mention 

Last year's co-captains, and two 
of this year's strong attack, Ed 
Maynard and Pat Graney were 
cited for honorable mention. Mid- 
fielder Prenchy Oudin was also 
listed for honorable mention, al- 
though he was bothered some of 
the season by injuries. 

Williams was not without men 
in the All-Amerlcan choices, eit- 
her. Meryman, whom the Guide 
called the "best in New England", 
earned a position on the second 
attack. Graney won honorable 
mention. 

The Purple had more men listed 
for the All-New England team 
than any other college, although 
in league play the Ephs had to 
take runner-up honors to Dart- 
mouth. The Indians had four men 
on the first string, one on the sec- 
ond, one honorable mention. Yale 
had two men in each category. 



Williams Track Team Meets 
Strong RPI Outfit Saturday 



Wrestling, Swimming 
Admission Price Set 

It has been announced by 
the athletic office that an ad- 
mission charge of 60 cents will 
be made for all home varsity 
wrestling and swimming meets 
next year. Students will be ad- 
mitted free of charge upon 
presentation of their athletic 
cards. 

A similar charge has been 
standard policy at Amherst 
and Bowdoln for several years. 



Chaffee men Clash 
With Army Today 

Strong Squad Opposes 
Purple At West Point 




state Road 

Between Williamstown and 

North Adams 

Lunches Ice Cream 

Sandwiches 



Barney, Delany 
To Spark Team 

Seasoned Performers 

Strengthen Ephmen 



Army plays host to the Purple 
netmen today as the visitors seek 
their first win of the season a- 
gainst virtually the same team 
that they outstroked last year 6-3. 

Coach Chaffee, however, was 
doubtful of the outcome. Handi- 
capped by soggy courts, the Eph- 
men have been forced to practice 
on the pock-marked surface of 
the local circus grounds. The Ca- 
dets, on the other hand, have ex- 
cellent Indoor facilities and have 
been able to retain their form 
during the recent week of rain. 

Revised Lineup 

Joe Takamine has taken over 
the number six spot in the Eph 
lineup, while Dick Palmer and 
Bud Treman form the new third 
doubles team. Otherwise, the line- 
up will be the same as in the 
Princeton meet, with Robinson. 
Schaaf, Scribner, Palmer, and 
Thurber the first five men on the 
singles ladder. The Scribner- 
Schaaf and Robinson-Thurber 
duos fill the first two doubles 
spots. 

Headed by Charlie Oliver, past 
New England singles champion 
and also ace of their squash team, 
the West Pointers present a line- 
up changed since 1948 only by the 
loss of their number two man Do- 
ugherty. In recent matches, Ar- 
my has trounced Swarthmore 9-0 
and bowed to Harvard 5-4. 



FOR RENT — new, fhree room oport- 
ment with ottached garage, in South 
Williamstown, ovoilable July I. 
Reasonable. Telephone 693M3. 




By Ted Jones 

Berkshire track and field en- 
thusiasts will get their first of- 
ficial glimpse of Coach Tony 
Plansky's' 1949 Williams track ■ 
team this Saturday when the Pur- 
pie thlnclads open the season a- 
gainst a formidable RPI outfit at 
Troy. Agatost Williams the eng- 
ineers will field a team which has 
lost only two meets in five seasons. 
Broke 440 Record 

The Troy trackmen are led by 
crack middle-distance man Bund- 
schuh, who last year broke a 
twenty-four year old track record 
for the 440 yd run in the RPI- 
Williams meet at Williajnstown. 
In addition the 'RPI ace holds 
school records in both the 100, 
220, 440 and 880. The engineers 
are almost equally as strong in the 
dashes, sprinters Markson and 
Avery carrying the RPI burden In 
the 100 and 220 events. 

According to the Rensselaer 
Poly, the hurdling prospects for 
the cherry and white "look es- 
pecially good." Bray is the RPI 
standout in the hurdle events, a 
double winner against Williams 
last spring, Scott, Ruete, and 
Frankenfieid who holds the RPI 
pole vault record of 12'2", ail re- 
turn in this event and will att- 
empt to duplicate the clean sweep 
which these same three made a- 
gainst the Ephs last year. 

Two more record holders, Avery 
and Andrews, give the engineers 
exceptional strength in the high 
jump. Both boys are S'll" jump- 
ers. Weak spots In the RPI lineup . 
are the broad jump and distance 
runs, where a lack of experienced 
performers ftas provided a big 
stumbling block all Spring. 

Williams Well Balanced 

Coach Plansky, in spite of the 
formidable opposition scheduled 
for the opening meet, feels extrem- 
ely confident that the Ephmen 
will be able to duplicate their up- 
set victory of 1947 and at the 
same time erase the memory of 
last season's 68-58 loss to the eng- 
ineers. And he has good reason for 
feeling hopeful, for Williams, 
strengthened by needed additions 
from a fine 1948 frosh squad, ap- 
pears to be a much better balan- 
ced team than last year's team. 

Barney and Delany seem to be 
sure winners Saturday. These two 
standout returnees from last 
year's team have been tabbed as 
two of the finest njnners in New 
England. In addition to Delany 
In the distance events and Bar- 
ney in any one of six events which 
he can do, Plansky is couriting on 
Maxwell, Ben Read, Fred Smith, 
and Pete Andrews In the hurdles 
See TRACK. Page 4 




UCAUSI THEY PRErAKED FOR 

SMOOTH VACATION DRtVINO WITH OUR 

Vticuthn Speehi 

• ad|ust brakes 
« adjust clutch 

• check steering . 

• tune engine 

• inspect electrical 

system 

• lubrication 

• inspect tires 




HERBERT A. ORR CO. 

Ciirran Highway 
Nertfc Adami, Man. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURPAYp7SP?:IL 23. 1949 




RELIABLE SERVICE 

,Mv' our lilt of Rtgular 
WHIioms Cuitomart at . . 

:rronick's 

lEsso Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 



-* 



FOR SALE 

"NEWSPAPER" 
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN A 
NEWSPAPER CAREER? 
Here is a going business! 
A MONEYMAKER I 
A weekly in Boston dreo recog- 
nized leading paper in its field. 
COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 
Linotypes, Caster, Ludlow 
GOSSWEB PRESS 
^PRICE - - - $41,500 
Inq^ies to be sent to the 
'Uncord Office 

'^. ^ 



Juniors • • • 

Sage Hall Courts; Freshman ten- 
nis with Harvard at 2:30; and 
Freshman lacrosse with Union, 
2:30 on Cole Field. 

,lwu a«Mlon 

Under thfe ^direction of Pro- 
fessor Roy LamSoQ, Jr. and Wal- 
ter L. Oleson '49, t^e WCA Is 
sponsoring a prograni^ of "Jazz 
at Jesup" that night at 8. Among 
the musicians are Prof. Lamso^ 
clarinet; Wally Oleson, piano; 
John H. Marvin '50, saxaphone; 
-^thur L. Singer 'SO, guitar; Wil- 
liam. M. Partington Jr. '60, piano; 
Leonard O. Blumenschlne Jr. '50, 
Harry Loul?, possibly Sidney 
Welrkman '48>^d "Peaoh-Plt" 
Pearson. Muslciail^from th«; two 
dance bands will be invited to join 
In the jam session. ^ 

Individual social units will be 
holding dances Saturday nlght.^ 
the event of rain, the formal 
dance will take place in Lasel 
Oym. 




dAC Rules 




a permanent glass-covered bulle- 
tin board ' outside, the Spring 
Stfeet entrance to the Lasell Oym.' 



Auer 



Why wait until 
morning? '/ 

When you can get /the oUtr 
standing news of the day every 
evening through ^e full leased 
wire Associated/Press service In 

J&\\t ^ratiBrript 

N^rth Adams, Moss. 

On sole at 5 p.m. on all 

/Williomstown Nevnstonds 



pens to beTengaged in for many 

yeaj» \' -^ , 
I "Mi. Auer himself started its an 
ifflce boy, which, he said, y/as a 
great advantage to him for Jt en- 
abled him to learn something a- 
bout each aspect of the publishing 
business, about such difi'erent de- 
partments as editorial, research, 
advertising and advertising pro- 
motion, piiblic relations, office 
maii&gement, production, and fi- 
nance, tio matter what his Inter- 
rests, £uiyone«entering the field of 
publishing can ib)A some branch 
of the business that, apipeals to 
him, ""-v. 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



STEELE and WILES 
GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 

BODY and FENDER WORK 

MOTOR OVERHAULING 

Telephone 499-M 

Williomstown 



41 
Spring St. 



Moss. 



Flicks - . - 



Ing distance. A ship arrives, and 
the sub surfaces to give battle, 
one which for realism and sus- 
pense is something to see. 
DINNER AT THE RITZ (Weds) 
This is an English import, re- 
putedly quite good, and starring 
Annabella and David Niven, both 
of whom ought to be familiar e- 
nough to American audiences. 
With Paul Lukas, and an assort- 
ment of stylish dinner wear. 
THE ACCUSED (Thurs-Fri-Sat) 
This picture is the epitome of the 
psychological mystery thriller, 
Loretta Young gives a great pft- 
formance as a teacher who is 
more or less forced to kill one of 
her students when he gets amor- 
ous to the point of force. Wendell 
Corey plays the dectectlve and 
shares the distinction of falling In 
love with Loretta with Robert 
Cummings, the deceased's guard- 
ian. 



. .V.WW%WVWiVA%^WWS/W^VWA».SS%V 



3 leading questions 



Q. What is "Fenway"? 

A. Name of a Boston ball 
park . . . also one of Arrow's 
famous button-down oxfords. 



Q. Wfiaf if "Sussex"? 

A. Name of a British county 
. . . also Arrow's famous wide- 
spread collar oxford shirt. 




Army 



I Students 



\ The FUher BUit 
It happened in the eighth. An 
error and another Seller single 
put men on first and third and 
pinch hitter Tom Healy came 
through with a double to set the 
stage for a single by Shay Lynch 
and a ^lld heave by the third 
sucker. Then with two outs, three 
runs in, and a mairi oh base F^et 
^ove the first pitct) High oy^ 
the^eft centerfleld fence for a 
nome^^d Williams runs^Aumber 
seven and^elght. Oweii singled 
but a new Army piteher and an 
old Army rule eh^^ hopes of an 
upset. 

^ H E 

WUllams / 20000106 8"X2 
Army / 0042310x10 10> 



Rumor has it that swimming 
coacli Qob Muir may get "into 
the act" as barker. Al Perry, 
local businessman, is general 
chairman for the-^show and will 
also act as rlngmaster^^The price 
Is only $1, so the Rotarlans are 
hopeful of achieving their goal. 



French playwright MoUere, "I« 
Malade Imaglhalre"' is noted for 
its high comedy Which at times 
assuihes the prc^portions of a farce 
and particularly for its sharp sa- 
tire upon^ the pedantic medical 
profes^n of the writer's day. 
Alttioiigh the main source of hu- 
mor arises from the action con- 
'cernlng the Imaginary invalid 
himself, a romantic love plot In- 
volving Mary Joslyn as Angellque 
and Borgle Dannfelt as the lover 
Cleante, serves to further enhance 
the comedy. To defray costume 
costs, the group is charging an 
admission price of thirty-five 
cents. 



^ack • ■ - 

and oh JEelton and Cook in the 
two mile &ti|it. Marty Detmer Is 
the outstandl^^entry among se- 
ven who will represent the Purple 
In the weights. Scotijr ~^ooks is 
a two event man in the lOO and 
broad jump. Edwards will coni- 
pete in both* the javelin and dis- 
cus events. 



Q. What is "Brockly"? 







A. Bfoccoiris a vegeta6IS.Vi ^ 
also Brockly Is Arrow's regular 
collar oxford shirt. 



Ask your Arrow dealer for Arrow Oordon Oxfords . . . $3.95 

ARROW 

SHIRTS and TIES . 

UNDERWEAR • HANDKERCHIEFS • SPORTS SHIRTS 
JWA 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and pronnpt 

repair service 




~i 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adomi 




PLAY GOLP 

ThU Spring. 
<iolf Iqwipnwnt by 

MacSragor 
PadtrMii Jj 
Spalding 



4\ 



Tacoitic Golf Course 

GENEROUS ALLOWANCE ON YOUR USED CLUIS. 
LIMITED SUPPLY OF SECOND HAND CLURS. 

Inttruction by oppointmant from 
DICK lAXTIR 



WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS 
FOR THE NEW 



1949 




CONVERTIBLES AND STATION WAGONS 
■ FOR EARLY SPRING DELIVERY. 

HARRY SMITH, IncQrporated 

North Adorns \ 

\^ 

yoMr FORD and MERCURY doaltr 




4 spemL oFfm 

TO THE GRADUATING CLASS . . . JUNE '49 




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You M«y te Accepteil for ni Early 

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and 26V4 and physically and morally quolHM, ywi may bo oecoplx 
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You g^ a well-planned court*, valued al ^35,000 . . . Hil. Indudoi obou 
275 hcu.s of Wflhi iroinlng, and tho flnost aviation MlwcaMon andoxocu 
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Win your wings ond then start a career with a futura... 



College men are today's leaders of the U. S. Air 
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As a college graduate you will have an unlimite 
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It's a year of learning, flying and time for recreatioi 
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Upon asdgmnent to an Aviation Cadet class yoi 
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Ouring this training period you'll find plenty o. 
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U. S. ARMY sad U. S. AIR fORCE RECRUITING SERVICE 



single er meiried men wHh twe years of college (or who coik 
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Voiurne XLIII, Number 12 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




Price 10 cents 



WilUams Glee Club, Wellesley 
Choir To Give Joint Concert 



Critics Praise Previous 

Engagements Of Club; 

Program Announced 



Singing In WUliamstown for the 
first and only time this yeat, the 
WlUlams Olee Club will present 
a Joint concert with the Wellesley 
College • Choh- this da^turday eve- 
ning, April 30; in Cbapin Hall. 

Out-of-town comment concer- 
ning Olee Club concerts thi« sea- 
son has been unusually favorable. 
Menry liilshkln, director of the 
Amherst Glee Club, commenting 
on the recent broadcast by YTH- 
llams over the NBC New |:ngland 
Network, wrote: "an '^excellent 
program- and an excellent con- 
cert." Ruth Tripp, music critic of 
"The Providence Evening Jour- 
nal" wrote that there was an "un- 
usually well-balanced volume of 
tone... clear diction and neatly 
finished phrases. . .the kind of 
singing which one remembers for 
days." "The Springfield Republi- 
can" commented on the "rich to- 
nal blend" and the "trufe musica- 
llty" of the Williams men. Mr. E. 
Harold Qeer, head of the Vassar 
Music Department, wrote that 
"from the standpoint of tone qua- 
lity, intonatiqn and balance. It is 
the best men's group we have had 
on the Vassar campus in many 
years." 

"WUllamslana" Included 

Of special interest to the stu- 
dent body will be Professor Bar- 
row's arrangement of "When I 
See You", one of the songs from 
the recent student musical "All 
'niat Olltters" by Stephen Sond- 
helm' The Williams part of the 
program will also Include the pop- 
ular "WlUlamslaRa'^^ Mr. Barrow's 
new fantasy on Williams songs. 
The Club will also sijng Douglas 
Moore's "Simon Legree" and Pal- 
estrina's "Tenebrae Factae Sunt". 

The Wellesley Choir will pre- 
sent, among others, two selec- 
tions with texts from Lewis Car- 
roll's "Alice In Wonderland", by 
the contemporary American com- 
poser Irving Pine. The two num- 
bers to be given are the amusing 
"You Are Old Father WlUlam" 
and "The" Lobster Quadrille." 

The combined choruses, num- 
See WELLESLEY, Page 4 

UWF Chooses 
New Officers 



Frosh, Sophs Plan 

Class Beer Picnic 

■The Freshman - Sophomore 
beer picnic will be held on low- 
er Cole Field on May 14 at 12 
noon. The picnic will follow a 
rope pull between the two 
classes, if a rope of sufSclent 
strength can be found. There 
will be beer foy, all present, 
and there l^a possibility of 
further iriter-class activity. 
Class Committees, under fresh- 
man president J. Richard Duf- 
fleld and soph president Robert 
Oeniesse, are working on final 
arrangements. 



VC Approves 
Rushing Rules 

Post-Season Regulations, 
Quotas Also .Passed 



The rushing system at Williams 
underwent further alteration 
Monday night when the UC pass- 
ed the new penalty'for ^Irty rush- 
ing, set up new quota system, and 
changed several pf^Uie JWstr^-; 
son rushing rules. "* 

As proposed at the UC meeting 
last week, the fine of $100-$300 
for dirty rushing was passed. In 
regard to the quotas, all houses 
may take fourteen freshmen next 
fall, regardless of the size of their 
house. If, with that number of 
freshmen in the house, the house 
See UC, Page 4 




^AU The King'^ Men' Actingnr; 
Praised; Production Panned 



Dance In 'Heir 
Tops Weekend 

Square Dancers^AMT^ 



Audience Invade Club 



Attired in football helmet, jumping booti, and two parach|lte>, Don 
Pugh ihakes hondl with hit pilot and jumping instructor, Rolph Voorhis, 
before his bet-winning first jump lost Sunday. 

Student's Parachute Jump 

Thrills Crowds Wins Bet 



Pugh's First Leap 
Fullfills Old bream 



Carrington, Curtis, Ellis 
Named To Positions 



Robert Carrington '51 was elect- 
ed chairman of the WilUams 
chapter of the United World Fed- 
eralists at an election meeting 
Wednesday evening in OrifOn 
Hall. Carrington who has been 
serving as vice-chairman in charge 
of field service, succeeds Dick 
Qoodman '49, who will graduate 
in June. 

Edward Curtis '51 was elected 
vice-chairman In charge of field 
organizing, and David Ellis '51, 
vice-chairman In charge of col- 
lege activities. Other newly elect- 
ed ^chapter o£Bcers are: Robert 
Mill '61, executive secretary; Al- 
fred Schlosser '51, secretary; and 
Chris Wright '60, treasurer. 
Six DiTlaions 

The above six men will meet 
this week, at which time they will 
appoint six additional men to the 
executive committee to head the 
following divisions: Ftmd Rais- 
ing, Rural Areas, Schools, Home 
Meetings, Churches, and Service 
Clubs. Phil Cool? '61 and Jack 
Lurid '51 have already been ap- 
pointed chairmen of publicity 
and: Political Action, respectively. 

Th.e Williams College chapter, 
which now has a membership of 
140; has been given the Job of ad- 
ministering half of the national 
student political action program, 
See DWF, Page 2 



Sunday afternoon, the ruin of 
many a houseparty, took on a new 
quality of excitement last week- 
end as 300 thrill seekers gather- 
ed at the North Adams air- 
field to watch a paracrute jump 
by novice Dan Pugh '50. Pugh, a 
member of Sigma Phi, made the 
Jump to satisfy an old ambition 
and, incldeiitally, to collect $39 
in bets. His expenses, however 
totalled $30. 

The crowd was kept waiting 
tensely almost two hours for the 
arrival of Ralph E. Voorhls, CAA 
licensed parachute rigger and In- 



ISew'Comment' 
Jo Hit Stands 



Features War Account 
By Professor Bums 



The spring issue of the college 
literary mfigazine, "Comment", 
will be published during the sec- 
ond week of May. It will be the 
final issue of the year. 

The feature article in this Is- 
sue is one by Prof. James M. 
Bums, called "Military Person- 
nel in the South Pacific". The 
story presents a true account of 
the service rivalries In the South 
Pacific, from a man who was a 
first-hand observer. 

Variety M Material 

The fiction of the spring "Com- 
ment" contains "The Shadowy 
Place" by Robert Taylor '49, a 
dynamic study of a man's inner 
life; "Journe^ Without End" by 
Joseph Dewey '61, a story con- 
cerning the thoughts and impres- 
sions of a twisted mind in the 
stream-of -consciousness t e c h- 
nique; and "Dust of the Earth", 
a story of a young man who 
chose to walk alone, by Albert 
See 'COMMENT', Page. 2 



structor from Northampton, who 
had charge of Pugh's training and 
flew trie plane from which he 
Jumped. 

No Encouragement 

Voorhls, himself a veteran of 
698 Jumps, has been teaching for 
nineteen years. He has had only 
one accident in flfty-flve students. 

But these encouraging reports 
were of little value to Pugh once 
he was in the air. The conditions 
of the original bet stated that all 
encouragement and pep talks were 
to end once the plane was ofl the 
ground. Commimlcation between 
Pugh and his pilot was limited to 
a tap on the shoulder at the cor- 
rect moment for the Jump. All in- 
struction requirements of the CAA 
however were followed to the 
letter. 

Terms of the bet also stipulated 
that Pugh should be allowed only 
two nms over the field to get up 
his nerve, and that he should be 
completely sober. As take-oft time 
approached, it was hard to visua- 
lize him In any other condition. 
See PARACHUTE, Page 2 



A "Hell" of a time at the Gar- 
field Club late Saturday evening 
topped oft activities on the Wil- 
liams campus last weekend. 

Featuring a "chute to Hell" as 
the main method of entering the 
Currier lounge, the "HeUish" 
theme of the Informal dance was 
brought out by red lights, a fum- 
ing dry ice "fire", and a variety 
of masks strategically placed. 

Couples entering the dance were 
forced to slide down the chute 
Into the "depths of Hades," which 
were hidden from the eyes of the 
world above by a blanket hung 
above the chute. Once inside, they 
were treated to entertainment by 
the Purple Knights and the Ben- 
nington Octet. Set-ups and pota- 
to chips were served In the train- 
ing and language room off the 
main dining room. 

Other Activities 

While the Club dance lasted 
from 10 until 2, many of the 
weekenders took advantage of o- 
ther entertainment opportunities 
and did not arrive until the party 
was well under way. Many from 
the capacity crowd witnessing 
the Adams Memorial Theatre 
production "All The King's Men" 
relaxed from the Intense atmos- 
phere of the tragedy by taking 
part in the festivities in Currier. 
. Many Williams men and their 
dates enjoyed the Williams Out- 
ing Club square dance in La- 
Salle Gymnasium. The WOC Im- 
ported girls from Bennington and 
Holyoke as partners for dateless 
Williams men. 



Jeffries Win 
Bridge Honors 

Tie For 2nd In 
Intercollegiates 



Debaters To Face 
• Seven Colleges 

To Discuss Education, 
Communists, A-Bomb 



A heavy schedule of debates 
with seven different colleges, in- 
cluding a New England Tourna- 
ment at Dartmouth, comprises 
the Adelphic Union agenda for 
lhe,^otnlng_.weeta. SjxtMn W 
liams men will participate. , 

In the first of the series, Don- 
ald Sanford '51 and Daniel Com- 
lskey'^'62 will debate Holy Cross 
at Worcester, defending the neg- 
ative side of the statement, "Re- 
solved that the Communist Party 
be outlawed," on the evening of 
Friday, April 29. 

On the -same night, Amherst 
will come her^ for a debate with 
Oiles Kelly '49 and Richard BUd- 
See . ADEIfmc, Page 2 



Stack^ Gushee Performances 

lake Honors In Warren Play 

' ■ \^ 

by Robert Scott Taylor 
-— '^'jFhe perfprmance^ of "All te e^iHng-'B--Men' ' i n ■ th e.AMT last week- 
end contained without question some of the most mature and most 
sensitive acting that has appeared on this campus for a long, long 
time. It might be wished however (one does have a right to wish) 
that the production end of the play had been regarded with less hasty 
condescension and more Imaginative experimentation than that with- 
which the AMT Hierarchy saw fit to regard it. The play may be a 
great idea, but It certainly is not a great play as it stands; a little 
Ingenuity would have helped. 

. ■ o The quality of the acting, at 

times most impressive, was a- 
chleved in spite of interminable 
periods of darkness when music 
sometimes did and sometimes did 
not blare, while the audience 
waited for one small midget to 
laboriously change the scenery all 
by himself; In spite of the light- 
ing which did a striking job of 
obliterating the features of the 
actors; in spite of the chorus 
which huddled like an old corpse 
in a remote comer of the stage, 
hollering unmodulated irony in 
the tone of a football cheer; In 
spite of the Professor and the As- 
sistant who kept Jostling each 
other in front of the chorus like 
little boys standing in line for a 
movie. 

Hotel Scene Marvelous 
In spite of all these things (this 
was Friday night — perhaps Sat- 
urday was smoother Edward 
Stack (Governor Stark) and Ed- 
ward Gushee, Jr. (Tiny Duffy) 
contributed performances which 
were penetrating and mature, al- 
together fresh and exciting. 

The hotel room scene in the 
first act was marvelous; Govemor 
Stark's quiet despotic control. Ti- 
ny Duffy's cringing parasitism, the 
small-timers' craven awe before 
the Big Boss, the cigar-and-whis- 
key atmosphere of the politico's 
bedroom — It was all there and 
all good. A later moment in the 
second Act when Stark shouts at 
his ex-wlfe that their son is HIS 
son, not hers, then bursts out 
laughing — It was as fine a piece 
of acting and as bone-chilUng a 
moment generally as one is likely 
to find in the theatre any time. 
Feminine Roles More Difficult 
The other male leads, Arthur 
Levitt, Jr. (Professor of Surgery) 
and Gilbert Mason (Doctor Adam 
Stanton) were Jess outstanding 
because they fa* ;d to convince 
one that they lmev> .precisely what 
they were talking about. This is 
partly the fault of the play, much 
too full of foam and pretense, and 
partly the fault of the actors 
and/or directors who seem to have 
made inadequate effort to analyze 
See 'KING'S MEN' Page 2 



Successfully matching aces with 
the best collegiate card players 
In the country, Louis Jeffrey '50 
and his brother Richard '52 tied 
for second with Carlton College 
last weekend in the National In- 
tercollegiate Duplicate Bridge 
Tourney at Chicago. 
Sixteen teams from all sections of 
the country participated In the 
tournament. Including a pair of 
Negroes from Howard University, 
a forty year old prelaw student 
from Washburne College, and two 
women's teams, one from Skid- 
more and the other from Women's 
College of North ' Carolina. The 
Women finished fifteenth and 
sixteenth, with U. of Michigan 
taking top honors. 

Wolf, Vogler Qualify 

Another Eph duo, Roger Vog- 
ler '50 and William Wolf '50, 




Snookums, the versotile Himalayon Wonder-Beor, rides a 1 2-foot bike 
around the ring under the tutelage of Emit Pollenburg. 



Lively Williamstown Rotary Big Top 
Features Varied, Talented Performers 



by Frank Reiohe 

Old Jupiter Pluvius frowned 
on Williamstown last Saturday, 
but his frown soon turned to ex- 
pressions of glee on the happy 
faces of those 1800 kiddies and 
grownups alike who attended the 
Rotary Circus in the tiaseball cage. 
Organized by the Rotary Club to 
raise funds for uniforms for the 
Williamstown High School Band, 
the circus netted receipts of morp 
than $2000, the goal set for this 
project. 
Many gaily-colored IfSIfopns 



0- 



crowd with such antics as rowing, 
roller skating, playing the saxo- 
phone and accordion, and riding 
a 12-foot bike around the flng. 
He climaxed his activities with a 
motorcycle drive amid the "ohs" 
and "ahs" of the appreciative on- 
lookM-s. 

Trampoliner Hurt 
Other imported acts included 
the trampollng team of Munroe 
and Grant, a father-son combina- 
tion. Their half-comedy, ■ half- 
skilled routine was well received 
during the first show, but Just at 



were in evidence following the the finish of their seeond perfor- 
bpeHngTSarade as a ^fedomlnffil- I ffi^^ GfaHt, the father, caught 
ly young crowd witnessed the his leg on the comer of their 
first of four performances which ' steel apparatus and fell to the 
were highlighted by the Parker j ground. His severe gash required 
Brothers, a well-coordinated turn- fourteen stitches, thus preventing 
bling duo, and "Snookums", the him from participating in the two 
versatile Himalayan Wonder Bear evening shows, 
trained .by Emil Pallenburg, for- Mendoza's Aero- Marvel Dogs 
mWly with Rlngling Brothers' were in the middle of their iltt 
Bamum and Bailey Circus. The when a stray pooch wsmdered on 
Parkers were wildly applauded tor. the scene and nearly caused a 
their amazing display of strength riot. ?eace was restored only when 
while "Snookums" amused theT>- See BIO TOP, Page 2 



Case Of Missing 
Case Still Baffling 

Thirsty Prowler Robs 
Square Deal Of Liquor 

A thirsty prowler entered the 
Square Deal Store on Spring 
Street Thursday night and reliev- 
ed the inventory of a case of li- 
quor. 

When the store was opened Fri- 
day morning, the glass In the back 
door was found broken and the 
bars had been bent to allow the 
bootlegging thief to pass his 
hand through the hole and unlock 
the door. ■ — — r 



Either from inexperience or haste, 
the intruder slashed his hand on 
the Jagged glass ahd left a bloody 
trail as he moved around the 
storeroom. He did not, however, 
enter the main part of the store, 
making It appear that the cttfe 
of whiskey was his onljj objective, 
On Saturday Chief Royal com- 
mented briefly that, as yet, noth- 
ing has been done about the miss- 
ing case. 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 1949 






f tr« WiUii^^ 3aje£orje^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Willigmstown, Massochusetts 



"Entered as seconcf-closs matter November 27, 1944, at the post offlcf ot 
North Adorns, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb ar^d Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday ond Soturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Wiiliomstown, Telephone 72. 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 IPhone: 883-M or 1 1 3 )— . r t.; .TTTTTTTTTTTTTT^Editor 

Herbert P. Mohring '50 ,, . c^;,„„ 

Norman S. Wood '50 '^°"°9'"9 Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981-M or 331 News Editor 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 c-n,*, CAttnr^ 

.., ,, ^ri c* 'en Sports bditors 

Walter P. Stern 50 .. '^ 

William R., Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Bolter, S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B, Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hostings. 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. . 
Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 



Volume XLIII 



APRIL 27, 1949 



Number pz 



Fairer Rushing 

Now that the UC has taken one step toward making rushing 
fairer for all groups, that of abolishing prowling and giving every 
freshman a first bid to every house, we suggest another move which 
will help achieve the same goal. It is that all houses should obtain 
from Hopkins Hall accurate information on all incoming freshmen. 

As the situation stands at present, houses receive information 
on many men, but much of this either is pure rumor, tells what he 
was like two years ago when someone knew him vaguely in prep 
school, or is in the form of a courtesy letter from a business associate 
of the boy's father. In any case, much of it is unreliable and swings 
little weight during the hack sessions. 

But not only are these testimonies inaccurate; they unavoidably 
throw the odds in favor of the student who has the most friends 
already at Williams or whose father has the most pull. The man who 
didn't prep in the East and who knows few men in Williams or 
connected with it never gets an even break. 

With the new rushing system, these unknowns won't get elim- 
inated in prowling, but they will be handicapped in the amount of 
consideration they get at each house. With each rusher having to 
have an opinion on some 250 rushees, the pre-rushing dope is liable 
to mean more than it has in the past, so this should be accurate and 
of equal quantity for each man. 

Mr. Copeland is the man who can give this accurate information 
on just what each man has that got him into Williams. He could 
do this in an informal question period meeting with all the rushing 
chairmen. This has been done in the past and is done in a limited 
way each year for several houses which go to him for the information 
The application flies are. of course, confldential, but there is no 
reason for Mr. Copeland to conceal the reason why he thinks a man 
is good enough to be here at Williams. 



In this way the high school student would be on even term< 5^^^^*^^Xy"i "^'^ ">°"'^y '" ^^^ thousand 



with the prep schooler because pre-rushing information would be 
had on all groups regardless. It would assist the admissions office 
in their difficult task of drawing high school students to Williams. 
We firmly believe that, if all the facts about an individual were known, 
95% of the men good enough to get into Williams would be classiflgd 
as good fraternity material, so such a plan would not operate to 
prejudice the chances of "poor" fraternity material. 



The Clipboard 



ON THE WAGON— In Wakefield, Mass. there is a $10 prize for any 
youth who swears of! drinking or smoking, but there haven't been any 
takers for the past five years. Back in 1883 an ardent teetotaler and 
anti-smoker put up $1000 to be distributed to those kids who could 
prove they had passed up the two vices for five years. With Interest 
added, the fund is now up to $1673'. 52, but it is a big headache for 
the town. For lack of takers ,they can't give it away, and they can't 
use it for anything else. ' 

COWED FEMALES— In an issue celebrating the Communists' Inter- 
national Women's Day, "Trud", publication of the Russian trade 
unions, tried to show that women in the United States were so beaten 
down they were forced to turn to alcohol. Trud quoted a New York 
newspaper as having said there were 600,000 female alcoholics in this 
counti-y. V 

PAJAMAS— According to a nation-wide poll conducted by the De- 
partment of Agriculture, 47* of the men in the United States do not 
own pajamas. They all wear underwear, however. 



Waiting For The 'Chule 




Part of the anxious crowd of over 300 thrill-seekers who lined the 
North Adams airstrip Sunday to watch Pugh jump. 



Parachute 



predetermined spot over the field 
at an altitude of about 2000 feet, 
Pugh felt the tap on his shoulder. 
The wager was made almost a jjg (.iosg(j ^is eyes and jumped, 
month ago by a fraternity brother .j-j^g j^gj tj,g p^^g^ j,eard was the 
of Pugh's to stop what he consid- ^^^^g of his- pupil howling the se- 
ered to be an idle boast. But on ^^^^^ before he pulled the rip 
Sunday afternoon he was at the ^o^d, "Ooooone thousand, two 



pocket. 

Elaborate Preparations 

Elaborate preparations preced- 
ed the final climactic leap. In add- 
ition to AROTC movies and his 



Landing Perfect 

A murmur of "there he goes" 
swept along the spectators who 
lined the runway. There was a 
moment of dead silence as the bo- 



Bridge - 



other instruction, Pugh had been ^jy fp], f^ee, followed by cheers at 

training religiously with daily the appearance of the parachute. 

practice jumps oft a platform on ^he rest of the jump went ac- 

the twenty-five hands they were Weston Field to strengthen his cording to form. Pugh was carried 

dealt, the Jeffreys played brill- "=S=- °" ^"'"P "^^^ ^^ ^°''^ J^^P" by a 16 mile-an-hour wind to the 

„ , , . , er's boots over an expert ankle- oonth end of the field where he 

iantly on Saturday, making up for . . . u u «, i d „ i,i wnere ne 

tapmg j;>b by Mark Reynolds, landed with near-perfect style, 

a slow start which had left them j^^^^ jdacArthur supplied a pic- john BrinckerhofI was ready to 

in eighth place Fridey night. Louis turesque football helmet to com- ^gip him collapse the 'chute while 

Jeffrey, appearing for the third plete the outfit. the crowd streamed out from the 

straight time, is the only player ' Additional delays were involved hanger to congratulate their hero. 

went in their place finished sixth who has ever gone to the tourna- '" ^'^"^^ statements absolving p^g^ piayed his part to pertec- 

went m tneu place nnisnec sixtn. , ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^. ^j, ^j^^ ^.^^ throughout the afternoon's 

field from any liability, and in re- proceedings. Confident, yet mo- 
moving the right door from Voor 



qualified for the tournament by 
placing second in New England in 
the qualifying round, but a tour- 
nament rule prohibits two teams 
coming from the same school. The 
team from Clark University which 



Taking "top board" on four of ' ment two years in a row. 



'King's Men' 



and interpret the words. As a re- 
sult, in the case of the Stanton 
role, the only characteristic of 
the man which is adequately con- 
veyed is the unreflected upon re- 
vulsion, while the less sensational 
element — his truly moral dilem- 
na — slips by relatively unnoticed. 
It is more difficult to figure out 
the feminine roles. I think that 
Robert Penn Warren is less skil- 
ful, less precise, when writing of 
women, than when he writes of 
men. Anne Stanton, played by 
Mariam Rouse, was the most im- 
portant part — and also the most 
obscure. Mariam Rouse did well 
to perform adequately. She was 
particularly good in the first act 
with Adam, when her lines were 
almost entirely verse. Francis 
Chaffee also did well, though not 
sensationally. The best part of her 
characterization was the element 
she expressed of resignation, of 
trampled-down pride which would 
be the natural result of trying to 



live with Willy Stark. Least satis- '"""'"b "« ..b".- "w» ..^.,. . dest, as he lit up a cigarette in the 

factory of the women was Cathy ^'^' P'^"''' ^^^ Preparations were waiting room after the jump, he 

Munger (Sadie Burke) who tailed 1"^"^ completed, the Piper plane nved up to the crowd's conception 

somehow, to make it credible that '''" ^^^ e™""'* followed by the of what a dare-devil should be. 



she was strong enough or impor- 
tant enough to be the confiden- 
tial secretary of Governor Stark 



anxious eyes of the crowd. At a 
few minutes after 4 p.m. Pugh 
stepped out on the strut after a 



the woman who made him Preliminary practice run 
what he was." | 

Some of the bit players deserve 
favorable mention : Thomas Brit- . 
tingham, 3rd (Al Suggs), Howard 
Erskine (Jack). Robert Kim- 
brough, 3rd (Football Playen. 
Llewellyn White (Gummy Satter- 
fleld), and Joseph McElroy, Jr. 
(Crooner) — they all were good. 
They were very much what they 
should have been. 

It did not surprise anyone that 
Erskine's performance, particular- 
ly, would have been excellent on Ringmaster Alton Perry chased 
any stage. I should like to say, by the jealous stranger away. 



Hero's Acclaim 

North Adams radio station 

WMNB added its praises to the 

public acclaim by giving news of 
Record Covers Leap 

Also in the air at the same time I "^e jump precedence over the fall 

of Nanking on a Sunday night 
news broadcast. They stated that 
it was the first jump made by an 
the local field. A 
Troy station called the incident 
"one of the most unusual bets 



was the Nutmeg Beechcraft, pi- 
loted by Wally Barnes. His pass- 
engers included Record aerial 
photographers Dick Heuer and amateur over 
Phil Collins who recorded the his- 
toric event, and an observer from 
Vassar. 
When 'Voorhis' plane reached a ' ever made" 



Big .Top 



UWF- 



way of conclusion, that it will be 
an enormous mistake if, 
graduating from Williams, Ers- 
kine doesn't become either an 
actor or a newspaper reporter. 



"The Flying Herzogs," namely 

upon Miss Betty Herzog electrofied the 

spectators with her daring high 

trapeze and rope work. 

Other Features 

Others who made scheduled 



Adelphic 



er '49 on the topic, "Resolved 
that the atom bomb be controlled 
by the government." 

Home Debates 

There will be two debates at 
home Saturday. Leonard Gordon 
'50 and Dave Brown '51 will chal- 
lenge Princeton, affirming that 
federal aid be extended to states 
for equalizing education. Edward 
Stack '51 and Larry Lewis '52 will 
support the negative aspect of 
the Communist question against 
Trinity. 

Pour freshmen will attend the 
New England Tournament at 
Dartmouth on April 29-30 to 
contest the statement, "Resolved 
that the United Nations now be 



revised into a Federal World Gov- appearances were Jazzo the Clown 

emment." John Taylor, Laird ^"Bgler Alan Norman, and the 

Barber, David Fischer, and Tom Williamstown High School Band, 

Evans will represent Williams. smartly attired in trim red and 

Harvard and R.P.I. white uniforms. When Hollywood 

"Resolved that a liberal arts ^^^^^ j^^^ j^j^^^ ^g^,jg^ ^_^^^^.^ 
education can better be obtained ,, „ 

at a small college than at a uni- «'«'•« °*her more lucrative offers 

versity" is the topic which Fred awaiting him elsewhere and sud- 

Peyser '50 and Edward Stack '61 denly cancelled his Williamstown 

will discuss with the Harvard engagement, Al Schauffler '49 was 

team at Cambridge on May 9. ,.^„gj ^p^^ to entertain the folks 

At R.P.I, on the same night, , , , 
H. "Pete" Pickard '52 and Baird «"* '^'^ '°'"^°'' ^°"*"- , 
Voorhis '51 will uphold the nega- Unfortunately, Jupiter Pluvius 
tive view of "Resolved that the exerted more Influence over the 
Communist Party be outlawed." midway with the result that Jack- 
Last weekend Arnold Levin '52 (g j^e Wrestling Bear, a mouse 
and George Martin '52 Journeyed , ^ ,.^ ^ ., „ ■ „. ^ 
t„ A~,u» t I. i.1.' circus, and the 'smallest alligator 
to Amherst where they were a- 

warded the decision on the Com- '" '^e world" did not attract as 
munist question. many visitors as were expected. 



and the political action committee 
which is being formed will be 
ready to function by the time 
congressional world government 
resolutions are introduced towards 
the end of this month. In addition 
the chapter is continuing its im- 
portant work in other fields. At 
a meeting Wednesday, retiring 
chairman Dick Goodman spoke to 
the Pittsfield Kiwanis Club on the 
"Case for World Government." 



'Comment' 



McLean, Jr., '51. 

For those who prefer poetry, 
the issue contains pieces by Rus- 
sell Bourne '50, Albert Gucmey 
'52, and Joseph Dewey '51. The 
magazine also will feature the 
artistic work of William Tuttle 
'51 and Donald Rackerby '49. 
Subscriptions for "Comment" are 
being sold in all social units. Ac- 
cording to editorial board mem- 
ber McLean, a favorable response 
to this ^subscription drive among 
students and faculty may mean 
more frequent publication of the 
magazine In the future. 



WE ARI NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS 
FOR THE NEW 



1949 




CONVERTIBLES AND STATION WAGONS 
""' FOR EARLY SPRING DELIVERY. 

HARRY SMITH, Incorporated 

North Adam* 
your FORD and MERCURY dealer 



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New Lamp Shades 

Card Tables $5.95 

Large Gloss Pitchers $ .69 

Heavy Base High Boll Glasses $1.59 a doi. 

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ESTABLISHED 1888 

STUDENT AND HOME FURNITURE 
66 Spring Street Phone 29-R Williamstown, Mast. 



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— Needn't worry Williams undergraduates. Chancer 
are there's room for you at the Williams Club — ot 
speciol rates, too No Curfew 

All this plus fine meals and drinks. Ladies Dining Roon 
and Cocktoir Lounge for dates, theatre ticket service 

"^he Williams Glub 

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Undergraduates are always welcome! 

It'.s Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



introducing- 

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the shirt that knows how to relaxl 

First, it's a regular shirt— as dressy, as collar-right as 
any shirt you ever wore. (Naturaljy — it's a Van Heusen!) 
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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 1949 






In onybody't book, on* of thsm 
ii huitling, atropping Charloi H. 
(Chuck) Percy. Said TIME early 
thl( year: 



Ever since he was an undergraduate 
at the University of Chicago, Charles- 
H. Percy has been a young business- 
man in a hurry. To work his way 
through college (his banlcer father had 
jjone broke in the depression), Chuck 
I'ercy ran a wholesale business supply- 
ing the university's fraternities with 
food, coal, furniture and linen. He also 
held two other jobs, and captained the 
ough, tough water polo team. In the 
summer vacation of 1937 he took a job 
al $12 a week in Chicago's Bell & 
Howell Co. (cameras). For the next 
1 1 K' years he was in & out of Bell & 
Howell, but was seldom out of the 
mind of its president, Joe H. McNabb. 

ll was McNabb who persuaded 
Chuck Percy to work for Bell & Howell 
on weekends and vacations, and gave 
liim a full-time job when he graduated 
(rum Chicago in 11)41. He was put in 
I liarge of a new department to handle 
defense contracts. The contracts rolled 
in so fast that six months later, when 
I'lriy was 21, he was in charge of the 
ii.ijor part of Bell &, Howell's business. 
Just before he joined the Navy as a 
seaman, McNabb made him assistant 
secretary and a company director. 

New Theme. Stationed on the West 
Coast. Percy spent his spare time 
studying West Coast industries and 
the causes of strikes. His reports so 
impressed McNabb that when Chuck 
I'ercy was discharged (as lieutenant), 
he became Bell & Howell's industrial 
relations and personnel director. 




Chuck Percy 

The reports were impressive. 

Percy began to streamline Bell & 
Howell's management. In 18 months, 
he reduced the number of departments 
ironi i8(j to 130, hopes t« bring them 
down eventually to 88. 

New Boss. This week, Percy got (he 
go-ahead to linish the job — and in his 
own way. To succeed McNabb, who 
(lied last week, the directors chose him 
president. At 21), he is boss of a com- 
pany that sold $18 million worth of 
motion-picture cameras and equip- 
nient last \'ear, and earned a net proht 
of some $2,.^oo.ooo. 



m 



'52 Stickmen 
Drop Opener 

Mt.-Hermon Wins, 5-4; 
Chase Scores T'wice 



Di-izzUng rain, a good Mt. Her- 
mon defense, and a lack of control 
over ground balls combined Sat- 
urday to make the opening game 
of the freshman lacrosse team a 
5-4 defeat. 

Prom the outset the referees 
fulfilled their pledge to call fouls 
close, forcing even the veteran 
lacrosse players on the starting 
Purple team to revise the concep- 
tions of the rules. The Inexper- 
ienced players had to learn the 
hard way. Seven penalties were 
called on Williams in the first 
period, two of which resulted in 
an extra-man set-up that hard- 
playing goalie Frank Weeks could 
not stop. With less than two min- 
utes left In the first period, a long 
shot by Nell Chase on an assist 
by Oliver Cobb slid In to make the 
first period score 2-1 for Mt. Her- 
mon. 

Score With Eleven Men 

The first three minutes of the 
second period and a gift from the 
referee accounted for two Her- 
mon goals. After the second of 
these shots had dropped to the 
ground in the cage, it was called 
to the referee's attention that Mt. 
Hermon had scored with eleven 
men Instead of the conventional 
ten. Although a count proved this 
to be true, the goal was still cre- 
dited. 

Pour of Mt. Hermon's five goals 
came with a Purple player in the 
penalty box. Mt. Hermon's last 
score in the third period was soon 
matched with a solo by hard dod- 
ging attack-man Duke Curtis. The 
Freshmen held their opponents 
scoreless in the fourth period 
while Steve Whittier cut from be- 
hind the goal to make the final 
score 5-4. 



Ephmen Lose 
I rack Opener 

? — 

RPI Cops 68-58 Win; 
Half Mile Mark. Set 



RPI's lacrosse minded student 
body might well take a look at the 
track squad which Coach. Henry 
Kimipf has turned out, for his 
future engineers put on a fine 
show In posting a 68-58 win over 
Williams' clndermen last Satur- 
day. 

The harriers from the heights 
of Troy displayed fine overall 
depth and a standout sprinter In 
last year's captain, Johnny Bund- 
schuh. 

Running on an extremely slow 
track due to the steady downpour 
which fell, Bundschuh toured the 
880 yd. stint in the '87 track re- 
cord-breaking time of 1:58.8. Wil- 
liams' Kev Delany, despite only a 
few minutes rest following his 
4:45.5 win in the mile event, pres- 
sed Bundschuh to the tape and 
finished barely two inches behind. 

The RPI ace added further to 
his laurels when he nosed out Eph 
man Bill Barney in the 440 yd e- 
vent. The winning time fwas 50.9 
seconds. 

Bacharach Double Winner 

Sophomore speedster Andy Ba- 
charach labeled himself as a 
promising dashmen by winning 
both the 100 and 220 yard sprints. 
Bacharach's 10.2 seconds in the 
century was good enough to edge 
out both Wachter and Avery of 
RPI, and his 23.2 for the 220 yards 
was slightly better than that of 
teammate Barney, who took sec- 
ond. A third in the 440 gave Bach- 
arach a commendable total of ele- 
ven points for his labors. 
- Pete Maxwell notched a first 
for the Purple in the 220 yd. low 
hurdles when RPI's Bray was dis- 
qualified for sidestepping a hur- 
dle Bray, who finished the low 
See EPHMEN, page 4 



Ditmar Loses 
Five Hitter To 

U. Ot Mass. 



WilKams Home Opener 

Spoiled By 3-1 Loss, 

DeLisser Gets 3 Hits 



Tennismen Rally In Last Match 
To Gain Win Over Army, 5-4 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 



ETHAN ALLEN DAIRY BAR 

Open from 9:30 A.M. till 1 1 :00 P.M. 

FRESH COFFEE 
SANDWICHES FROSTS 



HAMBURGERS 
Our Specialty 

Road to B'town in Williomstown 



A neat five hit pitching perfor- 
mance by George Ditmar went for 
naught on Weston Field last Wed- 
nesday when Bill Anderson, an 
equally talented lefthander, li- 
mited the Ephmen to four hits 
and thus gave the U. of Mass. nine 
a 3-1 win in the Williams home 
opener. Third baseman Stan, De- 
Lisser slapped out three of the 
four Purple hits, one of them 
being a ringing double to center. 

Mass. State scored in the first 
on a two base error, a sacrifice 
and a fly ball and it looked like 
trouble when Anderson struck out 
the side in the lower half of that 
first. Williams cathe back in the 
second, however, when Shay 
Lynch walked and went to third 
on the first of DeLisser's three hits 
Catcher Prltz Zeller then bunted 
down the third base line and 
Lynch scored on the perfectly ex- 
ecuted squeeze. 

A single, a stolen base, a foul fiy 
and another single gave Mass. 
another run and the lead in the 
fourth while singles by Delisser 
and Ditmar were not enough to 
equalize the count in the lower 
half of that inning. Two singles, 
another pilfered base and a fly 
ball added the insurance run in 
the sixth. A phenomenal shoe- 
string catch by Georke Owen pre- 
vented further trouble in the se- 
venth. The last Williams scoring 
opportuntiy cafe in the eighth 
when Owen was hit by a pitch, 
pinch hitter Tom Healy walked 
and both runners advanced on 
Ray Mason's sacrifice. This 
brought DeLisser to the plate and 
after three straight hits he slap- 
See DITMAR, Page 4 



Purple Downs 
Springfield 8-1 

Rain Hinders Lacrosse, 
McWilliams Nets Three 



Robinson-Thurber Duo 

Comes From Behind 

To Assure Victory 



FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

NEW YORK 

Three- Year Doy Course 
Four-Year Evening Course 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Member Assn. of Amer. Law Schools 
Matriculants must be College grad- 
uates and present full tronscript of 
College record. 
CLASSES BEGIN SEPT. 26th, 1949 

For further information address 
Registrar, Fordham University 

School of Low 
302 Broadwoy, New York 1, N. Y. 



by Coke Scofield 

I'he Williams stickmen brought 
home another victory after de- 
feating Springfield College last 
Saturday qn the Indians' East 
Field, 8-1. The game was played in 
a downpour of rain which slowed 
the action and made the ground 
which was completely devoid of 
grass, extremely soft and uneven. 

Gordy McWilliams took scoring 
honors for the contest, with three 
goals and one assist. Ed Maynard 
and Praser Moffat each garnered 
two and Buzz Brumbaugh one for 
the visitors. The Ephmen were 
playing without the services of 
Captain Austy Taliaferro, who 
was sidelined with a head injury 
received in the Union game. 

Maynard opened the Purple 
scoring after eight minutes of the 
first period when he took a pass 
from McWilliams and drove the 
ball home from the crease line. 
Maynard repeated three minutes 
later when he put another shot a- 
way from almost the same spot. 
McWilliams garnered two in the 
second period, one on a nice feed 
from Mitch Fish, to make the in- 
termission score 4-0. 

Rains Came 

Co-Captain Carson of the In- 
dians was the first to dent the 
nets in the second half. Brum- 
baugh followed with Williams on- 
ly goal in the third period. Mof- 
fat notched his two quick goals in 
the opening minutes of the final 
stanza, and McWilliams added the 
gam's last tally. The second half 
was played in steady rain which 
made it difficult to see the ball. 

It was a rough but clean game, 
with the Ephmen being given 
eight penalties and the Maroon 
four. The quality of the Williams 
play was still not up to par. Men 
were very often free on cuts but 
were unable to convert. The stick- 
men will heed more polish In their 
home game against Yale Satur- 
day. 



Taking /advantage of an early 
afternoon downpour which dren- 
ched their clay tennis courts last 
Saturday, Army's netmen lured 
the Purple onto unfamiliar indoor 
courts. However, undaunted by 
the cement surface, low girders, 
and poor lighting. Coach Chaf- 
fee's men rallied brilliantly In 
the clutches and toppled the Ca- 
dets 5-4. 

The Ephmen won the singles 
4-2 to build up a lead which 
quickly melted away when the 
West Po'lnters' first and third 
doubles teams scored crushing 
straight set victories. The num- 
ber two Eph duo of Pete Thurber 
and Stu Robinson dropped their 
first set 7-5, then came to life 
and volleyed expertly as they ran 
off the next two sets 6-1, 6-3 to 
save the day for Williams. 
Thurber Stars 
Thurber was also the Singles 
hero of the day. Down 5-2 in the 
third set, Pete's backhand began 
to click and he passed his oppo- 
nent Truesdale repeatedly as the 
latter attempted to rush the net, 
winning five straight games to 
take the match. Bud Treman, star 
of last year's freshman team who 
has mo*ed up the ladder three 
notches this Spring, scored a de- 
cisive victory in the number five 
spot 6-2, 7-5. 

Charlie Schaaf , still bothered by 
his sore thumb, outlasted Army's 
Maihafer 6-4, 6-8, 6-3. Maihafer 
played an unorthodox game, rush- 
ing in" very close to the net and 
using" a push volley which was 
quite effective due to his quick re- 
flexes. Afraid to lob because of 
the low celling, Schaaf solved this 
problem by taking charge of the 
net himself in the final set. 
Scribner Improved 
Playing the steadiest tennis he 
has displayed so far this Spring, 
Fred Scribner outstroked his op- 
ponent 7-5, 7-5. Stu Robinson was 
overpowered by West Point's ace 
Charlie Oliver 6-1, 6-2, while Disk 
Palmer, as yet unable to regain 
last year's form, also succumbed in 
straight sets. 

Scribner and Bill Rlegel in the 
first doubles pot (the latter a sub- 
stitute for bum-thumb Schaaf) 
managed to win only two games, 
while the^fflmber three pair of 
Palmer an® Treman fared little " 
better. It remained for Robinson 
See TENNISMEN, page 4 



For Rhythm and Romance... 



Successful Business- 
man Charles Percy of 
Bell & Howell reads 
TIME each week — as 
do more than 1,500,000 other U. S. 
college graduates who find in TIME 
the news fhey con'f afford to m/ss. 

To enter your subscription to The 
Weekly Newsmogoxine, see any of 
TilME'S representol-ives ot Willioms 
College - Sorry Benepe, Sigmo Phi, 
or College Book Store 



Take 


Your 


B'town 


Dote To 


The New 


Bowlaway 


Bowling Every Day 

Except Sunday From 

3 PM until Midnite 


Union St. 


Bennington 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Badges Rings Sl.ini 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Stationery ' Progroms 

Club Pins Keys 

M.dals Trophias 

Write or Call 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murroy Ave. Woterford, 'N. Y. 

Telephone Wdterford 644 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 1949 



ACOWlt 



WEDNESDAY 

— Anabella David Niven 

DINNER AT THE RITZ 

FmIhm at 7:00 - 8:50 



THURSDAY 

French Diologue 
Eogliih Titles 

A LOVER'S RETURN 

Feature at 6:50 - 8:50 

FrTdAY - SATURDAY 

LofettQ Young .. Wendell Carey 



THE ACCUSED 

Feature at 6:40 - 8:45 



Tennisinen ■ - • 

and Thurber to pull the meet out 
of the jTlre with fine net play and 
accurately gauged lobs which Just 
missed the low celling. 

Summary 

Ollvffl: (A> beat Robinson (W) 
6-1, 6-2; Scribner (W) beat StlU- 
son (A) 7-6, 7-6; Schaaf (W) beat 
Maihafer (A) 6-4, 6-8, 6-3; Bon- 
durant (A) beat Palmer (W) 6-2, 
8-6; Treman (W) 'beat QlUhan 
-(A) 6-2, 7-6; and Thurber (W) 
beat Truesdale (A) 6-0, 4-6, 7-6. 
OUver-Maihafer (A) beat Scrlb 
ner-Riegel (W) 6-0, 6-2; Robin 
son-Thurber (W) beat Stfllson 
Love (A) 5s7, 6-1, 6-3; and Olll 
han-Bondurant (A) beat Palmer- 
Treman (W) 6-2, 6-3. - ^ 



, .iir-nn 



THEATRE 



NORTH ADAMS 
• NOW - ENDS SAT. • 



^SrAMPSDf/ 
.BlASTim'^ 



i ROBERT MITCHUM 



"■ MRBAMBElSEODESi 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Golfers Lace 
Hofstra, 9-0 

Dick Baxter's Charges 
Open Large Schedule 

Last spring's winning ways were 
resumed by the Williams golfers 
on Saturday as they swamped 
Hofstra College, 9-0 in a steady 
drizzle on the TaCbnic course. 
It was the first start for Coach 
Dick Baxter's team and it was a 
most decisive victory. 

Bucky Marctiese and Captain 
Jerry Cole in the number one and 
two positions respectively, both 
won their Individual matches five 
up and four to play by beating 
Rivers and Chivatti of the Dutch- 
men. Marchese and Cole also won 
-best - ball handUy__by six and flye. 

In the second foursome. Chuck 
White and Dick Heuer had an 
even easier time of it. White over- 
powered CavoU of the visitors by 
eight and seven while Heuer stop- 
ped Silverstone six and five. Best 
ball was won by them seven up 
and five to play. 

Bill Rodle then shot good par 
golf to wallop Miller of Hofstra 
seven and six.- Berry Smith com- 
pleted the route with an eight 
and six defeat of Carberry. The 
last Purple foursome copped best 
ball by an eight and six score too. 



i IIOBEM WESTON w^^j^L'"" 

ADDED FEATURE 

1! 



nfeif-s,*.!]] 



t5jm§'4.Cheg^ 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adami 




Wellesley - • • | 

berlng over 160 voices, will b« 
heard In the first two ohonwea 
from the Moaart "Requiem", and 
a group oi four works by contem- 
porary-American composers. 

This concert will be the seventh 
which the Qlee ,Club has given this 
season, including solo engage- 
ments in BronxvlUe, New York, 
and Bennington; Joint concerts 
with Vassar and Smith';' and two 
radio broadcasts, one over a na- 
tion-wide Mutual hook-up and th© 
other over the New England , Net- 
Work of NBC. The seaijon' will be 
concluded on May li, when th« 
Glee Club has a solo concert In 
Town Hall, New York. 

Tickets for the Wellesley con- 
cert may be obtained from Qlee 
Club members or from Bastlen's 
Jewelry Store. 



Ephmen 



ue 



is smaller than 67, It may fill up 
the vacancies with upperclassmen. 
If the house is larger than 57, but 
has not filled its quota of fourteen 
freshmen, it may do so. | 

The post-season rushing periods 
were shortened from three to two 
weeks, and will begin next year 
on November 28 and May 1, 1960. 
In order to allow houses with large 
Senior classes to pick up some 
men to help in rushing next fall, 
there will be a post-season rush- 
ing period May 2-16. Houses with 
^Kess than 43 freshmen, sopho- 
mores, and juniors now, may take 
in men up to that number. 

John Origgs, chairman of the 
Rushing Committee, said of the 
new quota plan, "The purpose is 
to maintain an 80-20 ratio be- 
tween the fraternities and the 
Club, and therefore to assure suc- 
cessful financial operation of all 
social units." 

Walter Stem, chairman of the 
Entertainment Committee an- 
nounced that there would be a 4 



hurdle race In 36.3 seconds, pro- 
ved a top performer for the eng- 
ineers by oopplng blue ribbons In 
both (he 130 yd high hurdles and 
the broad jump. Ben Read's third 
was WlUiams' only point Inl***^ 
forementioned event, whUs--:Ke and 
Maxwell took second v«r third re- 
spectively In ttt» broad jump. 
Read furthjBF' distinguished him- 
self by il«lng tor first In the high 
juQtp 'with Hench of RPI. The 
'A'lnning height was .B'8". 
Win Shot, Javelin 

Marty Detmer's heave of 44' 
plus far outdistanced RPI'a shot 
put man, John Zebryk of the Ephs 
was third In the event. Tom Ed- 
wards added six points to the pur- 
ple cause with a first In the jave- 
lin and a third In the discus. 

Williams' pole vaulters faulted 
out of the picture at ld'6", giving 
RPI a cle an sweep of the event- 
It took engineer Andrews 10:11.1 
to navigate two miles and thus 
win himself a fhrst. Behind In a 
three-way tie for the place posi- 
tion were Eph workhorses Oeorge 
Hutton, Paul Cook and Harry Ess, 
Hutton, who seems to go for the 
marathon tests, was also an en- 
trant In the mile run and nailed 
down a third for the E^hs. Wil- 
liams' two Smiths Oordy and Fred 
finished third in the 880 and 220 
respectively. 

The thinclads perform on the 
Weston Field oval this afternoon, 
engaging the University of Mas- 
sachusetts at 2 p. m Mass was an 
easy 76-69 victim of the Ephs last 
season. 



a.m. curfew on all houses for Pri 
day and Saturday nights of 
Spring houseparty weekend. The 
Purple Key Constitution was a- 
-dopted, and a student poll on the 



ANSWIRSt I. Philip ^ 

2-|thaii Allen Delry B^K i-Ceimi, 
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evening through the full ' :^jf 
wire AMOeUtcd Preaa service la 

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On Ml* •» 5 f.m. w oU 
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TOM,yOUR REOOIVISM WON'T V 
VARSITY LETTER AS MANASER 
BALL TEAM. THAT MEANS POP 
yOV A /WERE LAONIAPPE IN "" 
CONVERTIBLE FOR YOUR BIRTHDAY 




cutback of the college will be held 
this week. 



Ditmar 



ped a hard grounder at the third 
baseman and a nice throw nipped 
Owen at the plate, killing the 
rally. Ditmar's fine performance 
indicates that he has almost com- 
pletely overcome his injury and 
means thttithe will pitch against 
St. Mike's todaiy. 



PuMM^ PlmfjKi 



1 



Miller, Lamb & Hunter 

Inrorpotaced 

Weber Avenue 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

Telephone 3553 



i.i.i.i.i.i.tti.».i.«^«.<.ci.ttttt^*^»ni»^»ti^i.mf-g 



IVORTHEASTERJV UNIVERSITY 
SCHOOL of LAW 

Admits Men and Women ^ 
Day, Evening and Graduate Programa 
Regl»tration — Sept. 12 to 14, I94n 

Early appUcati<» is necessary 

47 MX. VERNON STREET BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETT' 

TelapkM* KEaaior* •■•>•• 







Use These Words With Toncne in Cheekl 

(Plan ta UM ONE avary waalil) 
lUPHORIC (i>-fo-rlc)-Faallng "In Ida Oraeva". 
FliairuOl (fal£.r1-fvi)-A "Favar Dallavar". 
LACHRYMATORY (laRlri-mC-toTl) - Cup af 

taon, nal diaan, 
lAONIAPn (lan>yap)-A trilling gift. 
NO ClOARim HANOOVIR- Na itala unakad. 

aut tailat na right dry faallng In yaur thraat dua 

ta imalclng. 
raiMOOINITOR (|<!'l^a-s'n-l-lar) - Farabaar; 

riia ''Cha<k4w«li" la yav. 
PROLIOOMINOUS (pra.las.e'm.a.nua) 

— Prafalary. 
PROLIXITY (pra-llk4MI)-Un«A«lndad. 
PUTATIVI (p6-fa4iv)-l(aputMi, rappaiad-ft 

•ai hara. ., 

RKIDIVitM (ra-ald-Uvltm) _ Falling back lata 

bad hablK. 
TONICITY (to-nla-MD-Vlgar, haahk. 



NOeHUUH 

when you smoke 

PHILIP MORRIS 



That', tha ra-«.n ovar 2 IVULUON MQM 
Smokara SWITCHIO to PHILIP MORRISI 



«Mldfi3S£Xi^M«vw^^.< 



^i^£js^Lj:^^^MM^: 




SPALDING 




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IH IMS BEVERLY HtUS TDVRMeV 
WEIHT p|08 QAMGS AND 

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Rawhide reinforcemenia 
•I the (honldera at 
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Racketa keep ilrings 
tlfhtar longer . . , and 
"FIBRE WELDING* 
and "FIBRE SEALING" 
(ire extra atrentih. 



SPALDING 

.••It thei pac* in tporM 




icture Committee Presents 



Charles Abrams^ Authority 
On The Housing Problem 



ijoted Lawyer, Lecturer 
I To Discuss Problems, 
Present His Solutions 



The WUllama Lecture Commit- 
tee will present Charles- Abrams, 

lawyer and lecturer, \yhose skill 
In presenting his first-hand know- 
lodge on the subject of federal 
pnd municipal housing has won 
him popularity with many aud- 
iences. Mr. Abrams will discuss 
jthe housing problem and its so- 
lutions in Jesup Hall on Tuesday, 
,Iay 3, at 8 p.m. 

Speaking at a time when fed- 
eral aid to housing is under fire 
|ln Congress, Mr. Abrams will 
elucidate the topic, "The Hous- 
hng Problem and How To Solve 
lit Withm Our Present Economic 
System." In approaching hous- 
bng problems in general, Mr. Ab- 
Irams expresses the beUef that 
|cach Individual community will 
not get anywhere unless It adopts 
■the philosophy of getting things 
Idone for itself In order to make 
iprogress. 

Lawyer and Author 

Prior to the Interruption of 
■federal and municipal housing 
Iprojects by^World Warn, Mr. Ab- 
Irams was actively engaged In the 
■New York City housing program. 
I He negotiated for the low rent 
housing project In Harlem. Com- 
Iblnlng law with housing, he suc- 
Icessfully defended the constitu- 
Itionality of federal aid to munici- 
Ipal housing projects and drafted 

■ many housmg laws, including the 

■ Emergency Rent Iaw of New 
Vork State. At the present time 
he is lecturing on housing and 
economics at the New York School 
foj Social Research. In the field 
of non-fiction, he is the author of 
The Future of Housing, a detall- 

I ed study of problems in the field. 

On Wednesday afternoon Mr. 

I Abrams Is scheduled to speak to 

the Art 4 class on the problems of 

town planning in relation to the 

present Housing Bill. 



Paraglide Club Lauds 
Dangerous Dan's Feat 

Dangerous DanPugh, Wil- 
liams College foremost para- 
chute-jumper acquired added 
honors and praise for his leap 
of last Sunday when he was 
made a member In good stand- 
ing of the Paraglide Veteran's 
Club of New York State this 
week. 

Daring Dan , a nineteen year 
old non-veteran received a let- 
ter of commendation from 
Louis Montesano, secretary of 
the elite organization, which 
includes one hundred ex-alr- 
bome paratroopers and glider 
men, and was promised that 
his deed would receive due re- 
cognition in the club newspa- 
per and magazine. Montesano, 
founder of the club, also wish- 
ed Pugh the "Very Best of 
Luck" on his next Jump, as yet 
unscheduled. 



Cap And Bells 
Elects Stovall 



Wilder Play To liaise 
Curtain On 'Androcles' 



Adam Stovall 'SO Is the new 
president of Cap and Bells, the 
college dramatic society, and The- 
odore Congdon '50, the new treas- 
urer as a result of elections held 
last week, retiring president Peter 
Candler '49 announced. 

As a result of the favorable re- 
ception to his "Happy Journey" 
a few years ago, the organization 
has decided to give Thorton Wild- 
er's "Long Christmas Dinner" as 
a curtain raiser to the forth 
coming production of George 
Bernard Shaw's "Androcles and 
the Lion", Candler also announc 
ed. 
John Lassel '50, William Spencer 

See CAP & BELLS, Page 3 



Chamber Of Commerce Holds 
'Faith In North Adams Week' 



by Dave Ruder 

Cry "flick Squad", and you will probably find yourself on the 
road to North Adams, preparing to enjoy a movie at one of the 
town's three theatres. 

Whatever North Adams connotes to the Williams undergraduate 

— a place In which to see a movle,^ — — 

or perhaps just an industrial I cemed. The leaders of the drive 
town — Its inhabitants regard | ask mainly for tacreased com- 
thelr community very highly, i munlty consclesneSs in an ef- 



They have just completed a 
'Faith m North Adams Week", 
aimed at reorganizing and ex- 
panding the Berkshire city. The 
drive is asking the townspeople 
lo take stock of themselves emd 
And a new faith in their sur- 
roundings. 

The Chamber of Commerce, the 
leaders of the drive, trace the 
main reason for the loss of faith 
to layoffs and unemployment In 
North Adams. "Our prime con- 
cern," they say, "is to put people 
back to work." 

' $15,000 Budget 

The Chamber wants to bring 
new Industries Into the town to 
use the Idle capacity and build 
new; plants. In line with Ihls de- 
sire a movement has begun to 
obtain a $16,000 budget, of which 
the Chamber proposes to spend 
$8,800 in the drive to bring more 
Industries to North Adams, with 
1300 to be given "for civic Im- 
provement," a singular amount 
"for promotional work and pub- 
licity", and the balance for costs 
to the administration. The chanc- 
es of securing the $1S,000 in full 
seemed "dim" on Monday, April 
3S, as far as Chamber leaders and 
ofBciala of the North Adams 
Boosters' association were con- 



fort to keep North Adams on a 
par with other New England 
towns. 

Although a goodly number of 
the town's 23,000 inhabitants 
still feel the pinch of dis-toflatlon, 
employment in the community is 
on the up-grade, according to 
the NACC. 

A variety of Industries have 
made their homes in North Adams 
since it was founded in 1772. The 
"Ephiam Williams Mills", found- 
ed by Williams' benefactor, were 
among the first to be started. 
Since then, cotton goods, woolen, 
fabric, shoe, glove, brush, and o- 
ther tadustrles have located In 
the town. 
- Tunnel —'■••- 

Besides being the site of three 
motion picture houses and the 
start of the Mohawk Trail, North 
Adams has a few other distinc- 
tive features. The renowned Bos- 
ton and Mam Hoosac Tunnel, one 
of the longest in the world was 
built at the Insistence of towns, 
people in 187S, at a cost of (20 
mlllloii and 195 lives to build. 

The modem age came to North 

Adams at an early date. In 1806, 

"the main street was cleared of 

the unsightly stumps, excepting 

See FAFTH, Page 6 



Lecture Lauds 
MacArthur's 
Japan Regime 

McLaren Points Out 
Purposes, Problems, 
Duties Of Occupation 



The duties,' purposes, and pro- 
blems of the MacArthur regime 
in Japan were the subjects of a 
lecture by Dr. Walter McLaren, 
Professor Emeritus of Economics 
at Williams durmg a meeting of 
the International Relations Club 
Tuesday evening In Grlflln Hall. 

The possibilities cf future Jap- 
anese imperialism was the first 
point of attack of the American 
occupational forces. MacArthui- 
saw to it that the Japanese were 
stripped of their • war-making 
powers and made sure that anti- 
war provisions were included in 
the new Japanese constitution. 

Economic Recovery 

The occupation forces have 
worked to bring the country to 
economic normalcy. It has been 
estimated that this recovery has 
been 40J- completed. If the nor- 
mal productive capacity of Japan 
can be restored, and If the coun- 
try can be made self-sufficient, 
Japan's imperialistic desires will 
disappear, McLaren claimed. 

The MacArthur regime Is mata- 
ly attempting to turn Japan tato 
a democracy. Since the United 
States holds the key positions in 
the command of the occupational 
government, the Japanese brand 
of democracy looks amazingly 
Uke the American. Some of the 
problems encountered by the oc- 
cupation forces have probably 
been the result of a«too rapid at- 
tempt, stated McLaren. Trade 
unions sprung up throughout the 
country almost immediately, and 
because of a war-caused infla- 
tion, prolonged wage strikes be- 
came wide-spread. 

When effective controls can be 
developed to allow these organi- 
zations to function without ty- 
ing up the industries they have 
acected, Japanese economic pro- 
gress under the occupation can 
be speeded up greatly, McLaren 
emphasized. 

MacArthur has wanted to leave 
Japan for some time now, putting 
control in the hands of the 
Japanese government under UN 
supervision. The US government, 
despite the huge costs of occupa- 
tion, would like to see MacArthur 
remain where he is. MacArthur in 
Japan is an asset to us in case 
of war in or from the Par East. 



MacVane Talk 
Praises Radio, 
Journalism 



Describes Piofessions 

As ^Most Fascinating'; 

Cites Opportunities 



Speaking on radio broadcasting 
and Journalism, John MacVane 
'33, claimed they are the "most 
fasctaatlng and Interesting pro- 
fessions to the world." Mr. Mac- 
Vane, who spoke to some 25 stu- 
dents in the Sigma Phi house 
Monday evening, has been a re- 
porter and foreign correspondent, 
and Is now a radio news broad- 
caster with NBC. 

Although fortunes are rare in 
journalism and, likewise, are few 
in radio. In spite of people like 
Bob Hope, you do meet the most 
interesting people In the world. 
You get to know the figures who 
are making history and have the 
satisfying feeling of knowing what 
is going on In the world. 

Plenty Of Opportunities 

But he advised not to "go into 
radio or newspaper work unless 
you are convinced it is the only 
thing you want to do. It is no 
place to mark time while making 
up your mind" For those with 
interest and ideas, however, there 
are still plenty of opportunities. 

"If you are interested in human 
beings as human beings and in 
the world around you, it you are 
interested in why things happen. 
Journalism or radio Is your field," 
but don't try to start right out in 
the big time. At least a year's 
experience on a non-metropolitan 
paper or station is almost essen- 
'Ual. 

Small Town Experience 

Small town experience gives a 
much broadej background of the 
whole Held, for the large c(»i!ani- 
zatlons are mainly filled with 
specialists who do only one Job. It 
may mean that you have to cover 
such things as the Women's Club 
Flower Show, but it's the only 
way to learn the basic funda- 
mentals of the trade. "You're no 
good to a paper your first year 
anyway, and it is only out of the 
goodness of their hearts that they 
employ you. It's Just that they can 
make you work hard, for little 
pay on all the scrimy Jobs." 

Mr. MacVane said the only dif- 
ference between reporting for a 
radio and a paper is that for the 
former you need a good pair of 
tonsils in addition to writing abil- 
ity. "However, I don't know any 
prominent commentator today 
who wasn't first a newspaper re- 
porter." 



WMS's Future Endangered 
By Possibility Of FCC Rule 
Against Commercial Stations 



Wellesley Sends 83 
For Concert Tonight 

Singmg its seventh concert 
of the current season, and its 
only one in Williamstown, the 
Williams Glee Club welcomt^ 
eighty-three girls from Well- 
esley for a Joint concert to- 
night in Chapin Hall at 8:15. 

A choral fantasy of Williams 
songs entitled "WlUiamsiana" 
and written by Professor Ro- 
bert Barrow, and an arrange- 
ment of a Sondheim piece, 
"When I See Yoy" will be fea- 
tured on the program which 
will also include selections ran- 
ging from the sixteenth cen- 
tury to the present day. 

Unreserved seats at $1 of re- 
served seats at $1.50 may be 
bought at the door tonight. 



Station Airs 
UWF Drama 



Baseball Game, Variety 
Quiz Show Next Week 



Among the highlights of this 
week's broadcasts over WMS wfil 
be four skits setting forth the 
work of the United World Feder- 
alists. They will be aired Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs- 
day nights at 9:15. 

On Thursday night at ten, the 
Vemey Variety Quiz Show will 
offer prizes, to anyone, called at 
random about the campus, who 
can correctly identify a song play- 
ed on the broadcast. 

The station's regular Saturday 
afternoon feature, "Open House 
at the Inn", with the Purple 
Benights Quartet, will be heard 
at 5:30. This afternoon's baseball 
game with St. Michael's also will 
be broadcast by WMS at 2:55 and 
relayed through station WMNB in 
North Adams, 



Graef, Alberti 
Top Speakers 

Twelve Vie For Honors 
In Oratorical Contest 



Twelve students competed in 
the Ellzur Smith Contest in im- 
promptu speaking Tuesday night 
at Griffin Hall as Edgar Graef, 
Jr., '49 and Charles Alberti, Jr. 
'60 won first and second prizes 
respectively. For their efforts they 
received cash awards of $35 and 
$15. All contestants were allowed 
three minutes to prepare a two- 
three minute talk on selected 
topics. 

Speaking on Max Lerhef 
quotation that "A liberal is a 
man tvho wants bread and free- 
dom," Oraef pointed out the par- 
adox in the situation whereby 
many freedom-loving Americans 
also realize the need for certain 
necessities and therefore surren- 
der part of their freedom to se- 
cure these necessities. Alberti in 
his talk discussed the role of dis- 
placed persona In the history of 
the Tlhlted States; stressing the 
Idea that we are essentially a na- 
tion -of displaced persons. 



Chapel Group 
Re- Organized 

Wineman Heads Twelve 
Man Advisory Itoard 



At the recommendation of the 
Gargoyle Society, twelve under- 
graduates, chairmaned by Henry 
Wineman '50, were appointed to 
positions on the Chapel Commit- 
tee by the College Chaplain, A. 
Grant Noble. 

The need for such an organiza- 
tion, which has not been in oper- 
ation since 1947, was recognized 
this year in the appearance of 
undergraduates at chapel services 
acting in an ungentlemanly man- 
ner. Gargoyle president Edwin 
Maynard stated. It was empha- 
sized that the committee is not a 
police force nor will it enforce a 
set of rules other than those com- 
monly used in conducting oneself 
at any religious service. 

Three members will be at each 
See CHAPEL, PAGE 6 



Submit Brief For FCC 
Consideration In Fight 
To Continue Operation 



There may be no "Voice of Wil- 
liams College" at this time next 
year. This blow to the dialers on 
the Williams campus comes as 
the result of Federal Communica- 
tions Commission rules applicable 
to college radio stations such as 
WMS which are now in the pro- 
cess of being revised by the FCC. 

In the past campus radio has 
not had to operate under FCC 
regiulation, but for some time 
there has been a definite need to 
bring it under such control. The 
new rules which the FCC is pro- 
posing are for the most part of a 
technical nature and could easi- 
ly be met by WMS, said station 
president Frederick Peyser '50. 
Outlook Grim 

However, the FCC has tadicated 
that it will look to the Intercolleg- 
iate Broadcasting System to re- 
present the views of campus ra- 
dio as a whole. WMS, is not a 
member of this organization. IBS 
takes the position that regulation 
is needed and that all college 
radio should go on a non-profit, 
non-commercial basis. WMS will 
be in a bad position if such a 
measure is enacted into an FCC 
ruling. 

According to Peyser, Williams 
College is not In a position to sub- 
sidize WMS to any extent what- 
soever. The effect of an FCC 
non-commercial rule on WMS 
would simply mean that the 
campus station would be forced 
to close up shop. According to a 
recent student opinion poll con- 
ducted by the station, he said, 
there are a tew individuals who 
think this would be a pretty good 
idea anyway. Also according to 
that poll, however, the majority 
of the student body listeners are 
anxious to see the station con- 
tinue as a successful campus acti- 
vity. 

Organize Campaign 
See WMS'S, Page 6 



Tradition Of Mother^ s Day 
Approaches Forty-Third Year 

by Dick Duflleld 

On the second Sunday in May, Mother's Day will be observed 
throughout this country and the world in simple home gatherings 
and large public celebrations. Today the spirit of Mother's Day 
pervades every comer of society, even into Sing Sing prison whose 
hard-bitten inmates sent some 600 greeting cards to their mothers 
in 1947. 

Miss Mary Towles Sasseen, a . 

red-haired school teacher of Hen- 
derson, Kentucky, held the first 
Mother's Day celebration in the 
Henderson school house in May 
1887. Her idea never got very far, 
and it is doubtful if Anna Jarvis, 
the real founder of Mother's Day, 
had even heard of It when she 
conceived her own plans in 1906. 
President Wilson 
The year before, her mother 
Mrs. Anna Reeves Jarvis had died 
in Philadelphia, leaving a mod- 
erate fortune to Anna, then an 
attractive woman in her middle 
forties, and it occurred to Anna 
that it would be nice to have a few 
friends with her on the anniver- 
sary to share remmiscenc^s. On 
the second anniversary of her 
deftth, a church service in mem- commercialization of her holiday 
ofy of Mrs. Jarvis was held in thesfimd became more and more con- 
vinced that the day was her pro- 
perty. Incorporating herself as 
the Mother's Day International 
Association, she registered her 
trademark: "Second Sunday In 
May. Mother's Day. Anna Jarvis, 
Pounder." 

As she grew older, she grew 
more embittered. In 1932 the 
sponsors of a big Mother's Day 
celebration In New York were 
forced to call the whole thing off 
when she threatened suit. Iiegal 
See TRADITION, page 2 



Simple Tenet 

Before long, the Idea had spread 
to 43 nations and Miss Jarvis was 
corresponding with people from 
every walk of life — kings, club- 
women, presidents, editors, and 
statesmen. Her idea always re- 
mained simple: 

"Live this day your best day." 

She received so many answers 
to her letters that she was forced 
to buy the house next door to 
store them in. In the parlor there 
was always the big urn filled with 
palms from her mother's funeral, 
and in front of her portrait a bowl 
of china roses. 

Old and Embittered 

Gradually she became embitter- 
ed at what she considered the 



Andrews Methodist Church of 
Grafton, W. Va., where she had 
taught Sunday school for twenty 
years. 

Spurred on by Miss Jarvis' pen 
and ink crusade, the Mother's 
Day movement began to. sweep 
across the nation in 1908. It re- 
ceived official recognition In 1914, 
when President Wilson signed a 
congressional resolution setting 
aside the second Sunday in May 
lis Mother's Day and authorizing 
the Federal display of the flag. 




:.^i/Y']'-V-- 



THE WILLIAAAS RECORD SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1949 



f tre Milliipl B^fxrj^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, ot the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Soturdoy during the college yeor. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, WiHiomstown, Telephone 72 



Editor 
Managing Editors 

981-M or 331 . News Editor 

Sports Editors 
Senior Associate 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 

Norman S. Wood '50 

Phihp S. Collins '50 (Phone 

Lansing G. Scofleld '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

Williom R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson, 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E, Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hastings, 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W 
Widing. 

Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

John S.-Prescott, Jr. '50 
Edward L. Stockhouse '50 
Horry Frozier, III '51 
Douglas D, Garfield '50 
Edward C. Stebbins '51 
W. Robert Mill '51 




Business Monoger 

Advertising Manager 
Ass't Advertising Manager 
Circulation Manager 

Treasurer 



Business Staff: 1950- B, Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Ganyord, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moil, H, Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



Volume LXIII 



APRIL 30, 1949 



Number 13 



Glee Club 



Tonight will see the Glee Club in their first and only home per- 
formance this year, but, if the college attitude rings true to former 
years, more students will hit the flicks than pass through the Grecian 
portals of Chapin Hall. This is a sad state for Williams culture to be 
in — it seems to be pretty low-brow through and through — but 
it is a attitude which is widespread on the campus. Strangely enough 
it plagues most seriously those organizations which are doing the 
best job. (Only 231 students attended the two-night stand of the 
recent Cap and Bells production of "All the King's Men", even though 
it cost only 5c more than the local flicks.) 

Some of the upper-middle brows have kicked about not being 
able to hear our own Glee Club more often, but the fact of the mat- 
ter Is, that it just doesn't pay either financially or educationally to 
sing in Williamstown. The small student audiences hardly pay the 
costs, which run close to $500 for a joint concert like tonight's. 

Out-of-town performances, on the contrary, usually All the 
concert halls as well as the bank book. They permit the 60-man Club 
to carry the high cost of such enterprises as the Town Hall per- 
formance in New York, May 12, and the 5-city Midwestern tour 
that is being considered for next year. 

Our Glee Club is one ot the best in the country, and, for that 
reason together with its capable business management, is one of the 
few that ..can draw large enough audiences to operate completely 
Independent of outside help. Most other Glee Clubs have either large 
sinking funds, like Harvard, or a few large angels, like Yale. 

That is, it can draw large audiences everywhere except in Wil- 
liamstown, where it must count on Williams students for support. It 
is a sad situation when students repudiate their own talent, and 
especially so when that talent is among the best. 



BLOOD QUOTA TOPPED The quota of 100 pints of blood set for 
Tuesday's Williamstown visit of the bloodmoblle went over the top 
by 18 pints, one more than the 117 donated last year. Over three 
fourths of the donors were College students. Thirty who showed up 
without appointments made up for the. rejections and cancellations 
which had threatened the drive. 

TOUJOURS YALIES . . . 52.4 per cent of the girls at Vassar apd Smith 
would rather go to the New Haven Derby Day than anywhere on the 
weekend of May 6, according to a recent poll conducted by the "Yale 
Daily News" 30.9 per cent of the troops, who are "writhing In 
anguish and anticipation," voted for second-place Princeton. Dart- 
mouth was a poor third with 9.8 per cent. "The only intelligent com- 
petitor, continued the "Yalie Dalle". "Is Williams which, acknowledg- 
ing the superior forces ranged against them, withdrew from the field 
and changed their housepartles." 

TOUGH COURSE ... Edward Messner, Harvard '49, a mathematics 
major, was lounging in the University's Memorial Hall one after- 
noon when he noticed that an hour examination was being admin- 
istered. He spotted a friend, sat down next to him, and asked, "What's 
the name of this course?" 

"Social Relations 114," replied his friend, and buttressed with 
this fact, Messner proceeded to write a C-plus paper. He had been 
to none of the lectures and had done none of the reading in the 
course. He scored 9 points out of 20 on the first part, 4 on the 
second, and 18 on the third, on which the teacher commented, "To 
my mind, excellent!! If you had dealt with another point or two 
you would have hit the jackpot." The question dealt with two book 
reviews neither of which Messner had ever read. He chose the one 
entitled "The American People" because "Its title gave me some clue 
to what the book is about." 

MUSCLE MEN.., Thirty-three contestants have signed up for the 
Apollo Contest to be sponsored by Cornell's Octagon Club on May 
13. A cup, a pair of white bucks, and a case of champagne, will be 
awarded to the most beautiful body. 

ON THE OTHER HAND. . Alpha Phi Omega at Boston University 
is holding an Ugly Man Contest to determine the ugliest ape on 
campus. Proceeds bring a worthy European boy scout to this country 
for a college education. 

PEDAL PUSHERS. . .The WOC could profitably look into what seems 
to be the latest trend in collegiate sports events; namely bicycle 
racing. The Harvard Outers recently ran oft their annual Harvard- 
to'-Wellesley marathon, in which 30 contestants competed for first 
prize of a Schwinn bicycle and the Wellesley girls with lemonade 
who were waiting on the other end. And on April 30. sixty members 
of the Cornell Hotel Administration school will race from Syracuse 
back home. A spin over the Wllllamslown-Bennington road would 
give some of the local speed merchants a chance to Impress their 
friends without creasing fenders. 

NOW TRICYCLES. ..Union College has passed up a challenge from 
RPI to send their student leader against the latter's newly elected 
student marshall in a joust following a parade and celebration. Tri- 
cycles were to be used as horses, and long poles tipped with boxing 
gloves as spears. 

MONKEY BUSINESS, . , Don't pnic if you see a strange face looking 
in your window one night soon. Chances are it belongs to a rhesus 
monkey, left over from the Rotary Club circus. John Perry was so 
Impressed by the animal that he prevailed on his father to buy it. 
The monk escaped during its first feeding and is still on the loose. 



Letters To The Editor 



To the Editor of the Williams Record: 

A few pertinent points in regard to Mr. Taylor's late lament of 
the 27th. 

First, there could have been no more imaginative experimenta- 
tion exercised in the production of "All the King's Men" than there 
was. To put the AMT "Heirarchy" in a position where they do not 
find it necessary to mortgage their souls to set a show would be a 
much more apropos suggestion. The AMT pays its own way, what- 
ever road it takes, and at $.60 a head the road is awfully well- 
constructed. 

Secondly, what does the time necessary to change sets have to do 
with the quality of acting? And if it does damage the actor's sub- 
jective approach to wait thirty seconds for the set to be struck 
and re-set. what would Mr. Taylor like the stage crew to do about 
it? There are many ways to set a show... the AMT has used them 
all. We apoloRlze in that we could find no four-armed students for 
the crew. 

Thirdly, so Stack and Gushee contribute performances that are 
"penetrating and mature " or "bone-chilling". So what? Those of 
us who spend many free hours in the theatre sometimes take the 
trouble to learn why these adjectives apply. Does the reviewer 
know what makes for a "mature" performance? Perhaps he does 
but I've never heard him say so. So Mason and Levitt "were less 
outstanding because they failed to convince one that they knew 
precisely what they were talking about." But does our favorite re- 
viewer know why they failed to convince (if they did.) Perhaps if 
they were told why this time, they might convince the next time. 
Of course, the reviewer would be put to a lot of bother trying to learn 
something about the art he is criticizing, so maybe the adjectives 
are better! 

Fourthly. If Cathy Munger failed, In Mr. Taylor's eyes, to make 
anything credible, it was purely because Mrs. Munger likes to say 
her lines as they were written for her. The reviewer must remember 
that, the "Sadie" in the novel he is reading in English 90-95 Is a 
much more predominate character than the "Sadie" from the play 
he was reviewing. Let's keep them clearly separated in our minds, eh? 

Fifthly, what does Howard Ersklne's future have to do with the 
production of "All the King's Men"? (Just curious. . . ) 

And sixthly, speaking for "the one small midget", John Lasell, 
El Grlflenberg, Ted Josselyn, and myself, I suggest that the next 
time Mr. Taylor takes his "reviewer's " pen in hand, he first plan to 
have been backstage at the AMT for a few hours. We'd be very 
happy to show him what is going on. Truth Is really much stranger 
than Action! 
April 27, 1949 Yours for Intelligent reviews, 

Martin p. Luthy, Jr. '51 



Hitting The Flicks 



Tradition 



troubles found her, and her mon- 
ey dwindled away. 

Wh?n she finally went to a 
hospital, her affairs were In such 
a muddle th^t she was really a 



pauper. Old and blind, and too 
feeble to feel bitterness, she be- 
came reconciled In 1944. As her 
physician expressed It, "happy 
most of the time In knowing that 
Mother's Day Is firmly enough 
established to go on without her 
prodding." 



•""u^i*" 



UNDERGRADUATES APPRECIATE 

THE GENERALLY LOWER PRICES IN 

BROOKS BROTHERS' SIXTH FLOOR SHOP 

College men aie iimiiny; Brooks Brothers' most 
enthusiastic fans. .They're especially partial to 
Diir Sixtli Floor Shop, which ^ives them typi- 
c.il Brooks Brothers' quality at generally lower 
prices. \V^■ have wide selections assembled there 
. . . all retifctiiig the Quality and Good Taste for 
which Brooks Brothers are famous. 

■■TABLItNID !•>• 




U6 M.ADISON AVKNL'K, COR. 44TII S'l'., NKW YORK I7,'*r,- V 

46 NKWBL'R'y, COR, RKRKKI.KV S IRKK T, llOS'l ON 16, M,\SS 

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Pen and Pencil Sett 

Jewelry 

Fine Wotchet 

Silverware 



NORTH ADAMS 



THE ACCUSED (Tonight)This picture is the epitome of the psycho- 
logical mystery thriller. Loretta Young gives a great performance 
as a teacher who is more or less forced to kill one of her pupils when 
he gets amorous to the point of force. Wendell Corey plays the detec- 
tive and shares with Robert Cummlngs the distinction of falling in 
love with Loretta, Cummlngs too is out to. catch up with the boy's 
murderer, and this triangle provides some very taut emotional scenes, 
which fortunately are kept pretty well in hand. What it all adds up 
to is superior entertainment, if you like your pictures with a gasp 
and a sigh. 

THE SNAKE PIT iSun-Mon> If there is anyone around who hasn't 
heard about this picture, then this is no place to recommend it. This 
is the one which made Olivia DeHaviland an Academy Award con- 
tender, to be beaten only by Jane Wyman's wonderful performance^-l 
in Johnny Belinda. It is the story of a sensitive woman on the brink 
of utter insanity, and how she is treated in a "typical" Insane hos- 
pital. This of course makes the picture not only a dramatic triumph, 
but provides some startling commentary on modern, civilized methods 
of treating tho.se unfortunates. The picture is done with a great deal 
of intelligence and what could easily have turned into a lot of sense- 
less histrionics becomes moving and poignant. 

THE OLYMPIC GAMES OF 1948 (Tuesi Undoubtedly the finest full- 
length coverage of a .sports event ever made, this technicolored gem 
will be something you will not easily forget. It is the official docu- 
mentary of the Games of last summer, complete with all the color- 
ful pageantry, plus a subtle commentary on international relations, 
and is narrated by Bill Stei-n and Ted Huslng, both of whom ought 
to be familiar to sports fans. The photography Is beautiful, and the 
whole thing is very tastefully handled. With a superb cast of Ameri- 
can atheletes. 

THAT HAMILTON WOMAN i Weds I A revival of this Alexander 
Korda classic ought to be welcomed by almost everybody. Vivian 
Leigh and Lawrence Olivier share the honors, she as the notorious 
Emma Hamilton, and he as Horatio Nelson, the hero of English sea 
tradition. The picture tells of their touching romance, and while !t 
is well done, a little more stlcking-to-fact would not have harmed It. 
Vivian is naturally the darling of the film, and any qualities Kmma 
Hamilton might have had which would have made her fate deserved 
are carefully glossed over. There Isn't much you can say about 
Olivier's performance that hasn't been covered a dozen times, but 
his work in this picture quite lives up to the masterpieces he has 
been turning out of late. 

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (Thurs-Frl) Jean Coeteau's latest Is an 
adaption of the fable of the same name. However, this Is no Kiddies 
Delight, but a serious attempt to produce an unusual and charming 
eflect, and. as such. It succeeds. The Interpretation Is Imaginative 
to a high degree, but there Is enough realistic emotion lying around 
to ke^ you interested In what is going on. The total effect Is very 
much like that of a daydream, or a nightmare, but despite all the 
good stuff in It, It Is still an arty picture, calculated to please tl^e 
aesthete. 

A NIGHT AT THE OPERA (Sat) Probably the funniest of the Marx 
brothers series. Its scene Is laid, of all places. In an opera house. This 
In no way hinders the antics though, and while the singing occasion- 
ally gets In the way, the three boys manage to keep things moving 
through most If it. For the appreclator of pure slapstick, it Is another 
field-day, and the situation comedy Is good enough to keep the more ' 
sophisticated happy. Qroucho is the manager of an opera singer, and 
by the time he gets through meddling with the Met, a happy ending 
U AHured. 



PERSONALIZED GIFTS FOR 
MOTHER'S DAY 



Suggested are 

♦ STATIONERY 

♦ NAPKINS 

♦ PLAYING CARDS 

♦ PENCILS 

♦ FOUNTAIN PENS 

♦ MATCHES 




£am^'l SiaiUmefuf Sto^ 



TIME FOR WHITE BUCKS 




Genuine China Buck 

Full Leather Lined 

HEAVY RED 

RUBBER SOLES 



Sizei 6 to 13 

This tome shoe also 
in Brown Coif. 



FRANK 



S A L V Y ' S 



AL 



Estoblishod 1901 



\ 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1949 



IF YOU ARE IN DOUBT OVER WHAT TO GET 
MOTHER, STOP IN AND GET OUR ADVICE 

WE HAVE THE LATEST IN SPRING 
GLOVES. SCARFS, UMBRELLAS, AND HAND BAGS. 

CI $|C'* TCWN SHC^ 

WILLIAMSTOWN 



MAYS 

is Mother's Day 




don't forget her. she will appreciate one 
Of the many fine gifts we have to offer - - 

• hand painted luncheon trays 

• Cyma bureau clocks 

• demitatse cups 

• glassware 

• jewelry 



Bastien^s 



■ • STEAK - 

DINNERS 



• SEA 

FOOD 

• COCKTAILS 



I 



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THE 

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for the best in 

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the center of Williomstown 

on Route 7 



PHONE 267 



! 



Open til 1 



Football Man4tgership To 
Be Split Into Two Positions; 
Fitch, Gibson Share Duties 



Beginning next fall the varsity football managerlalshlp will be 
expanded Into two separate divisions, of a business manager and a 
field manager, under a new plan announced by Director of Athletics 
John C. Jay this week. 

Several additions to the duties of the job, Including an increased 
publicity campaign to boost attendance at home games, the manage- 
ment of the football program, andj, 

the responsibility of spring foot- 
ball practice, have necessitated 



having two managers of equal 
rank operating In seperate lelds. 
After next fall each manager will 
have two assistant managers 
working under him, making a 
total of six men In the system. 

Under the new set-up, the bus- 
iness manager will handle all fi- 
nancial arrangements, including 
tlckets,the training table, and hir- 
ed personnel. He will plan the 
trips, supervise publication of tha 
program, handle the publicity in 
cooperation with the News Bureau 
and be in charge of the press-box 
arrangements. 

The field manager will work 



and the loser dropping out, A fifth 
Junior will get the post of fresh- 
man football manager. 

In the past there has been only 
a senior football manager and an 
assistant manager, in addition to 
the manager of freshman football. 
It is hoped that better results 
will be obtained by extending the 
competition over a two-year per- 
iod, and four positions as assis- 
tant manager now are open to 
sophomores, whereas there was 
only one before. 

New Opportunities 

The Increasing Importance of 
the football managerlalshlp means 
that both of the new top positions 
will be on an equal level, and 



Saints Beat Out AD's, D Phi's 
In Inter-Fraternity Sing 



No Bookstore Refunds 
Until Bills Are Paid 

Until students owing money 
to the defunct Student Bookl- 
store pay their bills, the SAC 
will be imable to reimburse the 
members of their $2. 

In re-emphasizlng this fact, 
SAC President Schuyler Brooks 
'50, declared that, as yet, no 
student bills have been paid. 
He refuted the argument that, 
since the Student Bookstore 
has folded, bills due are can- 
celled. Bills outstanding should 
be paid to the Undergraduate 
Council, c/p Mr. Albert Oster- 
haut at the Old Faculty House. 



with the squad and coaches and ^^^^ sophomore compet is given a 



will be responsible for the handl- 
ing and care of all equipment, 
the scoreboard, seating arrange- 



better chance of rising to the top 
in one of the two divisions- 

By separating the duties that 



ments for home games, and all , f^^^^jy ^g,.g handled by sev- 



actlvlty on Cole and Weston Fields 
Fitch, Gibson Managers 



eral men working together, the 
organizational set-up has been 



Next fall John Gibson '50 and streamlined for better efficiency 
Lawrence Fitch, Jr. '50 will fill the ^^^ ^^^ of business manager will 
posts of field manager and busi- j ^^^^ excellent opportunities for 
ness manager respectively. | ^j^gse men interested in the inan- 

A compfet will work in either of ' cial and executive sides of the 
the two divisions as a sophomore • game, who wish to obtain practi- 
and if successful will become one cal experience in business oper- 
of the four assistant managers | ations. while the field manager 
as a junior. The two assistant ma- will be able to work directly with 
nagers in each division also will the coaches and the players on 
compete, with the winner moving the field at all times and will ob- 
into the position of field manager tain valuable experience in future 
or business manager as a senior personnel work. 



Life Insurance 
Topic Of Talk 

Guidance Series Covers 
Sales, Home Office 




When the next in the series of 
Vocational Guidance begins, 
George Shoemaker '28 will speak 
on "Selling Life Insurance as a 
Career," Monday evening. May 2, 
at 7:30 in the Phi Delta Theta 
House. A successful General A- 
gent of the Provident Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of Phil- 
adelphia, Mr. Shoemaker is to be 
accompanied by Ladd Plumley '25, 
Vice President of the State Mu- 
tual Life Assurance Company Of 
Worcester, who is prepared to co- 
ver non-sales positions In the 
"Life Insurance Home Office." 
Seven Other Interviewers 

Seven representatives of the 
life insurance, banking, and in- 
dustrial merchandising fields have 
been secured by the Placement 
Bureau to interview seniors dur- 
ing the coming week for positions 
with their respective organiza- 
tions. 

Tuesday, May 3: Both Mr. Shoe- 
makL-r and Mi-. Plumley will be 
interviewing Interested seniors. 
Wednesday, May 4; From the 
Travelers Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Assistant Secretary R. 
M. Dunne is looking tor single 
men to train six months in the 
Home Office for Group Field Re- 
presentatives, followed by an as- 
signment to a Branch Ofiice. A 
See LIFE, Page 6 



Phi Gams, Zetes, Phi 
Delta Sing Monday 



The Saint Anthony Octet gain- 
ed a unanimous decision last 
Monday night to win the third 
round of the Interfraternlty Sing 
over Delta Phi and Alpha Delta 
Phi. Their victory means that 
they will meet the KA's and Slg 
Phis In the Irst semi-final round 
on May 16. 

With Fred PeiTy '49. and John 
Malcom, '52 singing first tenor, 
Pete Leake, '50 and Nick Dan- 
forth, '51, second tenor, Pete Cor- 
nell, '52 and Charles Turpln, '49, 
baritone, and Ben Read, '49 and 
Brett Boocock, '52, second bass, 
the Saints sang ,^'Are You From 
Dixie," "Carolina," "Coney Is- 
land Baby," and a medley of "My 
Evaline," "I Care Not." and "In 
The Good Old Summer Time." 
AD'S Sing Best Song 

Although the judges felt that 
the Saints did the best all around 
job, they voted the Dartmouth 
"Winter Song", sung by the AD's, 
as the best song of the evening. 

Last year the Saints reached 
the final round of the Interfra- 
ternlty Sing, only to lose to the 
Dekes. The Dekes were elimin- 
ated last week as contenders for 
this year's crown by the Sigs. 

Next week's round, to be held as 
usual at 10 p.m. Monday evening 
in the Studio Theatre of the AMT, 
will feature the octets from the 
Phi Gams, Zeta Psi, and the Phi 
Delts, and will be broadcast over 
WMS. 

Cap And Bells - - - 

'50, Stovall, and Congdon have 
been elected to positions on the 
Cap and Bells Council to repre- 
sent the actors, and stage, light- 
ing and business staffs respec- 
tively. They will fill the places 
of Candler, retiring secretary Ger- 
See CAP and BELLS, page 6 



WHEN IN 



NORTH ADAMS 



SHOP AT 



The Style Shop 

North Adams 96 Main St. 



Luckl..' fine tobacco plcki you up when you're -mild, ripe, Ught tobacco. No wonder more independ- 

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to remember that Lucky &rKiKE Means Fine Tobacco leading brands combined! Get a carton of Luckies today! 

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BOSTON STORE 



PHONE 700 



Qiiit^ that mother will love 

MOTHER'S DAY MAY 8th 

Perfumes - - Qloves 
Costume Jewelry 
Handbags 
Lingerie 
Blouses 
Nylons 

GREETING CARDS by NORCROSS 



so free and easy on the draw 

eOPfl.t TH^AMKIIIOAN TOBACCO COHPAHf 




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THE WILLIAAAS RECORD, SATURDAY; APRIL 30, 1949 



Trackmen Cop 104y2 - 30y2 Verdict From Mltsg 



Meet Wesleyan 
In Little Three 
Opener Today 

Cards Buatit Balance; 
Brooks. Kuns Dashrs 



/; victory now within their grasp 
foUowlng Wednesday's 104)i-30M 
torpedoing ot Massachusetts, the 
Purple clad clndermen, take to 
-^^ .Weston Field this ^temoon a- 
'galnst Little Three rival Wesley- 
an. The meet, >hird of the season 
_. for the Ephs, Is scheduled to begin 
ir:'^ at 1 p.m, 

Wesleyan, like our own Eph 
-in^n, sports a live hundred aver- 
age in two meets this season. The 
/^Cardinals easily disposed of Coast 
Ouard In the opener, but last Sat- 
urday found themse;lves on the 
short end of a 74-60 score against 
powerful Springfield. Strongmen 
<i]ii the Middletown squad are Cap- 
tain Bin Brooks, who cllpps off 
the one hundred yard dash in 9.8 
seconds, and weightman Don Jof- 
fray. Against Coa^^t Guard Jof- 
fray broke the Wesleyan shot put 
record with a mighty 45'2)i" toss. 
Day ot Victory 
Against Massachusetts, Coach 
Plansky's charges really turned 
on the heat to capture all but one 



Hurdles Against Mass. 




Pete Moxwell and Freddy Smith getting off to a fait itart in the 220 
yard huidle event against the Univertity of Monachusett*. 



first. The Purple displayed over, 
whelming strength In the running 
events with Captain Bill Barney, 
and Kevin Delany again leading 
the way. Delany tunned in a re- 
markable 4:34 mile, while team- 
mate Barney held forth in the 
440 and 220 with times of 51.2 and 
22.9 seconds respectively. 

Sophomore speedster Pete Max- 
well had a fine day for himself 
with firsts in the low hurdles and 



NOW 
SEND HER FLOWERS FOR 

Mother^s Day 
May 8 




^^- 



CUT FLOWERS CORSAGES POTTED PLAINTS 

Flowers Telegt'ophed Everywhere 

Mt. Williams Qreenhoiises 

State Road, North Adams Phone NA 1954 



— Let us wrap & moil your Mother's Day gifts — 

Whitmans^ 

$1.50 — $4.00 

Cynthia Sweets 

$1.25 — $2.50 

Lovell &L Covel 

CANDY CUPBOARD $1.00 — $1.95 

Gales 

UNUSUAL fir DELICIOUS ASSORTMENT 
$1.75 



Perfumes and Colognes 



BY 



Chanel Lanvin C 



aron 



Elizabeth Arden Yardley 

Hart^s 

DRUQ STORE 



broad jump and s. second in the 
high hurdles. Ben Read was also a 
double winner with firsts in the 
high Jump, and high hurdles, and 
Tom Edwards was equally suc- 
cessful In copping two blue rib- 
bons in the field events. All in all 
the handful of fans who Journey- 
ed down to Weston Field for the 
meet were treated to a fine per- 
formance by the hard-working 
Planskymen. 

Summary 
120 yd Hich Hurdles: 1 Bead (W), 
2 Maxwell (W), 3 LaPorte (M) 
Time: 16.4 

MUe Bun: 1 Delany (W), 2 Cos- 
sar (M), 3 Hutton (W) time: 
4:34.0 

Pole Vault: 1 Pinkerton (W), 2 
Goulnlock (W), 3Nickerson (M) 
Height: 10'6" 

Two Mile Run: 1 Kelton (W), 2 
Szetela (M), 3 Cook (W) and Ess 
(W) tie Time: 10:26.2 
440 yd run: 1 Barney (W), 2 Wil- 
lis (M), 3 Bacharach (W) Time 
61.2 

Discus Throw: 1 Edwards (W), 2 
Flneman <M), 3 Detmer (W) Dis- 
tance 112'5" 

Shot Put: 1 Flneman (M), 2 Det- 
mer (W), 3 Zebryk (W) Distance 
44'4«" 

Broad Jump: 1 Maxwell (W), 2 
Read (W), 3 LaPorte (M) Dis- 
tance 19'10" 

220yd Low Hurdles: 1 Maxwell (W) 
2Smlth (W), 3 Molnahan (M) 
Time: 27.4 

100 yd Dash: 1 Brooks (Vf), 2 
Bacharach (W), 3 Barney <W) 
Time: 10.5 

Hammer Throw: 1 Ferguson (W), 

2 Mutlous (^), 3 Chapman CW) 

Distance: i29'6" 

880 yd Bun: 1 Smith (W), 2 De- 

laney (W), 3 Hopkins (M) Time; 

2:01.6 

220 yd Dash: 1 Barney (W), 2 

Bacharach (W), 3 Poltres (M) 

Time: 22.9 

Javelin: 1 Edwards CW), 2 Fine- 
man (M), 3 Anestls (M) Distance: 
157'6" 

High Jump: 1 Read (W) and 
Roller (W) tie, 3 Martin CW) and 
Tuhna CM) tie Height: 5' 9X" 



'52 Baseball 
Loses Opener 

A combination of three hits 
and three errors In the eighth 
inning enabled Hotchklss to score 
three runs and defeat the Fresh- 
man baseball team 4-1 in their 
first game' of the season Wednes- 
day. Chuck Harris, the Williams 
pitcher had hurled a two-hitter 
until that fatal frame, though his 
teammates had already been 
charged witlj four errors. 
' The lone Williams tally came 
in the top of the ninth when Jack 
Morrison, the first man up, reach- 
ed first on a walk and Elliot Bates 
connected for a long triple to cen- 
ter field. Bates, however, forgot 
to tag first base on his trip a- 
round the diamond and was put 
out, though Morrison had scored 
Hototakiss Scores First 

Hotchklss took the lead in the 
Qfth on an unearned run though 
it was in the eighth that the real 
damage vias done. The first two 
men were retired in order but 
suddenly the flood-gates opened 
and Hotchklss put the game on ice 



Eph Frosh Subdue 
Hotchklss Netmen 



Opening the season with a bang, 
the '92 Eph tennis team vanquish- 
ed Hotchklss 8-0 in an away meet 
last Wednesday. The Purple swept 
all six singles contests and won 
two doubles matches; the third 
doubles match was called In fav- 
or of dinner. 

Number one man Hank Norton 
whitewashed his opponent 6-0, 
6-0, but Pete Plckard had a tough 
fight in the number two spot be- 
fore he outlasted his opponent 
4-6, 8-6, 8-6. Bob Trone, next on 
the ladder, scored an easy 6-0, 
7-1 victory. 

Straight Sets 

Bob Rich, number four, tri- 
umphed 6-4, e-I, while Ray 
Oeorge shellacked his opponent 
6-1, 6-2. Brett Boocock was forc- 
ed into three sets before winning 
6-2, 3-6, 6-4, Norton and Trone 
won the first doubles 8-6, 6-3, 
while Rich and Boocock, in the 
number three spot, came from be- 
hind to triumph 3-6, 7-S, 6-0. 

An Amazing Offar by, 

HOLIDAY 

Plp» MIxhirm 

IW pip* diM RMT aMfea, «Mii_I)^INA, *. 

■Mdempipt, wlik brisbdrpoUikwl 




Lacrosse Team Faces Yale 
On Cole Field This Afiernooi 



Do Yon Remember? 

Remember the many thoughtful things your mother did 
for you as you grew up — making your birthday party 
something you'd never forget, letting you use the car 
when she felt like a movie, inviting your girl for that 
weekend you were coming home, sending you five dol- 
l5jrs when you needed it most. You don't forget these 
/things.i.T|;}g most appropriate way to show your love and 
appreciation is a really special gift on. ' - ' :- -W 

MOTHER'S DAY. MAY 8 - * .- ^ . ^ : ' 




Gentry 

WILLIAMSTOWN 
AtAUACmMCTTS 



• Agnew jewelry and bellHi 

• hand printed Kerchieft 

• hand tooled leather handbag 

• Inioid mahogany bowli 

• Bennington pottery 

WE MAIL ANYWHERE 



Blue Team Strong On 

Defunbc; Scores Point 

To Close Contest 



by Norm Wood 

Yale's big Blue lacrosse team 
invades Williamstown this after- 
noon to meet a Purple outfit on 
Cole Field at 2 p.m. In what 
should be the best home lacrosse 
game of the seasoiu. '.,.., ^„. 

Especially strong in the defense, 
the Yale ten has racked up a fair- 
ly impressive record thus far, and 
from all reports is a team which 
Williams w|ll have to go all out 
to beat. The home team will have 
to display a better brand of la- 
crosse than it has in its last two 
games if it is to win. 

Comparative Scores On Par 

Comparative scores for the two 
teams are about on a par in the 
games that can be Judged. Po- 
tent Navy trimmed the Ells 13-4, 
after having taken measure of 
the Ephmen, 14-3. In other 
games, Yale overcame Penn, 14- 
8, and handed the boys from CC 
NY a sound thumping, 20-8. __^ 

Under any conditions, Yale will ,, .T7Z ^ 

be tough, and Williams will have In the attack it iinu probably 
to play its best ball to take them. Hanford Smith, MacLetah, an| 
A Purple victory is necessary if Jim Herman. j 

the Ephs are to have any chance The Williams llheup should bji 
at the New England League Just about the same as last 8at>- 
crown. urday. The attack will be Pat Ora- 

Starting in the Yale nets ney, Ed Maynard, and (Sordf 
will be Treadwell, and Mc Williams, backed up by Fras« 
playing Just in front of him is Moffat, Shark Mayshark, md 
the strong defense of Win Love- Dave Van Alstyat. JtiUit ml£ 
Joy, Kim Yellott, and Savre. Mid- field it will b» PhU-.yM.AiwA, 
fielders for the Blue will be Bob Brumbaugh, and Captain Austy 
Timberman, ex-defenseman, cap- Taliaferro, secqodcd *j. Coke 8co- 
taln Marsh Binder, who scored field, , Bobby Day, O^^ Clark, 
three of the four goals against Ronnie Chute, John Sduttr, and 
Navy, and experienced Red Folan. See LACROSSE, page 6 



Coombsmen To ,Face 

St. Michael's xMy 

St. Michael's College of Win 
ooskl Park, Vt., wUl face' thi 
Williams baseball team on Wes 
ton Field at 3 pjn. today. Th( 
visitors lost their flrtt.Afwo^ 
games of the seiasqn to Ameri- 
can International college S-6 
and to An^betst, 12-1, on Fri-j 
day and Satuiiday ot last week { 
Reports from the borth Indi- 
cate that they have a bette: 
than average team this year, 
however. 

Oeorge Dltmar,. ace ot the 
Williams mound staff, probably 
will go to the hUl thU after 
liifon, if he -""x-" "*- ""tTntnt i 
Bowdoin game yesterday. He 
pitched six-hit ball in losing 
a tough one .to j^^e U^lvenity 
of Massachusetts, 3-1, a week 
ago. 

The Ephmen had dropped 
the bpening game of the sea- 
son to a strong jlrmy team at 
West Point, 10-8, on April 20. 




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You'll win the admiration oi 
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SQ4>ut this Gimpus Champ on 
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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1949 




ADD ALLURE TO 
HER ENSEMBLE 

WITH OUR FULL-FASHIONED HOSIERY 
IN NEW, EXQUISITE SPRING SHADES 

Kay's Specialty Shop . 

II Ml lAQLI ST. 
NORTH ADAMS 



MOTHER'S DAY 



IS APPROACHING 



ITS THE 




Colonial Watchman 
' Gift Shop "^"^ 



FOR QUALITY AND CONVENIENCE 

AT THE WILLIAMS INN 

LET US SOLVE YOUR GIFT PROBLEMS 
WITH OUR MANY SELECTIONS - *< 



• FANCY NOTI rAPIR 

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Chaffeemen Face Bowdoin,To 
Meet North Carolina Monday 



Southerners Rated 
Second In Nation 



Chances »re (trong that the 
WUUams tennis team will have 
emerged from their two moBt re- 
cent matches stiU retaining the 
.500 average they gained by top- 
pling Army 5-4 and bowing to 
Princeton 7-2. Yesterday, they 
faced a mediocre Bowdoln squad, 
while Monday's foe is powerful 
North Carolina. 

Both are home meets, scheduled 
for 4:00 on the Sage Hall Courts. 
Bowdoin, perenlally an ei^^y vic- 
tim for the Eph netmen, is not 
expected to have offered much op.> 
position. Coach Clarence Chaffee 
said that he may even use some 
of his second string players in 
the doubles matches to give them 
experience. 

North Carolina Loaded 

North Carolina will be a dif- 
ferent story, however; in fact, 
the Tarheels arerrated by some 
as the second most powerful ten- 
nis team in the ^country (out- 
shone only by William and Mary). 
The Purple tangled with them 
twice over Spring vacation in 
practice meets, losing ■ 12-2 the 
first time and 8-7 against a re- 
vised lineup. After this scare, 
it is probable that Selxas and 
company will not do any substi- 
tuting, in which case Williams 
will do well to win a single match. 



Frosh Golfers Drop 
Match To HotchkisB 

Th^ freshman golf team got 
its first taste of competition at 
Lakevllle, Connecticut on Wed- 
nesday and suffered an Vik-% 
loss at the hands of a good 
Hotchklss squad. Many of the 
matches were extremely close, 
however and the final score is 
not indicative of the respect- 
able showing made by the fair- 
ly mexperlenced yearlitigs. 
Last spring the frosh were 
downed by Hotc^iidss by a 6^- 
3)i margin. ■»; ,£■ j ,^- :-j:._ 

Frank McManus and Ted 
Taylor, the number one Eph 
foursome, tallied the loc(e half- 
point for Williams when they 
halfed best ball with the first 
Hotchklss foursome. Taylor, 
who had a thirty nine for the 
first nine holes lost a tough 
match two up and one to play. 
Rounding out the cub line-up 
were Bruce Brackenrldge, Jim 
Krill, Frank Kichelberger, and 
Laird Barber. Two and one was 
also the margin of Barber's loss 

An open date is next on the 
golfers' schedule and there are 
hopes that it will soon be fill- 
ed. Following that are matches 
with Amy and Amherst. 



Number three man Fred Scrib- 
ner will be out of the Bowdoin 
meet due to a kidney operation. 



Williams Finishes Second In Trout 
Derby Held By Amherst Outing Club 



In the first annual intercolleg- 
iate trout derby ever to be held 
in this country, a six man team 
representing Williams College won 
second place behind Amherst 
last Saturday and Sunday. Held 
at Amherst and sponsored by the 
Amherst Outing Club, the derby 



It serves her right! 



MARY JANE gives the telephone in her 
house a real work-out. 

But we're not worrie<J a bit. We know 
Mary Jane' s telephone is going to keep right 
on delivering good service year after year. 
Because the Bell System puts a lot of time, 
thought, and testing into making telephone 
equipment as rugged and trouble-free as 
possible. 

Tests are constantly under way at the 
Bell Telephone Laboratories. There, for 
example, new types of telephone instru- 
ments are put through a school of hard 
knocks. Dials and other parts are given 
strength and wear tests. Even the bottom 
of the telephone set has been designed 
and checked to make sure that it will not 
scratch or stain furniture. 

Such tests— on little things as well as on 
big things— help give you the world's best 
telephone service at the lowest possible 
cost 




Sailors Beat 
Army Team 
At Regatta 

Tie Score With Army 

At Finish Of Series 

Broken By Protest 



consisted of three events, dis- 
tance casting, accuracy casting, 
and actual fishing on the West- 
field River on Sunday. 

The Williams team included, 
Bill St. Clair, Donn Meeske, Nor- 
den van Home, Walter Pratt, 
Fred Logan, and Stuart Dalrym- 
ple. Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, 
Springfield, U. of Massachusetts, 
Princeton, and Amherst were al- 
so entered. 

Eph Lead Saturday 

In the first event Williams pick- 
ed up 30 points by Bill St. Clahr's 
placing third and Donn Meeske 
fourth, giving Williams second 
place. In accuracy casting St. 
Clair won top honors . with 15 
points, and Meeske won second 
with 14; Walt Pratt was tied for 
third with 12. This gave Williams 
first place in the event, and the 
Ephmen led at the end of the 
day with a total of SO points. 
Amherst and Dartmouth were 
close behind with 45 an* 40 re- 
spectively. 

On the following day Williams 
entered its other three fishermen 
which proved to be a mistake, as 
Meeske who was fishing for in- 
dividual points came with five 
nice trout, while the ofilcial team 
was skunked. Amherst took two 
fish for top honors, netting e- 
nough points to win the derby 
and the gold cup. Meeske and St. 
Clair, however, won second and 
third places for Williams in the 
individual honors and were 
warded with fly rods. Pratt, plac- 
ing tenth, won a fly book. 

Next year the derby will be 
held at WlUiamstown and will 
be sponsored by the Outing Club. 
It is hoped that the event will 
attract about fifteen colleges. 



by BUI MaoUy 
In three closely contested races 
the Williams sailors won the Tri- 
angulaiv Regatta at West Point 
last Saturday afternoon, lieating 
out Army and Syracuse. 

Sailing on the Williams Team 
were Commodore Bart Bardes '50 
(skipper). Bill Field '49, BlU Mac- 
lay '48 (slcipper), and Doug Bur- 
goyne '48 Taking to the boats at 
3 pjn. in a driving rain, the six 
crews made ready for the first 
race and at the startmg gun were 
losing ground against a strong 
out-going tide because of no wind; 
however, the wind soon picked up 
and the race was on with Wil- 
liams in the lead. Rounding the 
leeward mark and heading for 
the finish line, the fleet was con- 
fronted by a ferry-boat going up- 
stream and a tow of barges com- 
ing down-stream. The obstruc- 
tions managed to weave through 
the fleet, but so greatly to the 
latter's disadvantage that the race 
had to be called oS. 

WUUams, Army Tied 

Immediately afterwards, a re- 
sail of the first race was started, 
and, except for two protests that 
were later disallowed, the race 
was concluded, without imdue in- 
terruption, by Williams taking 
first and the two Army boats tak- 
ing second and third. The second 
race was saileduneventfully. Army 
taking first, Williams taking se- 
cond and third. But at the end 
of the last race after the trailing 
A^my boat was almost mowed 
down by a freighter, Williams and 
Army were tied for first place. 
However, Williams won a protest 
against Army and thus won the 
meet. The final score was Wil- 
lltuns, 31 points. Army, 27 points, 
and Syracuse, 21 points. The din- 
ghies were just put away In time 
to miss a line-squall which was 
alleged to have reached 40 miles 
an hour in the gusts. 



ROSASCCS TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

Air - fUil - Bu* ' Stcuni hip 

TBt.399 

90 Main Street North Aduai 




SUte Boad 

Between WiUiamatown and 

North Adams 



Lunchei - lee Cream 
Sandwiohe* 



BOOKS > , 

Moke fine 
MOTHER'S DAY GIFTS 

( May 8rii is Hi* date) 

All the current best-sell- 
ing fiction and non-fiction 
titles are on our shelves and 
we'll be happy to ship books 
onywhere for you. 



MOTHER'S DAY 
GREETING CARDS 



COLLEGE 

BOOK STORE 

Spring St. Raymond Woihbume 



/orMOTHERS 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




$ 



LOOKING FOR 
EASY MONEY 

WE BUY AND SELL 



$ 



. all those suits, jackets, etc. 

that you want to get rid of 

before vacation 

C t DTIUC '"' **'''*" ^ Center 
oAdIMoSh. - North 



IN NORTH ADAMS 
IT'S GIFTS 
FROM . «, 

MOHAWK 

GIFT SHOP 



Give Mother a gift which ihe will 
wear always with pride: a Longinea, 
"The World's Mort Honored Watch", 
or a Wlttnauet, shi;dy and depend- 
able, "the distiaguished companion 
watch to the honored Longinea io> 
over half a oentury" 

Longinea watches (rom $71. SO 
WittBauer watches from $39.75 

^ PrtCM inolud* F«tl«t*l l«x 



CHOKERS 



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EAR RINGS 



^COMPLETE LINE OF JEWELRY^ 



) 



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NORTH ADAMS 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1949 



TTT T' ^^^^^^ae^^^ 

MLIAILI SMVICI 

Join »ut lilt tf Miulat 
WilllfDM Cuiteman at , , 

KRONICK'S 
Esso Station 

Opposit* Howord Johrnon't 



^ 'Comment^ Subscription Drive 
Moves Along At Rapid Rate 



Life 



New Issue Highlights 
Student Art Feature 



As a result of the well-support- 
ed subscription drive sponsored by 
"Comment" during the past week, 
Circulation Manager Albert, Mc- 
Lean '51 announces that subscrip- 
tions tor the new college literary 
, magazine are piling up rapidly. 
Heading the representatives Ui' 
the various social organizations in 
selling subscriptions are Richard 
Weiland '51 and John McCombe 
■51. 

A special feature of the new 
-"Comment" \^lU.bg some fine art 
work by William Tattle '51 and 
Donald Rackerby '49, who gained 
high ratings in the recent "Com- 
ment" art contest. High points of 
the literary section of the forth- 
coming issue will include two in- 
teresting faculty articles by James 
M. Burns of the political science 
department and Samson L. Faison 
of the art department. 
Fiction 
Heading a large fiction section 
in this issue will be Albert Guer- 
ney '52'2 story "The Verge", 
which is a promising product of 
the freshman composition course. 
An intriguing story of Bermuda 
called "Batesta" is Donald Froeb 
'52's contribution to the mid-may 
issue. 

Russell Bourne '50 uses the work 
of T. S. EUiot as the basis for his 
highly controversial satire "The 
Case of the Anglicized Whimper." 
Kevin Moran '51 contributes two 



Marl(le Essay Wins 

Kepubiican Contest 

H. Carl Markle '49, has won 
the New York Young Republi- 
can Club's War Memorial Essay 
Contest. His essay "Should the 
Power of Congressional Inves- 
tigating Conmiittees be Restric- 
ted" was selected as the winner 
by unanimous decision of the 
judges. For his job he will get 
$100 of Republican money. 



LACROSSE - - - 

Dave Pynchon. Defensemen are 
Howie Simpson, Bob Donoho, and 
Marc Reynolds, with able assis- 
tance from Dave Young, Treat 
Arnold, Skip Dunlap, and Bill 
Coldwell. Mickey O'Connell han- 
dles the net-tending duties, fol- 
lowed by Phil Boote. 



poems to the title page, "Twi- 
light and White Walls" and "The 
White Rabbit Cloistered". 



STUDY RADIO 

...this summer! 

Many interesting, lucrative, jobs — 
now open — demand trained personnel, 
The National Academy of Broad- 
casting offers an intensive two-months 
summer course in professional radio 
writing and speaking. Write for rom- 
plcte information, now 

NATIONAL ACADEMY of BROADCASTING 

3311 leth St., N. w. 
WKhlngton 10, D. C. 



$2800 salary Is offered. 

Another Intefvlewer, Assistant 
Vice President W. D. Ryan from 
the United States Trust Company 
of New York, seeks single men un- 
der 25 for a twelve month train- 
ing program. The proposed sala- 
ry Is $2200 plus bonus and em- 
ployee benefits. 

Thursday, May 5 (afternoon only: 
The Personnel Officer of the Har- 
ris Trust and Savings Bank of 
Chicago, Fred L. Stone, will In- 
terview those men desiring formal 
training for four months to var- 
ious operating departments. From 
$200-$22S a month Is the salary 
offered, depending on age and ex- 
perience. 

Friday, May 6: The Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company of Nov 
York Is sending R. R. Bowman, 
the Manager of Division Personn- 
el, to interview seniors for sales 
and management training for New 
York, Pennsylvania, and New 
England at $215 a month. CA 
group meeting of seniors inter- 
ested in learning full details of 
the Goodifear proposition will be 
at the Placement Bureau, at 5:30 
on Thursday afternoon. May ^ 
Personal appointments are ixi 
Friday.) 

Men wanting training in mer- 
chandising will be interviewed by 
G. T. Skinner, a representative 
of Filene's of Boston. $35-50 a 
week is offered. 



WMS- 



Oh the basis of this gratifying 
piece of Information, WMS is or- 
ganizing an Intensive campaign 
both on and off the campus in 
order to demonstrate to the FCC 
that Independent student sta- 
tions, being of value to the col- 
lege community, should not be 
forced to close down because of an 
arbitrary ruling forbidding col- 
lege stations to support them- 
selves with Income from advertis- 
ing. 

At present the executive board 
of WMS is preparing a brief to be 
submitted to the FCC on June 1, 
1949, which it is hoped will war- 
rant public hearing on the whole 
matter. 



Chapel 



Faith 



one which tormented pedestrians 
up to 1858." As early as 1808; 
steam boats took passengers from 
Troy to New York in only thirty 
to forty-eight hours for a fare of 
ten dollars, thereby Unking North 
Adams to the outside world. A 
st^ge coach appeared in 1814, 
running between Albany and 
Greenfield, via WlUlamstown. 

Blessed with an abundance of 
hydro-eltlctric power and reason- 
ably good transportation to and 
from it. North Adams is hoping to 
expand by means of increased 
"Faith" ami^ctlvlty on the part 
of her people. 



Tel. 302-M 
Williamstown 



CHIMNEY MIRROR 

GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Morcella ond Frank Ikeler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 

Route 2 
Opposite Howard Johnsons 



Chapel service to see that it is 
conducted in an orderly fashion, 
to aid Chaplain A. drant Noble, 
and to dffer suggestions to him. 
Chosen as" Undergraduates who 
will command the respect of the 
student body, the committee mem- 
bers are: Charles Brashears 'SO, 
Schuyler Brooks '50, James A. 
Burbank '60, Stuart H. Cool '60, 
Richard Deane '50, Stuart Duf- 
fleld, Jr., '50, John Origgs '60, 
Andrew Heineman '60, Alexander 
Peabody, Jr. '50, John S. Prescott, 
Jr. '50, David Pynchon '50, and 
Henry Wlneman. 



Cap and Bells ■ • - 

aid P. O'Brien '49, Theodore liOh- 
rke '49, the retiring treasurer, and 
Howard Ersklne '49, the retiring 
actorls-.memteer,. fif^tlje council. 
Elections for the new secretary 
have not as yet been held. 



RARE OPPORTUNITY 

STUDY . . . TRAVIL 

in SPAIN 

Cottillon Group-Andaludan Group 

Baiqua-Cqtalan Orwip 

65 DAYS - - - $975.00 

DEPARTURES JUNE 29 to JULY 2 

Sponterad by: 

UNIVERSITY of MAORI i) 

For Infermatlan Write 

SPANISH STUDENT TOURS 

500 Fifth Ave, N.Y. 18, N.Y 



Get New Car Performance With a Brand New 
CHEVROLET POWER PLANT 



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(1936—1948 model* I 



1 . Motor Block Assembly 

2. Volvos 

3. Volvo Springs 

4. Volvo Keys 

5. Hood Gosket Set 

6. Pon Gosket Set 

7. Volvo Cover Gosket 



8. Timing Cover Sool 

9. Corburetor Kit 

10. Clutch Disc 

1 1 . Spark Plugs 

12. Points 

13. Condenser* 

14. Oil Change 



A new power plant in your old cor will give you the thrill of new cor 
performance . . . get new cor pep! Get new cor power! You'll sove 
gas ond oil. Take odvontoge of this omoiing offer. Stop in at Thomas 
McMohon & Son today! 

THOMAS McMAHON & SON 



73 Spring Street 



Williamstown 




BKAUSE THEY PREPARED FOR 
SMOOTH VACATION DRIVINO WJTH OUR 

Voe^thn Speeidi 

• adjust brol(es 

• adjust clutch 

• check steering 

• tune engine 

• inspect electrical 

system 

• lubrication 

• inspect tires 




HERBERT A. ORR CO. 

Curron Highwoy 
North Adams/ Moss. 



MAKE YOURS THE MILDER cigarette 



AFTER THE 

FLICKS 

IT'S THE 

THE RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Atonic 



SATURDAY 

Loretto Young .. Wendell Corey 

THE ACCUSED 

Feolure ot 6:40 - 8:45 

SUNDAY ■ MONDAY 

Olivia DeHavrlond Leo Genn 

THE SNAKE PIT 

Sunday Footui* 2:00, 4:10, 

6:20, 8:35 
Monday Footura 6:30, 8:40 



IT 



TVESDAT 



Technicolor- Spartf Thrills 

OLYMPIC GAMES — 1948 




MORE COltEQE STUDENTS SMOKE 
CHESTERFIELDS THAN ANV OTHER CiOARim 

y, « ' lY UTIIT HATIOMl llWm 

' ■ t- ■,' 





WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1949 



Price 1 cents 





Cards; Nine Wins, 6-3 



DelanyTopsThirty-Eight-Year 
Mark By Hitting 4:20.7 Mile 



I'urple Spike Weamen 

69^ 66 As Barney, 

Hurdlers Sitand Out 



By Ted Jonea 

WtlUams and Wesleyan slugged 
I out In the opener of Little Three 
track festivities Saturday and 
much to the delight of a large 
weekend crowd the hard-running 
Planskymen walked off the Wes- 
lon Field oval with a 69-66 win 
tucked neatly under their belts. 
The victory marked the first Pur- 
ple conquest of a Wesleyan track 
team since 1942. 

The Delany Mile 

There was no holding back as 
uoth teams threw all they had 
into an all out effort to win the 
meet. The exceedingly fast times 
in all events attest to this. By far 
the outstanding performance of 
the afternoon was the record- 
breaking 4:20.7 mile turned In by 
Williams' Kevin Delany.' Par out 
in front at the three-quarter mark 
u( the race. Delany really turned 
on the heat at the finish to break 
the tape a good 150 yards ahead 
of Wesleyan's Yordan, and in so 
doing he cracked a record which 
had stood for thirty-eight years. 
The previous fa.^test mile was h 
4:26.2 run by former Williams' 
track great P. L. Newton. This race 
wa.s one of the fastest collegiate 
miles In the East this year. 

The hard-working Williams' 
distance expert added further to 
his laurels by taking his second 
first of the afternoon In the 880 
yd race. 

PUnikymen Shine 

Although Delany's magnificent 
race in the mile won the most 
praise from the spectators, there 
were other fine individual per- 
formances which deserve note. 
Bill Qarney. Williams' Pentatha- 
lon starii^an his usuar top 440 race 
and his 50.3 time was the best 
turned In so far this season in 
New England. 

Pete Maxwell and Ben Read 
won the plaudits of all by copping 
firsts in the low and high hurdle 
events respectively. Read was ex- 
cellent In the hlg)i Jump also, 
where he and Stan Roller split 
a blue ribbon between them. 

Marty Detmer's strong right 
arm carried him to a first place 
45'3" shot put toss, and an up- 
set win over Wesleyan record- 
holder Don Joffray. 

Bill Brooks, captain of the Wes- 
See TRACKMEN, Page 2 



WCA Offers 
Jazz Session 



Best Local Musicians 

To Play Bop, Swing 



Plans are now being made for 
the second annual benefit jazz 
concert which will be held on 
Houseparty Saturday, May 14. at 
Jesup Hall In an effort to raise 
^unds for the Williams Christian 
Association. AssoclEJte Professor 
Roy Lamson and Wally Olesen '49, 
co-directors of this year's concert, 
have be«n combing, the WllUams- 
town-North Adams area recently 
to secure the services of the finest 
musicians available. Dixieland, 
bt)p and swing will be the three 
featured varieties of Jazz. 

Starting time will be 8 p.m. with 
the concert scheduled to last an 
hour and a half, thereby allowing 
the houseparty crowd td hear the 
concert and yet be able to attend 
the numerous house dances In the 
evening. Admission charge will be 
♦■6S for stags and $1.00 per cou- 
ple with details of the ticket sale 
to be announced at a later date. 




K«v Delaiwy.who ihottcred o thir- 
ty-eight ycor-old college record in 
the mile ogoinst Weileyon Soturdoy 
by covering the diitonce in 4:20.7 



Cap And Bells 
In Rehearsal 



.Annount-es Cast For 

Shaw, Wilder Plays 

The final dramatic production 
of the season will be presented 
on May 20 and 21, when Cap and 
Bells Inc. will offer George Ber- 
nard Shaw's "Androcies an)l the 
Lion " together with "The Long 
Christmas Dinner" by Thornton 
Wilder. The entire production is 
being directed by David Bryant, 
AMT head, with the assistance of 
James VanWart. The sets, which 
are extremely stylized, were de- 
signed by Otto Siebert '50. 

Rehearsals of "Androcies", a 
fable play in which Shaw cleverly 
deals with the subject of marty- 
dom in Roman times, have been 
underway since last week, and 
the following cast, to which mi- 
nor additions will be made, has 
been selected: Androcies, Domi- 
nick Dunne '49; Megaera, Kathy 
Munger; Captain, E. Robert Hel- 
laweil '50; Centurion, Larry Lewis 
'52; Caesar, Howard Erskine '49; 
Lavlnla, Helen Byrne Kelly; Fer- 
rovlus, Edward Stack P-'51; Spin- 
tho, John Laseil '50; Lentelus, Ar- 
thur Levitt '52; Metuiius, Albert 
McLean '51; Editor, Joseph Mc- 
Elroy '51; Retiarus, George Hop- 
fenbeck '51; Secutor, Joel Slocum 
'52; Ox-Driver, Peter Oaks '52; 
Call Boy, Loring Brace '52; Men- 
agerie Keeper, F. Burr Anderson 
'52; and The Lion, Andrew Bach- 
arach '51. 

Curtain Raiser 

A cast has also been chosen for 
the curtain raiser, and the part 
distribution for the Wilder play 
is as follows: Lucia, Francis Chaf- 
fee; Mother Bayard, Elizabeth 
Newhall; Roderick, Theodore Lo- 
hrke '49; Cousin Brandon, John 
Laseil '50; Charles, JoeW Slocum 
'52; Genevieve, Julia Hutchinson; 
Leonora, Eleanor Bloedel; Erm- 
engarde, Kathy Munger; Samuel, 
Arthur Levitt '62; Roderick, Gil- 
bert Mason '51; Lucia, Betty Ann 
Donnelly; and NurSe, Jeanette 
Folsey. 

Thomas Taylor '50 and Oil Ma- 
son are Itf charge of props and 
scenery, while WllUain Anderson 
'51 Is Director of Lighting. Cos- 
tume Heads are Betty Ann Don- 
nelly and Bemice Shalnman, and 
Make Up Is under the supervision 
of Ted Lohrke. Martin Luthy '61 
holds the position of Stage Mana- 
ger, and Gil Mason Is Assistant 
Stage Manager. 

Ticket Sale 

Theodore Congdon '51, who Is 
the Business Manager has an- 
nounced that the box ofBce will 
open Thursday May 12. 



Harter Lists 
'48 Officers 

Maynard, Mason Win 
Permanent Positions 



Following balloting conducted in 
the social units last week, Senior 
class president Alan Harter an- 
nounced the permanent class offi- 
cers for the class of 1948. 
Edwin Maynard III was elected as 
permanent President, John Mason 
III as Secretary. Tabulations for 
Class Marshall were not complete. 
The Class Agent by unanimous 
consent of the nominating meet- 
ing is W. E. "Pete" Geier. 

Spring Forma! In Gym 
UC President Andrew Heineman 
announced that there would be 
a ciean-up day on Thursday, May 
12. House presidents will organize 
house forces, while the Junior 
Advisors will take charge of the 
quad. Entertainment Committee 
Waiter Stem reported that next 
fall's dance will be sponsored by 
the Class of "52. 

John Griggs, president of the 
Junior class, announced that the 
formal on May 13 will be held in 
the gym. Plans for an outdoor 
dance behind AMT had to be ab- 
andoned after inquiries in Albany, 
Boston, and New York to procure 
a dat^ce floor fell through. The 
dance is still 9-2, with continuous 
music during the five-hour period. 
Students and dates may wander 
in and out of the gym at any time. 

Heineman pointed out that all 
motorcycles must be registered. 



Life Insurance 
Career Hailed 



Two Fields Described 
By Successful Alumni 

Selling Insurance is "the best 
paid hard work in the world" 
according to George Shoemaker 
'28, general agent for the Provl- 
[dent Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, who spoke at the Phi Delt 
house Monday evening. Ladd 
Piumley '25, vice-president of the 
State Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Worcester, joined Mr. 
Shoemaker in another of the lec- 
tures in the Vocational Guidance 
Series sponsored by the Placement 
Bureau and discussed the insur- 
ance "profession" from the stand- 
point of home office work- 
Mr. Shoemaker approached the 
work of an insurance salesman 
with an attempt to clear away 
prevalent misconceptions. Em- 
phasizing the opportunities of be- 
ing one's own boss, selecting cli- 
entele, advancement, and the 
field of management, he stated 
that an insurance career is a per- 
manent and stable business. 
Home Office 
Mr. Piumley described another 
branch of life insurance, home 
office underwriting subdivided 
into several branches. An under- 
writer must be able to distinguish 
a "good risk" from a poor one. 

Both gentlemen agreed that 
anyone interested in a career from 
which he will derive the feeling 
of accomplishment and of doing 
Bood for others should take "a 
I good look at the Insurance game" 



Wellesley Choir, Williams Glee Club 
CoiMbine To Present Superb Concert, 
Thrilling Large Chapin Hall Audience 



by S. H. Graybill, Jr, 

Saturday night, an enthusiastic audience of 500 was treated 
to an excellent joint concert by the Wellesiey College Choir and 
the Williams Glee Club. The finest singing was heard in the sepa- 
rate groups of each organization The combined works attest to 
the musicianship of every person involved in the last minute re- 
hearsals which are an Integral but hectic part of each concert. 
The "Requiem Aetemam" and^ 



"Kyrie Eleison" from the Mozart 
Requiem oiJened the program 
magnificently. Once or twice the 



approached in any other college 
activities. 

Palestrina's motet, "Tenebrae 



difficulty of the music and the i ^^^^^ g^^j,,^ ^^^ ^^^^ f^^^^^ ^^ 



size of the 150 voice ensemble pro 
duced a momentary sluggishness 
common in performances of this 
work. However, the whole effect 
was perhaps the high point in 
the combined singing of the two 
groups. 

Ladies Add Light Touch 

The Wellesiey Choir, under the 
direction of Mrs. Margaret Wink- 
ler, brought a light, springtime 
touch to the program with a 
group of folk-songs and works of 
modem American composers. The 
general character of all these 
songs was that of story-telUng 
which the young ladles accom- 
plished with superb diction. The 
lovely quality of the voices was 
used to good advantage in creat- 
ing the wonderful melodic lines 
of the folk tunes, especially the 
"Riddle Song", arranged by Mar- 
shall Bartholomew. The choruses 
from "Alice In Wonderland" by 
Irving Fine stood up well when 
compared to the renditions of 
similar songs by various members 
of the Williams faculty last year. 
The Wellesiey Choir was very ably 
accompanied by Susan Brailove 
and Sandra Pletman. 

Excellent Standards 

The five pieces by the Williams 
Olee Club were sufficient to con- 
vince the audience that the one 
appearance of the Qlee Club each 
year Is one of the more memorable 
occasions In the college year. This 
organization maintains standards 
of musicianship seldom found 
anywhere. These standarcjs of ex- 



monstration of singing on the 
program. The extreme difficulty 
in singing this work was not in 
the least evident in the Glee 
Club's very mature performance. 

The lively "Simon Legree" by 
Douglas Moore was so clearly 
enunciated that Mr. Barrow's 
reading of the difficult and leng- 
thy text was hardly necessary. 
The Club exhibited good diction 
and a wonderful sense of humor 
In telling about the mysterious 
liBgree. Mr. Nathan Rudnick, the 
Club's regular, excellent accom- 
panist, displayed brilliant tech- 
nique while Legree descended to 
the Devil. 

Williams' Songs Presented 

Mr. Barrow's arrangement of 
"When I See You" from the musi- 
cal play, "All that Glitters", pro- 
vided the unique opportunity of 
applauding the composer. Steph- 
en Sondhelm, '50, took a bow to 
the accompaniment of an extra 
burst of applause. Mr. Barrow's 
u.se of this song In the program 
was a fine tribute to Its compos- 
er's talents, and an opportunity 
to hear the song performed with 
the care It deserves. 

"Williamsiana" Enjoyable 

"Willlamslana", Mr. Barrow's 
fantasy of Williams songs, suc- 
ceeds In making these songs more 
interesting, and is the kind of 
music that everyone enjoys. 

The final combined numbers, 
worlcs by Delaney, Barber, and 
Elmore, reemphaslzed the twen- 
tieth century predominance In 
See WELLESLEY, Page 2 



Williams Defeats St. Mikes 

For First Victory Of Season 

\-.,_ 

by Steve Blaschke 

Not satisfied with a line-up which held a strong Bowdoin nine 
to an eleven inning 3-3 tie, Bobby Coombs found the right combina- 
tion in a revamped line-up which laid down an eleven hit barrage 
which combined with lefthander Harry Sutton's eight hitter re- 
suited in a 6-3 victory over St. Michaels at Weston Field last Sat- 
urday. It was the season's first win for the Purple as well as the 
initial starting appearance of first saeker Bud Cool, who led the hit- 
ters with a triple and double. 

O George Bush started proceed- 
ings early by doubling in the first 



WMS Fights 
FCC Decree 



Committet Chosen 
To Submit Brief 



As a result of the changes in 
rules governing college radio sta- 
tions contemplated by the FCC, 
Station WMS has launched an in- 
tensive campaign to combat en- 
actment of a rule barring com- 
mercial advertising from college 
radio. Such a regulation, accord- 
ing to the Station's Board of Di- 
rectors, would force WMS to cease 
operations. 

This proposal, along with va- 
rious others affecting campus sta- 
tions, was presented to the FCC 
April 13th. It is now up to WMS 
to prepare a brief containing a de- 
tailed analysis of its operations 
and status to the FCC before June 
!st. 

Peyser Leads Organization 

With so little time in which to 
gather so much information and 
contact so many people. Station 
President Frederick M. Peyser, Jr. 
'50, called full Station meetings 
last Wednesday and Thursday to 
organize for the task. "The Board 
of Directors has done its best to 
give the student body the kind of 
radio entertainment it wants," as- 
serted Peyser. "That was the pur- 
pose of our recent public opinion 
poll. Now the Station is in serious 
danger of being forced off the air. 
While we propose to continue our 
daily broadcasting to the best of 
our ability, we must devote even 
more of our time and effort to the 
present emergency. There is no 
room on the Station for anyone 
who is not prepared to devote a 
maximum of effort. While this is 
a drastic measure, I think that 
the seriousness of the situation 
wan-ants it". 
Burbank Motzer Head Committees 

Under the direction of James A. 
Burbank, II '50, and Carlyle T. 
Motzer '50. committees have been 
made responsible for the prepara- 
tion of reports dealing respective- 
ly with the technical and non- 
technical aspects of the Station's 
operation. Former Station Presi- 
dent Wallace Barnes, '49, and for- 
mer Technical Director Norton 
Cushman, '49, have agreed to as- 
sist in the project. 

The technical committees in- 
clude those making field inten- 
sity tests and an analysis of all 
technical operations, their chair- 
men being John L. Brown, IV '51, 
and John A Kadyk '51, respec- 
tively. 

Non Technical 

Th'B principle function of the 
non-technical committees is to ob- 
tain testimonials to the effect that 
Station WMS operates In the pub. 
lie Interest and docs not compete 
with commercial stations. The 
following are the chairmen of 
iheSe committees: George F. Che- 
rry '51, Public Service; Frederick 
P. Avery '52,Sponsor8; Stanley K. 
Pelrce, Jr. '50, College Adminis- 
tration; John P. Ferguson '50, 
Public Opinion; William D. Pink- 
ham, Jr. '51, Publicity. William A. 
McGregor '51, Station Relations; 
and Charles R. Albertl, Jr. 'SO, 
Political Relations. 



.^> 



and scoring on Stan DeLisser's 
single for the first Williams run 
which was neutralized by a St. 
Mike score in the second. Sutton, 
however, took matters into his 
own hands in the bottom of that 
inning by driving Fritz Zeller 
home with a single- The third run 
arrived in the third in the form 
of a line double by George Owen, 
followed by a tremendous cen- 
terfield triple off the bat of Pete 
Fisher, the new leftflelder. 
Cool Smacks Two 

Billy Hart, Billville's favorite 
son, drove in the other two St. 
Mike runs with a single in the 
fourth and a double in the eighth 
but otherwise it was pretty much 
Harry Sutton's show as he left 
14 Mikemen stranded on base. 
Bud Cool scored in the sixth when 
his long left double was followed 
by a hard hit two-baser by Zeller. 
Cool put the lid on in the eighth 
with a long triple which Zeller 
turned into a run with a squeeze 
bunt single. An error sent Zeller 
home withx the ballgame's sixth 
run after Fritz pilfered his sec- 
ond base of the day. 

Coach Bobby Coombs was the 
ballgame's unsung hero as he 
placed his outfielders so skillfully 
that time and again they did not 
have to move to snag hard hit St. 
Mike liners. The game's fielding 
gem came in the seventh when 
Fisher climbed the bank in left 
field to capture a St- Mike bid 
for a two run homer. 

Harvard Coming Up 

This afternoon the Coombsmen 
meet Harvard, an ivy league 
See Victory, Page 2 



GOP Honors 
Local Leftist 

Markle Gets Award; 
Republicans Get LaiTs 



New York Young Republicans 
laughed heartily last Thursday e- 
venlng at their 37th anniversary 
dinner, when they discovered that 
Williams' H. Carl Markle '49, 
winner of their War Memorial 
Essay Contest, was a member of 
the Progressive Party. 

In an interview with a Williams 
RECORD reporter, Markle stated 
that in his short speech accepting 
the $100 award, "I told them that 
the contest was a credit to the 
New York Republicans Club be- 
cause It "represented a living war 
memorial" and "because of the 
democratic way in which it was 
run." 

"I can testify to the (impartial- 
ity of the judging)," he told 
them, because I am a member of 
the Progressive Party and I voted 
for Henry Wallace In the last 
election." 

Markle "expected knives, forks, 
and plates" to come his way, but 
got laughter instead. "I didn't 
think the Republicans had a 
sense of humor," he stated. 

Judges for the contest, exrgov- 
emor Harold P. Stassen, Major 
General George P. Wyman. and 
Judge Brude Bromley were un- 
animous In t,helr selection of Mar- 
kle's essay. Bromley In making 
the award said that "Markle typ- 
ifies what Is best In young Amer- 
ican manhood today." 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1949 



Nor th Adorns, Massochus etis WiJIiomstown, Mossochusetts 

"Entered os second-class motter November 27, 1944, at the post office of 
North Adorns, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. iPublished 
Wednesdoy and Soturday dyring the college yeor. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Half, WiHiomstown, Telephone 72. 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) Editor 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 AAonoging Editors 

Norman S. Wood 50 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981-M or 33) News Editor 

Lorising G. Scofield '50 Sports Editors 

Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associote 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Blaschke, K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hastings. 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Moclay, H. Pickord, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. 
Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

John S Prescott Jr. '50 x Business Manager 

Edward L. Stackhouse 50 

Horry Frozier, III '51 ~- Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 ,. '^"'* Advertising Monager 

Edward C. Stebbins '51 ■ ■ CirculStion Monoger 

W. Robert Mill '51 :...-.:..:: Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Gonyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moii; H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovsky, W. Smith, W. Thomas. 



Fund Drive Not Major Problem; 
Must Change Psychology, Role 
Of Students III American Society 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 4, 1949 



Number 14 



Trainers 



At the baseball game Friday, a Bowdoin player was Injured 
sliding into third. Because there was neither a doctor nor trainer 
present, he was forced to lie on the field in pain, with no one knowing 
whether his ankle was broken or just badly sprained, while the 
coaches and managers debated as to whether he was in a condition 
to be moved. Finally, Phil Walsh and his beach fagon were called 
upon to remove the injured player to the infirmary, where it was, 
luckily, found that it was only a bad sprain. 

Things could have been much worse, however. Injuries aren't 
an everyday pccurance in baseball, but past experience indicates 
they certainly aren't uncommon. To remedy what might easily turn 
out to be a sad and embarassing situation for the college, arrange- 
ments should be made to have a trainer at each home game. For our 
opponents at away games, such a service is usually obligatory for 
them by the terms of the contract. 

Evidently lacrosse and Spring football have first call on the 
single trainer employed by the college, and this we can't disagree 
with, but it does seem logical that the added expense of paying Ken 
Rogers or some one else to attend the games would have worthier 
consequences than an extravagance such as the fencing team. 



by Richard B. Bilder 

Accovding to President Baxter, the major problem facing Wil- 
liams College this year is a flnancW one — The Fund Drive. The 
central object of this Fund Drive ^ that of securing money for the 
construction of new facilities and the continued maintenance of 
a flrst-rftte faculty. It Is my belief that the major problem facing 
Williams and all American colleges Is not the provision of better 
educational facilities, but rather the need for a complete change 
in the role of psychology of the student In American society. 

The role of the student in other parts of the world is a major 
one. He Is viewed as the vanguard of society, as the forward echelon 
of his nation, the growing point of the Body Social. He Is seen as the 
primary Inheritor of the traditions, values, and knowledge of his 
fatherland and the human race, and as the shaper of the future. 
He is the "elite potential" of his group and the main dynamic force 
in adjusting his society to the ever more complex challenges that 
modem civilization evolves. As such, this student is, generally speak- 
ing, intellectually and politically aware and active. He recognizes 
the great responsibility that rests upon him and makes his influence 
felt. 

Perhaps because of the historically more favored and Isolated 
position of the' United States in a world in calamity, the American 
student is in striking contrast to students abroad. His role In Ameri- 
can society is virtually insignificant. He is known for his house- 
parties, his "frats", and his football games. His opinions, naive 
idealism, and occasional pseudo-radicalism are amusedly tolerated 
by our people in general as the play of the lovable but unworldly 
"younger generation". He is a "kid" a "college boy", never taken and 
never taking himself quite seriously. He has little sense of his destiny 
or responsibility and, despite the constant lip-service to the' Idea, 
he has noawareness of himself as the architect of the future. Essen- 
tially he is an adolescent! 

"Osmosis Through The Skull" 

The specific attitudes of the American student towards education 
as exemplified at Williams derive from this general orientation. I 
believe they can be summed up in the following: 

1. Education as a passive process on the part of the student, 
a static assimilation by "osmosis through the skull" of a few 
key facts, ideas, and opinions necessary to economic and social 
"survival" in our pseudo-edijcatcd American society — rather 
than an active pursuit of knowledge and intellect as a primary 
personal responsibility. 

2; Education as a chore to be gotten over as soon as possible, 
and with the least possible work — rather than as a privilege 
and opportunity until recent times obtainable only by th^ 
very few. 

3. Education and the college degree as a means to economic 
and social success — rather than as an end in Itself in the seek- 
ing of the understanding that alone raises man above the animals. 

4. Education as a "conspicuous consumption", as something 
one "gets" to occupy his leisure time and to render him eligible 
to belong to a certain soctal stratum, i.e. "if you're not a 
college grad, yoii dpn't rate".." 

5. A general -hostility toward^ the student who does not abide 



Trackmen 



leyan team and one of the East's 
top sprinters, gave the Williams- 
town crowd a how it's done exhib- 
ition in the dashes, winning both 
the century and the 220. First- 
enberger was also a double win- 
ner for the Wesmen, as he took 
both the pole vault and broad 
jump events. 

The Ephmen get their chance 
to clinch the Little Three crown 
this Friday when they engage a 
better than average Amherst crew 
at Amherst. 

Summary : 

100 yd Dash: 1 Brooks (Wes), 2 
Wylle (Wes), 3 Bacharach (Wms) 
Time: 9.8 ' 

220 yd Dash: 1 Brooks (Wes), 2 
Wylie (Wes), 3 Barney iWms) 
Time: 21.9 

440 yd Dash: 1 Barney (Wmsi, 
2 Bacharach (Wms), 3 Shaw 
(Wes), Time: 50.3 
880 yd Run: 1 Delany (Wms), 2 
Smith (Wms). 3 Shelley CWes), 
Time: 2:01.1 

Mile Run: 1 Delany (Wms), 2 
Yordan (Wes), 3 Kathan (Wes), 
Time: 4:20.7 Breaks college rec- 
ord (4:26) held by Newton 1911. 
Two Mile Run: 1 Johnson (Wes), 
? Kelton (Wms), 3 Ess (Wms), 
Time: 9:56.3 

220 yd Low Hurdles: 1 Maxwell 
(Wms), 2 Schultz (Wes), 3 F. 
smith (Wms), Time: 26.3 
120 yd High Hurdles: 1 Read 
(Wms), 2 Maxwell (Wms), 3 
Young (Wes) Time 15.9. 
Broad Jump: 1 Plrstenberger 
(Wes), 2 Maxwell (Wms), 3 
Read (Wms), Distance: 21'5" 
High Jump: 1 Roller (Wms) and 
Read (Wms) tie, 3 Nelson (Wes), 
Height: 5' 8" 

Pole Vault: 1 Firstenberger (Wes) 
2 Qoulnlock (Wms) and Pinker- 
ton (Wms) tie, Height: 11 "3" 
Javelin: I P^« ^ffea), 2 Joflray 
(Wes), 3 Leete (Wes), Distance 
n5'2" 

D{|«cu«: 1 Stone (Wes). 2 Ed- 
wards (Wms), 3 Joflray (Wes), 
Distance: 122'7" 
Shot Pnt: 1 Detmer (Wms), 2 



Victory 



powerhouse at Cambridge's Sold 
iers field. Purple Aces Ditmar or 
Sheehy will be on the mound in 
what promises to be one of the 
toughest games of the year. Wil 
liams' unexpected show of power 
plus Wesleyan's unbelievable 7-0 
upset win over Amherst seems to 
indicate that one of the toughest 
Little Three strugles in history is 
about to ensue between three vir 
tually even teams. 

Line Up 





ab 


r 


h 


Bush, 2b 


5 


1 


1 


LeSage, ss 


5 





1 


DeLisser, 3b 


4 





2 


Owen, rf 


3 


1 


1 


Healy,cf 


4 








Lynch 











Pisher,lf 


4 





1 


Mason 











Cool,lb 


4 


2 


2 


Zeller, c 


3 


2 


2 


Sutton, p 


4 





1 


Totals 


36 


6 


11 



Wellesley - - - 

the program and contrasted with 
the other combined works from 
the Mozart "Requiem". 

As predicted by the "Record" 
editorial in the April 30 issue, 
student response was small, but 
those who came had a wonderful 
time. The reason for the' Glee 
Club's single appearance each 
year in Wllllamstown Is obvious 
when expenses for such a concert 
are considered. 

On May 12, the Williams Glee 
Club will present a sOlo concert 
in Town Hall, New York, ending 
the most ambitious season In the 
Club's history. 



Joflray (Wes), 3 Pyne (Wes), 

Distance: 4S'3" 

16 lb Hammer Thraw: 1 Johnson 

(Wes), 2 (3hapman (Wms), 3 

Ferguson (Wms), Distance: 139'; 

4" 



by this pattern. 



'i 



'Gentlemen's C" 



This last point is a very interesting one, not only because it is 
so widespread and reveals the ■ powerful pressures towards con- 
formity in our supposedly individualistic American society, but 
because it offers a valuable insight into the immaturity of American 
students in general. The intellectually curious student, or the student 
who sees education as a privilege or responsibility — call it what you 
will — is put under social stress. The student who excels in his 
studies has broken the student taboo which calls for mass medio- 
crity, i.e. "the gentleman's C". He is "raising the standard", or 
"making it tough for his buddies". He is a "bug", an "eager beaver", 
an "apple polisher". A cardinal offense is to be seen talking to pro- 
fessors^ who are viewed as "speaking machines", to be politely 
greeted upon meeting on the street but strictly ignored outside (and 
sometimes inside) of class when the "machine" becomes an indivi- 
dual — although the personal relationship possible between teachers 
and students at small colleges is the supposed high point in their 
favor. The result of this attitude is that the "intellectually curious 
student" ^- if I may be allowed to use the term — assumes the 
character of a rebel against the school society, with all the liiipllca- 
tions thereof both on the student body and the individual himself. 

Adolescent Attitudes 

I would maintain that these attitudes are not only adolescent 
as forming a gross perversion of the very purpose of education as 
exemplified in foreign countries, but, more imiJortant, are potentially 
dangerous to the United States and to a World which is increasingly 
being forced into dependence on American ideas, capabilities and 
leadership. We have viewed education basically as the mass produc- 
tion of minimum standar'dized intelligences. In our idea of general 
education as a "cure-all' for the problems of our democracy, we have 
neglected to note that democracy requires not merely literate people, 
but also thinking people. Unfortunatelq, the American educational 
system does not produce many of these! 

Some historians maintain that Western Culture has reached its 
senility and must die. I prefer to believe that rather we are passing 
through the growing-pains of adolescence, and that before our 
civilization lies the stability and potential happiness of maturity. 
The threshhold is before us. We have but to step through the door 
to reach the Utopias that modern science and intellect have made 
See STUDENT, Page 4 



YOUR DATS WILL LOVE IT 

Forget the clock gt the Bilfmore, its olci, stuff . Today 
it's the Ladles Cocktail Lounge and Dining Room at 
the Williams Club. Fine food and drink in sharp sur- 
roundings. 

24 East 39th Street is "on campus" in Manhattan, 
but with a difference. Rooms overnight for undergrad- 
uates at special rates; Bar and Grill under the super- 
vision of the famous John; theatre ticket service by 

%he Williams eiuh 

24 East 39th St., t«Iew York City j 

,-- Undergraduates are always welcome! 
ItVYoto *' ' 



New Summer Format Jacket 




News of the amazing comfort and freedom of our soft 
constructed formal jacket has brought us hundreds oi 
customers. It takes something really different one. 
worthwhile to win such a farflung following. The tren( 
to more casual evening weor is something to write homj 
about. ABOVE MODEL IN RAYON 

$35.00 

Williams Co'Op 

Gentlemen's Apparal 
Williomitowii, Mots. -^ 



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Tel. 302-M 
Williomstown 



GUEST HOUSE AND CABINS 
Morcello and Fronts ll^eler 
OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND 



Route 2 ' 
Opposite Howard Johnsoni 




For the. we^tndi 
Varties - - - 

MAKE YOUR MILK PUNCH 
THE BEST! 



USE ONLY BORDEN'S MILK & ICE CREAM 
AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

2 1/2 and 5 Gallons at low prices 

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WILL SHOW 

A complete selection of 
apparel furnishings and accessories 



for university ihen 
on 



THURSDAY - MAY 5th 

AT 

THE WILLIAMS INN 

Representative HAROLD ROGERS 



:V.: 







' • ' ■• THE WILLI AAAS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1949 



PurpI* Anaekmon Gordy McWilliami, behind Po» Gronay (No. 33) 
just miiMt Koring. ( Boll ijl, on Ht» neor lida of the neti, just obove goalie's 
feet). 8ux Brumbaugh is in background. Yale Won, 7-4. 

Williams Lacrossemen Drop 

7-4 Decision To Yale Team 



By Coke Sooflfcld 

Even though the Williams stick 
men outplayed Yale In the first 
naif, and played the visitors on 
•ven terms during the second half, 
failure to find the edge In the first 
iwo periods spelled/ defeat at the 
hands of the Bulldogs, 7-4, Sat- 
urday afternoon /on Cole Field. 

Trailing 3-0 at halftlme, the 
Ephmen matched Yale's four goals 
in the second half, but could not 
overcome the / advantage. First 
blood of the game was drawn by 
Hanford Smith after six minutes 
of the first quarter on a pass from 
Dick Reeve. At the opening of the 
.second stanza, the Blue executed a 
beautiful play which caught Wil- 
liams off /guard and Thompson 
converted L pass from Red Polan 
into a goal. MacLeash scored 
Yale's third goal near the end of 
the halfy 

/ Purple Tallies 

At the start of the second half, 
Yale defenseman Win Lovejoy 
was given a penalty for holding, 
and the Purple made use of the 
extra/man as Ed Maynard passed 
to B6bby Day for the first Wil- 
liams tally. MacLeash countered 
wltn another goal for the, visitors 
and Van Dusen scored for the 
Pojitermen after seven minutes of 
the period had elapsed. Two more 
Yale goals by Smith and Jim Her- 
n>an closed out the .scoring In the 
third quarter. 
/ Williams scored again when 



Mark Reynolds carried the ball 
from his defense position and flip- 
ped It to Maynard for the sixth 
Purpie goal. Yale's Binder and 
Van Dusen each scored to make 
the final count 7-4. 

The game was rough, with Yale 
being charged with eleven minutes 
of penalties while Williams had 
nine. The goalies for both teams 
played excellent lacros.se, with 
Williams Mickey O'Connell Stop- 
ping nineteen of the visltoi-s' shots 
while Treadwell of the Blue had 
See LACROSSE, Page 4 



Frosh Trackmen Win ; 

Brody Leads Victory 

Placing first In twelve of the 
fourteen events, the freshman 
track team had no difficulty In 
winning Its first meet of the 
season, as It trounced the Mass. 
State freshmen 821i to iSH, last 
Thursday afternoon at Am- 
herst. Highlighting the fine 
performance turned In by 
Coach Plansky's charges. Jack 
Brody proved his versatility by 
garnering 21 points In five e- 
vents. Brody took first place 
honors in the 100, the 220, the 
discus and the broad Jump, and 
also placed third in the shot 
put. Also outstanding was 
Qeorge Stelnbrenner who won 
both the high and low hurdle 
events. 



Deerfield Tops 
Frosh Tennis 



Getting their first taste of top- 
notch competition, the freshman 
tennis team bowed 9-0 to a highly 
superior Deerfield outfit, Thurs- 
day afternoon on the Sage Hall 
courts. Number one man Hank 
Norton, and Pete Pickard, playing 
In the number three slot, each 
managed to win a set from his op- 
ponent, but the remaining four 



Netmen Blast 
Bowdoin, Bow 
To N. Carolina 



Robinson-Thurber Duo, 
Scribner Win Against 
Tarheels; Frosh Lose 



After drubbing a mediocre Bow- 
doin squad 7-2 on the Sage Hall 
courts Friday, the Purple racket- 
men succumbed to North Carolina 
Monday In the same place by the 
same score. Winning two matches 
from the vaunted Tarheels, how- 
ever, was a more worthy accom- 
plishment than taking seven from 
a Bowdoln aggregation which 
seemed about the caliber of the 
Deerfield boys who vanquished 
Coach Chaffee's frosh 9-0 on 
Thursday. 

Fred Scribner tallied the lone 
Eph singles victory as he scored 
repeatedly with serve and volley 
against North Carolina's number 
three player, who looked like he 
had never see the American 
Twist before. Selxas and Taylor, 
See TENNIS, Page 4 



singles and three doubles matches 
were all decided In straight sets. 
Saturday Coach Chaffee's yearl- 
ing squad will face Kent at home. 



Purple Nm§ Stops Powerful 
Bowdoin Team With Tie^ 3-3 



Yachtmen Take Sixth 
At Brown 'Regatta 

Taking sixth out of eight 
competing colleges at Brown 
University last weekend, the 
Williams sailors received valu- 
able experience towards the 
New England Finals at Coast 
Ouard next weekend. 

The Williams two crews con- 
sisted of Gus Clary '51, Bob 
Klmberly '52 (skipper), Bart 
Bardes '50, and Bill Maclay '52 
(skipper). After the first six 
races out of the twelve sched- 
uled races Williams was in 
fourth place. Four races were 
resailed in which Williams 
dropped to sixth. The final 
dropped to sixth. 



Eph Linksmen 
Prove Steady 

Golfers Down Bowdoin 

Hamilton; Marchese, 

Kodie Botii Get 74's 



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oil those suits, jackets, etc. 

that you want to get rid of 

before vacation 



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MOTORCYCLES 
$365 to $79S 



BICYCLES 
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SERVICE fr ACCESSORIES 

BICYCLES RENTED 

Rebuilt trade-in bicycles 
$13.75 



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NORTH ADAMS 



Outclassing their second and 
third opponents of the season, 
Dick Baxter's golfers scored easy 
victories over the Bowdoin and 
Hamilton golf squads on Friday 
and Saturday of last weekend. 
The Eph linksmen. with three 
straight wins on the home links, 
have yet to lose a point in any 
match. Bowdoin College received a 
10-0 drubbing as Williams swept 
the seven singles and the three 
doubles combinations. Bucky Mar- 
chese and Captain Jerry Cole won 
handily at number one and two 
by six and five. Marchese was 
shooting even par when his match 
ended. Chuck White, number 
three, took a strong 8-6 decision 
equalled by Bill Rodie's six up and 
five to play win from Bowdoin 
The last three individual matches 
were swept by Dick Heuer, Kim 
Whitney and Ted Quinlan. 

Marchese, Kodie Shine 

In the best ball, Marchese and 
Cole took the first foursome by a 
5-4 count, only to be bettered by 
the Whlte-Rodie and Heuer 
Whitney combinations which 
posted six and five triumphs over 
the Polar Bears. 

Against Hamilton Saturday the 
torrid duffers. 9-0 victors, dis 
played finer form. Marchese and 
Rodie, who have been playing the 
most consistent good golf to date 
carded 74's to lead the individual 
See GOLF, Page 4 




Eleven -Intiing Deadlock 
Stopped By Darkness; 
Eph Hurlers Effective 

By Blair Perry 

Williams and Bowdoin battled 
to a three-hour, eleven inning 3-'J 
tie in their varsity baseball game 
on Weston Field Saturday after- 
noon and eveping. The contest fi- 
nally was called because of Im- 
pending darkness, after Bowdoin 
had left 16 men on base and Wil- 
liams had stranded 11. 

Three pitchers — Harry Sheehy, 
Bob Olsson, and George Dltmar 
were the whole show for the home 
team. They hurled effectively In 
tight spots, but got little batting 
support except their own. Sheehy 
drove in two runs with his single 
in the fourth, and Dltmar collec- 
ted another of the four Williams 
hits, a single in the eleventh. 

With t)etter fielding support, 
Bowdoin starter Lloyd McDonald 
might have had a two-hit win in 
the regulation nine Innings, but 
he was handicapped by mediocre 
inflelding and his own wildness. 
Bernie Johnson finished up and 
allowed two more hits In the two 
extra innings. Bowdoin connected 
for eleven scattered hits. 
Sheehy Connects 

Sheehy set the visitors down 
without trouble in the first three 
innings and gave up a run in the 
fourth on a walk and two singles.- 
.Jimmy Waugh's glove-hand stab 
of Decker's liner prevented fur- 
ther scoring. 

Williams snapped right back to 
go ahead 2-1 in the bottom half 
of the inning. Ray Mason. Ralph 
Mason, and Zeller walked to load 
the bases with two out and Shee- 
hy on deck. Big Harry poked the 
first pitch toward Burke at sec- 
ond and the ball went past him 
on a big hop to score two runs- 

The Ephmen added another in 
the fifth. With two away. Stan 
Dellsser reached second on an 
overthrow and took third when 
McDonald threw into center field 
attempting to pick him off. Stan 
crossed the plate as Ray Mason 
forced Owen at second. 
Olsson Shines 

Bowdoin filled the bases on two 
walks and an error in the fifth, 
but a double play ended the inn- 
ing' When Peehan's line drive 
single put men on first and third 
with none out in the next stanza, 
Sheehy gave way to sophomore 
Bob Olsson. Olsson fanned the 
next two men and got the third 
out on a fly ball, in an Impressive 
display of relief pitching. 

The visitors picked up single 
runs in the seventh and eighth. 
Rosse reached base with one out 
in the stretch inning, took second 
on an infield hit. and scored on an 
infield force play. Dltmar then re- 
placed Olsson on the mound, vflth 
the score 3-2. 

Third baseman DeLisser turned 
' See BOWDOIN. Page 4 




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■'•■• •■•:■'': ■■■■ '^t>^^:*- . ^ ■ -x;, /'■; 

-THE WHl^LIAMS RECORD, \\ifiW5§eAy- MAYrH,'l949 



/"■- 



c.''p,. 



^men'cs's 

In anybody's book, ono of thorn 
ii Joteph H. Axelrod. $aid TIME 
last yoar: 



Joseph H. Axelrod, 31, was one of 
Ihq first New Enghnders to have a 
telephone in his automobile. He needed 
it.' As boss of six textile mills in four 
cities in Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, plump, hustling Joe Axelrod 
•made the rounds every day, and he 
liked to keep in touch. Last week, Joe 




J. R, KELLY, Woon\ r.ot Rhode Island 

Joe Axelrod 
A car telephone is needed. 

Axelrod added a lifth city (Provi- 
dence) to his tour, a seventh plant 
(the Uamar Wool Combing Co.) to 
his holdings. Even for a young man 
who likes to keep moving, .\xelrod had 
moved far. In ^'/i years he had par- 
layed $5,500 into an integrated textile 
empire worth $16 million. 

Joe started to work in ujjS, when 
he was just out of the L'ni\'ersity of 
I'cnn.sylvania. To his $500 savings, his 

' father, James, a textile jobber, added 
$5,000. With the money, they formed 
.Airedale Worsted .Mills. Inc. with Joe 
as president. They rented a loft in a 
Woonsock'et (R.I.) mill, bought some 
secondhand machinery, hired two 
workers and started weaving worsted 
fabrics. 

The Team. Joe made the goods; his 
father sold them. Selling was no trick 

' when war came; the trick was produc- 
tion. Joe lurned ii by picking up ihe 
newest textile machines, applying the 
newest techniques, and plowing all 
profits back into more plants, Joe's 
aim was integration — enough plants to 
handle wool virtually from the sheep's 
back to finished cloth. In 11)42 Aire- 
dale Worsted Mills, Inc, was healthy 
enough to take over Woonsocket's 
Bernon, In the next three years the 
.■\xelrods wove the Jeffrey finishing 
Co,, Woonsocket's Lippitt Worsted 
Mills and Dorlexa Dyeing & Finish- 
ing Co, and I'awtuckel's Crown 
Manufacturing Co, into their em- 
pire. Last spring they got control of 
New Bedford's old, famed Wamsutta 
Mills (sheetings, broadcloths, ,spe- 
cialty fabrics). Joe and his dad. who 
is treasurer, now have 3,150 men & 
women (including Wamsu(la) work- 
ing for Ihem, and with last week's 
buy, they reached Joe's goal of in- 
tegration. 

Successful Business- 
man Axelrod reads 
TIME each week — as 
do more than 1,500,- 
000 other U.S, college graduates who 
. find in TIME the news they can't af- 
ford to miss. 

To enter your subscription to 
The Weekly Newsmagazine, 
see any of TIME'S representa- 
tives at Williams College - 
Barry Benepe, Sigma Phi Place 
- College Book Store. 




Student • • - 

possible for a socially adult man- 
kind. Whether we make that step 
or not depends more and more 
each day on the ability of Ameri- 
can students as future leaders to 



Tennis -" 



probably the top doubles bpam. in 
the East, quickly overpowered 
Scribner and Charlie Schaaf, but 
the Tarheels' second duo was 
somewhat less expert and couldn't 
match the steady play of Wil- 
liams' watch-charm pair, Robin- 
son and Thurber. 

Bowdoln Summary 

Robinson ,(W) beat Fleming 
(B) 6-0,6-3; Schaaf (W) beat Ro- 
sander (B) 6-0, 6-2; Palmer (W) 
beat Foster (B) 8-2, 6-2; Hebb 
(B) beat Treman (W) 1-6, 7-5, 
6-2; Thurber(W) beat cay (B) 6-1, 
6-2; Kent (W) beat Hallet (B) 
6-2, 6-1, Takamine-Riegel (W) 
beat Fleming-Rosander (B) 6-1, 
6-3; Hebb-Foster (B) beat Pal- 
mer-Treman (W) 6-2, 6-1; Fran- 
kenheimer-Muller (W) beat Cay- 
Taussig (B) 0-6, 6-4, 6-2, 
North Carolina Summary 

Seixas (NO beat Robinson (Wi 
6-3, 6-3; Taylor (NO beat Schaaf 
iW) 6-4, 7-5; Scribner (W) beat 
Gruner (NO 9-7, 6-4; Rice (NO 
beat Palmer (W) 6-3, 6-3; Wilder 
(NO beat Treman (W) 7-5, 6-1; 
Winstead (NO beat Thurber (W) 
6-4, 6-2. Seixas-Taylor (NO beat 
Scribner-Schaaf (W) 6-1, 6-3 Ro- 
binson-Thurber (W) beat Grun- 
er- Winstead (NO 6-3, 4-6, 6-4; 
Rice- Wilder (NO beat Palmer- 
Takamine (W) 8-6. 6-3. 



realize and solve the problems 
that face us. , . ' 

It is time to break these old 
patterns and assert as our ol^- 
Jective the intellectual undfer- 
sttfidln^ and capacity that mrust 
be the aim of the student in a (de- 
mocratic society. As students we 
must abandon our intellectual ad- 
olesceiice and become aware of 
the potential role and responsibi- 
lity which history places upon us. 
Without this reorientation, not 
only college fund drives, but all of 
our hopes for personal happiness 
and security — indeed survival — 
become pointless In a world in 
which events move remorselessly 
onwards towards a catastrophic 
climax ! 



LacfQSse 



Fort Massachusetts 
Restaurant 



Serving Dinners and Evening 

-Snacks from 5:00 P.M. to 

12:00 Midnite Doily 



Buffet Suppers on Monday 
Nitei OS usual 



TELEVISION NIGHTLY 



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COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



Route 2 In North Adams 
Coll 770 for Reservations 



twelve saves. The extreme heat 
told on the players during the sec- 
pnd half as the game became more 
ragged and the pace slowed. The 
stickmen played their best game 
of the regular season to date, Ho- 
wie Simpson, Mark Reynolds and 
Captain Austin Taliaferro having 
Improved greatly over their two 
previous appearances tmned in 
outstanding performances for the 
Ephmen, 

The Lineup: Williams: Attaok- 
Maynard, McWllIlams,. Graney, 
Moflatt. Mldfleld - Taliaferro, Van 
Dusen, Brumbaugh, Chute, Day 
Scofleld, Clarks, Schluter, Pyn- 
chon, Fish. Defense - Simpson, 
Reynolds, Donoho, Young, Dun- 
lap, Goal- O'Connell 



Golf - 



golfers. MarcHese won by six and 
five while Rodle came through 
with a seven and six win. Cole 
nicely posted a seven and six de- 
cision also. White, H^uer and 
Whitney completed the Williams 
landslide with very little trouble. 

Marchese and Cole handed the 
visitors a five up and four to play 
doubles defeat and the Whlte- 
Rodie foursome saw the Purple on 
lop by six and five, 

Frosh Surprise Dartmouth 

A very unexpected upset of the 
Dartmouth freshman golfers was 
maneuvered by the Eph yearlings 
on Saturday. The final score was 
a close 5-4. Frank MacManus and 
Ted Taylor, number one and two 
for Williams, showed the way by 
winning their hard fought singles 
as well as best ball. 



Bowdoin - 



Qraff's bouncer Into a force at the 
plate and Zeller's throw caught 
Feehan off third after the Po- 
lar Bears again got three men on 
in the ninth. Roase's triple ip the 
tenth also was wasted as Dltmar 
bore down to get the last two men. 
Both teams had men on base In 
the eleventh, after which umpire 
Burns called the game, sensing 
that darkness would make ano- 
ther full inning impossible. 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

TIME TO EAT & THE. PLACE 

TO EAT IS THE 

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Feature ot 7:00 - 9 ) 

SATURDAY 

The Marx Brotho 

A NIGHT 
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Feature at 6:45 - 8:' 



NOW SHOWING AT 



MOHAWk THEATRE 

NORTH ADAMS 



MGM s TECHNICOLOR musical 

Frank Esfher Gene 

SINATRA WILLIAMS KELLY 
TaJkeMieOuifo 
the Ball Game' 



BETTY GARRETT ■ juifs munshin 



lOWAtD ARNOID 



pg^ "DESIGN FOR DEATH" 

'*^ Jopon's Plans For Conquest 



Scritn Play by HARRY TUGEND anil GEORGE WELLS • Story by GENE KELLY and STANLEV LONM 
DireOtd hy %\JSi1 BEKKELEY • Produced by ARTHUR FREEH 



Tops with the Top Stars in Hollywood and with Colleges too-- 



STEELE and WILES 
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COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
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Telephone 499-M 
41 Williomstown 

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Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can ret the out- 
standing news of the day every 
everiinK throuch the full leased 
wire Associated Press service in 

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North Adams, Man. 
On sole at 5 p.m. on all 
Wiiliomstewn Newsstands 



iiti, 





:ij*K-t!g;i^;;;i;pf - 



Volume LXIII, Number 15 



WMS Preparing LongjReport 
On Operations As Campaign 
Against FCC Ruling Intensifies 




3^^^0 




SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1949 



Price 1 cents^ 



Baxter^ Others 
Write Letters 
AttestingValue 

WMS's high-powered cam- 
paign to avert a possible Federal 
Communications Commission rul- 
ing banning commercial advertis- 
ing on low-power radio stations 
has reached a peak of activity, 
according to station president 
Frederick Peyser '50. 

If the regulation is passed by 
the FCC, it will force, WMS to 
cease its operations. The various 
committees which have been set 
up to prepare a report presenting 
tlie arguments of the station are 
sending out letters and making 
personal contacts in the most con- 
centrated period of activity in the 
station's history. 

Officials Help SUtion 

Letters are expected from Pres- 
ident Baxter, College Treasurer 
Makepeace, Professor Newhall, 
Dean Brooks, Admissions Director 
Copeland, and Dean Keep, attest- 
ing to the value of the station to 
Williams College. According to the 
station's board of directors, the 
support of the Administration, 
plu.s general student support will 
be big factors in WMS's fight for 
life. 
Petitions have been circulated in 
the .social units giving the student 
body an opportunity to back up 
the desire for a local station ex- 
pressed in the recent WMS poll. 
The response to these petitions 
lias thus far been excellent. 

Sponsors Testify 

In stating the position of WMS. 
Pey.scr declared that "the Federal 
Communications Commission be- 
lieves the Intercollegiate Broad- 
rasting Service is a spokesman for 
all college radio stations. However, 
many college radio stations, in- 
cluding WMS, do not belong to 
IBS and do not agree with the 
stand taken by that organization ' 
IBS has argued that commercial 
advertising on low-power college 
stations "competes with commer- 
cial stations. " 

In an attempt to refute this ar- 
Kument, WMS is gathering testi- 
monials from its sponsors saying 
that advertising on the station 
does not compete with either Ben- 
nington or North Adams stations. 
Contrary to the implications of 
the FCC ruling, "WMS works in 
close co-operation with the North 
Adams station," Peyser stated, 

WMS is obtaining letters from 
See WMS, Page 2 



Phi Gams Victors 
In Fralernily Sing 

Semi-Finals Scheduled 
To Be Held May 23 



The Phi Oamma Delta octet 
was unanimously chosen victor 
over those of Phi Delta Theta 
and Zeta Psl in last Monday 
night's round of the Interfrater- 
nity Sing held in the Studio The- 
atre of the AMT and broadcast 
over WMS. 

The winning team included 
Richard Bowers '50, and Richard 
Walters 'hi, first tenors; Robert 
Cremln '51, and Walter Palmer 
'52, second tenors; Robert Riegel 
'52, and John Walters '50, first 
basses; and Don Rogers '50 and 
Tennyson Schad '52, second 
basses. The songs sung were "Car- 
olina", "Chinatown", ^nd "Drink 
to Me Only with Thine Eyes". 

Next week at the same time and 
Place,Beta Theta Pl„ Chi Psl, and 
the Oarfield Club will match 
voices. The winners will meet the 
Phi Oams in the semi-finals on 
May 23. ;: 



World Government ^^^ 
Topic Of Broadcast 

Prof, Landon G. Rockwell, 
Giles Kelly '49, and Richard 
Bildei- '49 will take part In a 
panel forum on 'World Govern- 
ment" over Albany's station 
WABF tomorrow at 8 p.m. The 
forum moderated by Prof. Ro- 
bert L. L. Scott, will discuss 
a speech made by Prof. Joseph 
E, Johnson on the same topic 
last week. 

Sponsored by the New York 
Foreign Policy Association, the 
programs broadcast a speech 
on some current topic by a fac- 
ulty member of a regional ed- 
ucational institution every oth- 
er week, and then bring two 
students and two other faculty 
members together the following 
week to discuss the topic. 



Tractor Hurls 
Caretaker, 70 



Quinn, Here 25 Years, 
Falls Under Machine 



Thomas C. Quinn. 70-year-old 
caretaker of Weston Field, was se- 
riously injured last Wednesday 
afternoon when he fell beneath a 
tractor which he had been using 
to pull a mower. 

Quinn is an employee of the 
Athletic As.Sociation. He has been 
working for the College for twen- 
ty-five years. 

Pelvis Smashed 

There were no actual witnesses 
to the accident. The cries of the 
injured man drew the attention 
of AROTC units which were drill- 
ing on the spot and then removed 
Ing on Weston Field at, the time 
He was given first aid on the spot 
and then removed to North Adams 
hospital. 

Examination revealed that both 
pelvic bones had been broken, 
but there was no indication of in- 
ternal injuries. 

See TRACTOR, Page 4 



Poe^s Writings 
On Exhibition 



Cliapin Dii^pluy Features 
Originals, Mysteries 



In commemoration of the 100th 
anniversary of the death of Ed- 
gar Allan Poe, Mary L. Richmond, 
custodian of Chapin Library has 
arranged an exhibit of his works 
to be displayed throughout May. 

Included in the exhibit is a rare 
first edition of "Al Aaraaf," one of 
the sixteen known copies, and the 
1845 edition of "The RaVen and 
Other Poems" often acclaimed as 
the most Important volume of 
poetry published in America up 
to that time. 

Wide Variety 

Poe's original type of short 
mystery story is represented by 
his first iJublished collections of 
the tales of mystery, horror, and 
crime, the forerunners of 20th 
century detective stories. Among 
these are "The Purloined Letter", 
"The Manuscript Pound in a Bot- 
tle," "Murders In the Rue Morgue" 
The Gold Bug," and others. 

A wide variety of material Is 
shown including an early poem in 
Poe's own handwriting, the first 
appearance of "The Bells" in Sar- 
tain's Union Magazine, his little 
known textbook on shells, a coll- 
ection of letters which were not 
published till 1923, Baudelaire's 
translation of Poe's works, and 
Eureka," whose strangely mo- 
dem ideas have caused many to 
See POE, Page 4 > 



Local AROTC 
Prepares For 
Federal Test 



Adkins To Get Award; 
Crack Squad To Drill 
In Inspection Parade 



.Potential Alr» Force Officers will 
parade before the public during 
the second annual Federal In- 
spection of the Williams Air 
ROTC Unit at Weston Field at 
1:15 p.m., next Wednesday. 

During the Inspection, Cadet Lt, 
Col. William Adkins, UI '49 will 
receive two awards, the Dlstin- 
quished Military Student Badge, 
and the Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution ROTC Award for outstand- 
ing achievement as an Air ROTC 
student. 

Review 

Featuring a parade and a re- 
view, the inspection is designed 
to determine the efficiency of in- 
struction and the achievement in 
military education of the local 
group. Clothlnr, arms, equip- 
ment, and the manner in which 
directives are executed will be 
examined. 

In the case of Inclement weath- 
er the parade and review will be 
held in LaSalle Gym, but because 
of the small size of the gym, the 
public will not be able to watch 
the ceremony. 

In last year's inspection a unit 
of 30 students received the high- 
est possible rating. Since then the 
size of the unit has increased ' to 
153 men. 

Besides the regular contingent 
of marching men, the ROTC will 
present « specially trained crack 
squad, consisting of fifteen picked 
men. They will execute the Silent 
Manual. 



Harvard Beats Varsity Nine 
7-4 Despite Owen's Triple, 
4)lsson's Fine Relief Hurling 



James Linen 
To Lecture 



Topic Of Talk Monday 
Is Advertising Career 



Under the direction of Voca- 
tional Guidance Director William 
O. Wyckofl, James A. Linen III, 
former Advertising Manager of 
"Life" and now Publisher of 
"Time", will speak on "A Career 
in Advertising" at 7:30 Monday 
night in St. Anthony Hall. 

"Jim Linen is one of Williams 
most successful graduates in this 
held. Since the majority of col- 
lege graduates have an itch to en- 
ter some phase of this business, 
and because the law of supply and 
demand has made it difficult, it 
is advisable- that every interest- 
ed student make a point of hear- 
ing Mr. Linen," Wyckoll advised. 
Recruiters End 

Drawing to a close the recruit- 
ing season for this .year, two re- 
presentatives of insurance and 
publishing are scheduled to visit 
the Placement Bureau this com- 
ing week to interview seniors for 
positions with their respective or- 
ganizations. 

Monday-Franklin P. Pierce, Gen- 
eral Agent for the Mutual Bene- 
fit Life Insurance Co , New York, 
oflers a formal training program 
for fuuure underwritcra, accounts, 
and security analysts. Underwrit- 
ers will receive salalV based upon 
requirements and their location 
See LINEN, Page 2 



Abrahms Declares Federal Control 
Ol Building Industry JNecessary 
To Stimulate Activity, Reduce Costs 



"We haven't made much pro- 
gress in the United States since 
the days of Neolithic Man," said 
Charles Abrahms speaking on 
"Housing in the United States 
Today," Tuesday night in Jesup 
Hail under the auspices of the 
Lecture Committee. 

"Home building has been the 
victim of the Industrial revolu- 
tion", continued Mr, Abrahms. 
He said that this may have result- 
ed from a feeling by entrepeneurs 
that the building industry could 
not be standardized or made to 
conform to beurocratic routines. 

The fact remains that a vast 
gap has been created between 
wliat a person earns and what it 
costs him to build a home. "This 
gap would not be as large if 1910 
building tools and methods were 
not still being used today." 

Economy House 

Private industry has produced 
the so-called "economy house" as 
a partial solution to the vast 
housing shortage which exists. 
"They feature two bed rooms at 
the most, a fact which pre-sup- 
poses that each family will have 
no more than two children of the 
same sex, something which God 
In his Infinite wisdom does n^J 
always decree. Neolithic man had 
better housing than this," 

"The -housing problem does not 
exist solely in the United States," 
affirmed Mr. Abrahms, "it is a 
world-wide problem." In the pre- 
sent war of ideologies, the world 
is keeping a keen eye out to see 
how our type of government can 
cope with housing deficiencies, a 
problem which Is of vital interest 
to everyone. A successful d^on- 
stration of what the United States 
can do through the use of im- 
proved techniques will bring more 
confidence In our way ot life. 



Mr. Abrahms pointed out that 
we have flitted from one housing 
emergency to another with a 
temporary solution being found 
in each case. Such a cycle will re- 
curr until a positive effort is made 
to solve it. he emphasized. Gov- 
ernment aids such as FHA and the 
Home Loan Bank System have 
not been effective enough. They 
have not followed the admirable 
policy of subsidizing infant indus- 
tries which the government has 
followed since the days of Alex- 
ander Hamilton, but rather, have 
been subsidies for a senile indus- 
try. 

The final resolution of the hous- 
ing problem con be found only 
through government taking over 
the entire industry, as it has done 
in road building and education. 
Mr. Abrahms commented that A- 
dam Smith had even' suggested 
Intercession by government in in- 
dustries which can not succeed by 
themselves. The replacement of 
this private sector of enterprise 
by the government will stimulate 
more private enterprise than 
it will supplant, he claimed. 

Not Permanent 

Public ownership need not be 
a permanent move. Inhabitants 
of government - built homes 
should be encouraged to buy or 
lease their dwellings. For those in 
the -lower income brackets, co- 
operatives could be established. 
Forty-one states are now engaged 
in such projects within their own 
government, pointed out Mr, Ab- 
rahms. Though they are doing a 
commendable Job, their programs 
should be accelerated. 

"My suggestions may not be 
the only .solution to the housing 
crisis," concluded Mr. Abrahms, 
"but we must Intercede in the 
rapid growth of slums in some 
manner." 




Dr. Elbert C. Cole, Williams Bio- 
logy professor, recently appointed o 
life trustee of Middlebury College. 



Cole Named 
By Middlebury 

Biology Prof. Awarded 
Lifetime Trusteeship 



Dr. Elbert C. Cole, Samuel Pes- 
senden Clarke Professor of Biol- 
ogy, has been appointed as a life 
trustee of Middlebury College, 
The announcement of Dr. Cole's 
appointment was made by Dr. 
Samuel S. Stratton. president of 
Middlebury. 

A graduate ot Middlebury. Dr. 
Cole received his masters degree 
at Trinity College and his doctor- 
ate at Harvard, where he held an 
Austin teaching fellowship. Hav- 
ing taught at Hartford High 
School for seven years as well as 
Trinity, he has served as a mem- 
ber of the Williams faculty since 
1924. Dr. Cole is chairman of the 
biology department. 



Crimson Ace 
Stops Williams 
Rally In 7th 

Olsson Whiffs Seven: 

Shcchy Or Sutton To 

Pace Trinity Today 



by Steve Blaschke 

Even though the Harvard Crim- 
son called the Williams game a 
"breather-.-type" contest, the Har- 
vards needed a valiant but hope- 
less starting effort by a sore-arm- 
ed Williams pitcher and a great 
relief performance by Ira Godln, 
the Crimson ace, to beat the Pur- 
ple 7-4 at Coldier's Field last 
Wednesday. 

The game's only mitigating cir- 
cumstances, as far as Williams 
fans were concerned, arrived In 
the form of Bob Olsson 's fine se- 
ven and a third inning relief stint. 
Olsson allowed only six hits and 
two earned runs while striking 
out seven. Furthermore George 
Owen made his appearance at the 
college where his father starred 
in baseball, hockey and as an AU- 
American football player known 
by blasting a two run triple and 
driving in three runs in the course 
of the ballgame. 

George Ditmar, the Williams 
stratcr, had a sore arm when he 
started the game and consequent- 
ly was hit hard until Olsson could 
get warmed up. By the time Ols- 
son had whiffed the eighth Har- 
vard batter in the first, the Crim- 
son had picked up a four run lead 
on five base hits. 

The Owen Blast 

Don LeSage got the only hit for 
the Ephmen in the first four Inn- 
ings while a long double by the 
Harvard third sacker had sent 
the fifth run home in the third. 
Williams came to life in the fifth, 
however, as Bush and Olsson, who 



Leader, Author 8ot on base three times in the 

Dr. Cole's two sons graduated | course of the afternoon, opened 
from Middlebury, and his daugh- , the inning by working Orlando 
ter is presently a sophomore. He ; Clay, the Crimson starter, for 
is a prominent leader in Middle- j walks. Clay then whiffed the next 
bury alumni affairs and the auth- ! two batters and then tried to blow 
or of several scientific articles and ^ fast ball past Owen. This man- 



two well known books. 

As a result of his efforts, the 
college's biology museum has been 
enriched. Dr. Cole led a group of 
Williams students spending the 
summer of 1936 on a Navajo In- 
See COLE. Page 4 



Jazz Session 
Plans Shaped 

Skold, Lawson To Play 
louring WCA Benefit 

Leonard Skold, former Purple 
Knights trumpeter now living in 
New York, will be featured in the 
coming WCA-sponsored Jazz con- 
cert, co-directors Assistant Pro- 
fessor Roy Lamson and Wally 
Oleson '49 have announced. The 
concert will take place in Jesup 
Hall on May 14, as part of the 
Houseparty Weekend celebration. 

It has also been announced that 
Bill Lawson, North Adams band- 
leader and saxophonist will be 
here for the concert. There are 
hopes that some Jazzmen from 
the Worcester area will also be 
able to participate in the hour and 
a half performance. 

In urging students to attend 
the concert, both Lamson and 
Oleson emphasized that all pro- 
ceeds are being turned over to the 
WCA and that the services of 
all musicians are being donated. 



euver failed and George pounded 
the horsehide high and far over 
the centerfielder's head. The two 
runners scored and it took a great 
relay-throw by the shortstop to 

: nip Owen at the plate. 

[ In the last of the fifth Hal 
Moffle, of gridiron fame, got one 
See HARVARD, Page 4 



WMS To Feature 
Three Sons Trio 



Special Record Shows 
For Party Weekend 



As a special feature this week, 
WMS, by special arrangement, 
will broadcast the Three Son* 
Trio, popular radio, night-club, 
and recording artists. At ten o'- 
clock Tuesday night they will air 
their regular program by spec- 
ial wire from Albany. 

On House-party Weekend, WMS 
has scheduled special late-night, 
disk-jockey shows, "Dawn Pa- 
trols", from 1-4 a.m. on Friday 
and Saturday nights. 

Both of this week's baseball 
games, the one with Dartmouth 
Wednesday, and the one with Un- 
ion on Saturday will be broad- 
cast by the college station. After 
the Union Game, at 5:15, will 
come the regular Saturday after- 
noon 'WMS feature, "Open House 

at the Inn", with the Purple 

Knights Quartet. 



i'te si ii';i* -iAiitti ;s4*ilfi.,^iii;.j!ii5i«Sftf»;ii^ 



.^'..V/.Ah.;'.-; -m^k ." ^J.j.^jii.' 




:^. ^^d:i ?':^^i^,i^ '• 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1949 



f tr« BiMf(|tti J^i£0t^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Williamstown, Massachusetts 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, )94-4, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college yeor. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, Telephone 72. 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone; 883-M or 113) 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 

Norman S. Wood '50 

Phjiip S. Collins '50 iPhone: 981 -M or 33) 

Lansing G, SCofield '50 ' , 

Walter P. Stern '50 
William R, Barney '49 



Editor 

Managing Editors 

News Editor 

Sports Editors 

Senior Associate 



Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Blaschke, K. F. X. Delcny, J. Gibson. 

Editorial Staff; 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R., Hastings. 

1952^ R. Duffield, G, Kinter, W, Macloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 

Widing. 
Staff Photographer John R. Kimberly 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 

Harry Frozier, III '51 

Douglos D. Gorfreld '50 

Barry Benepe .- ., 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 



Business Manager 

Advertising Manager 

Ass't Advertising Manager 

Asst. Advertising Manager 

.... Circu lotion Manager 
Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Gonyard, W. Leitzinger, 
W. Riegal, J. K, Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R Moir, H Voorhis, 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, W. Thomas, J, Henry. 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 7. 1949 



Number 15 



Attention Professors 

In the 'Clipboard" two issues back, we printed a short anec- 
dote about a Harvard student who wrote a C-plus hour exam in a 
Social Relations course in which he was not enrolled, had read 
no assinnmenls, and had attended no lectures. Such an accomp- 
lishment naturally provided our readers with a number of chuckles 
but it did little toward stimulatinu .serious reflection upon the 
weaknesses of our grading system. 

The true meaning of the incident was dismissed with a shrug 
because he was a Harvard student, or because it was a Social relations 
course, all of whicli are always gut anyway. If, this wasn't the case 
then the humor in the situation overcame the moral, or it was 
just ignored as a meaningless fluke. But we cannot overlook it in this 
manner. There are too many men who manage to do just about 
what this C-plus man did, only they do it at Williams and every 
term in every course. 

Shooting riie Bull 

Althougli these students are registered in their cour.ses and 
most of them sit through the lectures and page through the reading, 
there is little basic difference between the essays they write and 
the one written by the Harvard student. The grades they get are no 
indication of their understanding of the courses; they reflect only 
their ability to get away with shooting the bull on any topic what- 
.sover. 

Little can be done about this. So long as Williams keeps Us 
present testing policy — and we don't propose that it be changed, 
but only desire that its limitations be kept in view by those who 
mark the papers — the premium will be on ability to write quickly 
a coherent paper on any topic, rather than on understanding and 
a.ssimilating the material covered by a course. 

What little cliange is possible is an improvement in the atti- 
tude of teachers marking papers. The test grader has a thankle.ss 
task; he must read dozens of blue books written in an almost illegi- 
ble, hurried .scrawl, on tedious topics in careless English. Moreover, 
when he is finished with each one, he must somehow decide whether 
it merits .say a C-plus or a B-minus — that hairsplitting distinction 
which means .so much. Some profe.s.sors .solve the problem easily by 
always giving the lower grade just as a matter of principle. Because 
the job is such a vile one. there is a fordmidable temptation for pro- 
fessors to use something similar to the "stair technique" or to "peg" 
students on the basis of their first few grades. 

(^onscieulious Grading 

We cannot overemphasize the point that this temptation must be 
overcome. The power to make our system work better lies in the 
hands of each individual professor; and in him only. Reading exam- 
inations carefully and conscientiously trying to figure out exactly 
what grade a student deserves, cannot eliminate all the injustice 
inherent in our system; It might not even eliminate such farces as 
the recent Harvard case, but it will help to cut down on the more 
flagrant raw deals which students often receive. It will help to make 
undeistanding. and not ability to shoot the bull, the standard on 
which grades are based. The prevalent student attitude that marks 
are of minor importance testifies to the extent to which the opposite 
is now the case. 

That students are cynical as to the accuracy of grades, is no 
licen.se to haphazzard marking. Though they may not be taken ser- 
iously by the student for those who pass out scliolarships. graduate 
.school acceptances and jobs, the grade's the thing. 



Linen 



is nation-wide. The latter two are 
located in the Newark, N. J. area 
with $225 to start and $2150 after 
six months. 

Wednesday-Mr. H. E. Dralce. Jr. 
of the Reuben H. Donnelly fcorp.. 
Publishers of cla.ssified directories, 
etc.. will hold a meeting of all 
seniors, preferably 25 years and 
older, desiring an executive train- 
ing cour.se leading to a District 
Sales Managership. After filing 
application and taking vocational 
test.s Wednesday evening, candi- 
dates will have individual inter- 
views on Thur.sday, May 12. 
Thursday-During the personal in- 
terviews, Mr. Drake is prepared 
to offer openings in Directory 
Publications Divisions located in 
the Metropolitan N. Y. area. Such 
openings Include direct mail ad- 
vertising, etc. The two-year pro- 
gram Is composed of formal class 
training, direct selling and sales 



WMS 



commercial stations in the area 
saying that it definitely does not 
compete with them. Letters de- 
.scribing the Btuation have been 
sent to all alumni groups, and .ar- 
ticles have been submitted to me- 
tropolitan newspapers in the hope 
that intei'ested parties will give 
the station support. 

According to committee, mem- 
bers,, the help of faculty advi.sor 
Professor Roy Lamson, Jr., has 
been invaluable in the campaign. 

staff orientation. $65 weekly to 
start. 

Monday, May 16, J. E. Hitch- 
cock, Manager of the New Eng- 
land Service Office for the North 
America Companies, Philadelphia, 
desires June graduates to enter 
his companies training program 
for fieldmen and underwriters. 
Economics majors are preferred 
for location in the U. S. and a- 
broad. 



Hitting The Flicks 



MOTHER IS A FRESHMAN (Sun-Mon) Loretta is certainly getting 
a big play lately, but this one is a slight switch of role for her. The 
plot assumes that mother at a questionable 35 is Just as attractive as 
her daughter at 17. However, a small oversight makes Loretta so much 
more so that some unintentional comedy comes through where the 
planned stuff falls flat. Van Johnson as a professor of Shakesperian 
sonnets has no trouble flndlng the right things to say to her, but 
Williams faculty look out; his domicile will make your eyes pop. The 
picture succeeds in being light and semi-comic, but it is only mildly 
entertaining. 

PRIVATE MFE OF HENRY VIII (Tuesl Who needs no introduction 
to anyone. Charles Laughton has the juicy part and carries away all 
the honors as u.sual. Which of his wives Joan Bennett plays was never 
made quite clear to me. but if you like your pictures well done, and 
well-scripted, this revival is nothing to miss. Laughton is still the 
best character actor in the business. 

UNDER THE RED ROBE (Wed) Another great actor, Raymond Mas- 
sey, is starred in this historical romance. The set is the very popular 
French nth century countryside the girl, the beautious Annabella, 
the hero, Conrad Veidt, who is familiar as a villian, this time being 
superceded by Mr. Massey, who has the cardinal role of the treacher- 
ous Richelieu. Not bad. 

RAZZIA iThursi A German fllm with English subtitles, it follows 
the general pattern of the crime thriller only with the very popular 
foreign commodity of good acting and much realism. The black 
market is the background for the nefarious activities, and it comes 
replete with a girl who seems to be in no way inferior to Hildegard 
Knef. who we got a look at several weeks ago 

ALIAS NICK REAL iPi'i-Sat) Nick, who is played well by Ray Mil- 
land, is really the Devil, which provides .some pretty taught scenes 
when said adver.sary of mankind runs up against a man who Is in- 
herently good but can be talked into things. This man is Thomas 
Mitchell, an over-ambitious politician, who succeeds in becoming 
Governor when ably aided by MiUand. However, at the crucial mom- 
ent, the good in the man comes out and the Devil is forced to give 
it up for a bad job. Both the actors give excellent performances and do 
well by a script that has a number of very good lines in it. In fact, 
even if the happy ending is so well liandled that you won't leave 
the theatre thirsting for a Uttle old-time gory vengeance. 



Open Letter 



To the Editor of The Williams Record; 

I am writing this as an explanation of the forthcoming Spring 
Houseparty dance, about which there seems to be some confusion. 
The original plan of the Junior Cla,ss Committee was to hold an 
outdoor dance, which .seemed like a good idea indeed. However, two 
problems were present: flrst, getting a place to hold it and .second 
getting a big enough floor. The only practical place to have it was 
behind the AMT because the Lab campus was . not available. 
This was approved by the college. The problem of the floor in- 
volved the risk of rain, since no floor could be laid the day of the 
dance, but would have to have been laid on Thursday, An original 
price of $360.00 for a 100 by 60 floor was submitted by a company in 
Albany, but they shortly thereafter hiked their price to $650.00 and 
insisted on laying it Thursday. The risk involved as to weather 
would have involved a lo.ss of that $650.00. The company decided 
that problem for us by cancelling the order for the surface in New 
■Vork. stating that someone else was only too willing to take the 
chance and that the surface had gone to them. We then tried Bos- 
ton and New York and even .sent a feeler out to the Rutland Pair 
grounds and the net result was an offer to do the job for $80000. 
This would have put us over 'ouV budget and I don't think anyone 
in his right mind would have been willing to chance good weather 
for that price, since as soon as the floor was laid we would have been 
obligated to pay the contracted price. 

I. personally, am very .sorry that things worked out this way. 
but still feel that the purpose of having a dance spon.sored by a class 
and keeping costs down to a minimum over a very expensive week- 
end are still important. The dance is to be held in the Gym and the 
whole college is invited since the whole college is paying for it. It 
is a formal dance; I hope that everyone will go along with us on 
that. It would show a very poor attitude if a number of students 
insisted on being informal. 

This should answer most of the questions in regard to the 
dance. If anyone is still confused I'll Se glad to straighten them out. 
John C. Griggs 
Pies. Cla,ss of 1950 




Bipilmeil Irou Mir IM9 Imu< oI ESQUIRE 

• "Okay. Cut 'er hard" 



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Eph Polo Team Drops Close 
Match To Yale Jayvees, 97 



Yale's J- V, polo team snatched a 9-7 victory tiom a lallyiny 

Hums trio at PittsHeld Sunday, May 1. 

rlie Eph equestrians with John Aldeborgh playing at number 

Bill Hudson playing at number and Vic Heerman at unmber 

■c, were on the small end of a lop-sided 9-3 score aoiny into the 

:; chukker. but by the end of the sixth and last period they had 

sed four more goals whlle^ , 

;„(. a surprised Yale team moum^ ,,,o^ l^j^^ pj^^j.^^,^ j^.^j^^^ 
't'ss- I and Polo Club were a little tem- 

permenlal throughout the game, 
but none vied seriously for honors 
with the referee's pony. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1949 



ulson was high man for the 

ic riders, driving three goals 

,, Aldeborgh and Heerman 

,(i the remaining four tallies 

y between them. Eric Show^ 
playing his first game, sub- 

,'d for Aldeborgh during one 

i. 

mgs got off to a good start 
' Usfield when the referee's 
1 favored the audience with 



man rodeo 
duration. 



of 
All 



Any polo enthusiasts will be 
able to see the Williams trio per- 
form against Harvard on Sunday 
of Houseparty weekend. May 15, 
at Pittsflcld. The club plays the 
indoor-outdoor type of game, us- 
ing a ball similar to a Softball on 
a field that measures 125 yards by 
65 yards. The periods, or chuk- 



neaily an kers, of which there 



Williams flve minutes in length. 



urc SIX. are 




MEN! 






Order your Flowers tor Junior 
Formal now 

Delivery Guaranteed 
39 Main St. Tel. 143-W & 142 

Quadland's Flowers 

NORTH ADAMS 



Stickers Meet 
Tech Today 
On Cole Field 



Seek Third Loop Win 
Against Mediocre 
Mrr Lacrossenien 



Determined to bounce back in- 
to the win column after last Sat- 
urday's defeat at the hands of a 
strong Yale team. Coach Harvey 
Potter's lacrossemen meet a me- 
diocre MIT team on Cole Field 
this afternoon at 2 p.m. 

The Engineers' record to date 
is not particularly startling, but 
scores do not always tell the real 
story. MIT dropped its opener to 
Springfield 12-7; the Ephmen 
trounced Springfield a week later 
8-1. The Indians of Dartmouth 
drubbed MIT 26-0, but the Engin- 
eers hit the victory trail last Sat- 
urday with a 6-4 win over Adelphi. 
La.st year the Purple had little 
trouble with the visitors, beating 
them 11-9 before a hou.separty 
crowd, running up a 5-0 score in 
llie first quarter. 

Purple Patter 

Williams will be out for its 
ihnd win in the New England 
See STICKERS, Page 4 



Golfers Face 
Tough Hurdle 

Middlebury Ready For 
laconic Clash Today 



An Amazing Offer by 



Rolling along on the crest of 
three shutout victories in three 
starts, the Williams golf squad 
encounters its first real opposition 
of the young season when it meets 
a polished Middlebury team on 
the Taconic course this afternoon. 
The match begins at 2 pm. 

The visiting Panthers should 
prove an excellent tune-up for 
the New England IntercoUegiates 
which last for three days start- 
ing next Friday, Five lettermen 
are back from a team which lost 
only to the Ephmen last spring. 
Then after that SJ-i-SJz trimming, 
the Vermonters came back strong 
later in the season to tie Williams 
I by a ili-VJi count. In the New 
Englands the Middies went one 
step further and edged the Pur- 
ple out of fourth place. 

So far this spring Middlebury 
has faced teams from RPI and 
Dartmouth, whipping the former 
9-0, with the results of the Big 
Green match being unknown so 
far. Back with the Vermont cham- 
pions of a year J&q, are Captain 
Bob Boucher, who reached the 
quarter-finals of the New England 
amateurs in 1948, Rollie Boucher, 
who started the season at num- 
ber one, conqueror- of Bucky Mar- 
chese by a hard-fought two and 
one margm last spring and Ray 



AVERAGES 


UP 


TO AND INCLUDING 


HARVARD GAME 




Games 


AB 


H 


AVE 


RBI 


Doubles Triples Homeruns 


Cool 




3 


7 


3 


.428 






1 1 


Dltmar 




3 


6 


2 


.333 








Ollsson 




2 


3 


1 


.333 








Fisher 




4 


12 


3 


266 


•3 




2 1 


DeLlsse 


■ 


5 


19 


5 


.263 


1 




1 


Sheehy 




2 


4 


1 


.250 


2 




j 


Zeller 




5 


17 


4 


.235 


3 




1 


Owen 




5 


18 


4 


.222 


4 




1 1 


LeSage 




4 


15 


3 


.200 








Sutton 




2 


5 


1 


.200 


1 






Bush 




3 


6 


1 


.166 






1 


Mason, 


Ralph 


5 


13 


2 


.153 








Mason, 


Ray 


.4 


8 


1 


.125 


1 






Healy 




5 


12 


1 


.083 


1 




1 


Lynch 




5 


13 


1 


.077 








Waugh 




4 


13 





.000 



























Nihan, medalist in the NE cham- 
pionships two seasons ago. 

Able support for the lower slots 
Is provided by Don Bates, who 
holds the Vermont state title at 
pi-esent and by Jimmy Marchese, 
brother of Bucky and a fine player 
in his own right. The sixth posi- 
tion will be filled by anyone of a 
host of good newcomers. 

Purple Line-Up Uncertain 

The exact team that will repre- 
.sent Williams this afternoon is 
not definite at this writing. A 
number of capable players could 
bi'eak into the line-up by virtue of 
their pre-match form. Berry 
Smith and Ted Quinlan are two 
linksmen who keep the team for 
the last match. Buck Marchese, 
Jerry Cole. Chuck White. Dick 
Heuer, Bill Rodie and Jake Wit- 
ney on their toes, | 



IiitrainuralSoftball 
Gets Under Way 

Early Standings Show 
Closely Fought Race 



ANNOLNCING THE FIHST ISSl E 



*7/te GoUexfe ^u^edi 

Featuring W ILLI AMS and 33 otlier 
Northeastern Colleges and Universities 
\*v*' on Sale at your nearest Newsstand 




At the end of last week the in- 
tramural Softball sea.son was well 
under way, with close race an- 
ticipated in each of the two lea- 
gues on the basis of the results so 
far. In ihe Monday- Wednesday 
League the Zetes.Theta Delt and 
Phi Gam look strong, with the 
Saints and the Garfield Club 
close behind. The Phi Delts are 
ofl to a flying start in the struggle 
for supremacy in the Tuesday- 
Thursday League, with the Bete's 
and Psi U's threatening. The 
i league standings as of Wednes- 
day, May 4: 

Mon. - Wed. League 
Zeta Psi 3-1 

Theta Delt 3-1 

Phi Gam 3-1 

Garfield Club 2-2 

St Anthony 2-2 

Kappa Alpha 1-2 

Alpha Delt 1-4 

Delta Upsilon 0-3 

Tues. - Thurs. League 
Phi Delt 4-0 

Beta Theta Pi 3-0 

Psi Upsilon 3-1 

DKE 2-2 

Chi Psi 1-4 

Delta Phi 0-2 

Phi Sig 0-2 

Sigma Phi 0-2 



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Ttiree-Year Day Course 
Four-Year Evening Course 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Member Assn. of Amer. Low Schools 
Motricuionts must be College grad- 
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College record. 
CLASSES BEGIN SEPT. 26th, 1949 

For further information address 
Registrar, Fordhom University 

School of Low 
302 Broadwoy, New York 7, N. Y. 



If safety were spectacular, it would be 
front-page news that Kill Jone.s and other 
telephone men drive .Vi.llOO vehicle.s more 
than a million miles a day— with one of 
the nation's lowest aeclflent rates. 

Today, for example, Bill will drive a lot 
of miles. He'll Ruide his fainiliar green 
telephone truck through the heavy traffic 
of shopping centers, he'll go along iiuiet 
streets where children play, he'll travel 
lanes and highways at the edge of town. 
And every mile, every turn, will always 



be driven steadily and carefully. 

You see. Hill and the telephone company 
consider good driving as much a imrt of 
his job as installing a telei)hone. The truck 
which Bill drives is checked and .serviced 
regularly, so it's always safety -perfect. ■ 
And Bill gets a lot of training in safety 
—training that covers all phases of his 
work. 

Bill has helped put together one of the 
best safety records in the country. It's a 
record we're proud of — and .so is Hill, 




JUMHAER W49 



UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CO. 

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THE WILLIAMS RECORD, SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1949 



' Stickers • ■ • 

League compe;tlUon, aa against 
one loss, and Its fifth triumph to 
nine starts, Includjjig the SprUig 
(trip. The Williams lineup will be 
' the same, as In past ^ames. The 
strong defense of Wasp Simpson, 
Bob Donoho, and Mark Reynolds 
' will team up with the first mld- 
fleld of Buz Brumbaugh, Phil Van 
Dusen and Captain Austy Talia- 
ferro and the experler^ced attack 
of Pat Qraney, Ed Maynard, and 
Oordy McWUUams. Agile Mickey 
O'Connell wiU_ tend the nets. 

Subs likely to se action are de- 
fensemen Lumber Young, Charlie 
Arnold, and Skip Dunlap, mid- 
fielders Coke Scofleld, Ronnie 



Take Your 
B'town Date To 

The New Bowlaway 

Bowling Every Day 

Except Sunday From 

3 PM until Midnite 

Union St. Bennington 



Lund, Benepe Gain 

Record Board Spots 

The Business Board of the 
RECORD announces the fol- 
lowing new appointments: Jack 
Lund '61 is to be Circulation 
Manager. Barry Benepe '60 
moves up to a Board position 
as an Assistant Advertising 
Manager, and Jim Henry '52 is 
now a member of the business 
staff. 



Chute, Bobby Day, Neut Schluter, 
Dave Pynchon, Gordy Clark, and 
Mitch Fish, attackmen Fraser 
Mofiat, Cy Mayshark. Dave Van 
Alstyne, and Norm Wood. 



Tractor 



Best guesses as to the cause of 
the accident seem to indicate that 
Quinn was holding the tractor out 
of gear with his foot while he 
leaned over to make ah adjust- 
ment on the hydraulic machinery 
for lowering the gang mowers. He 
lost his balance and slipped ofi 
the seat. The clutch immediately 
engaged and the tractor rolled 
over his body before he could es- 
cape. 



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Ji cUtr m^'cMn at-u/ S^, Mase sfiotfs always 

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The Wrigfu & Dillon and Iti 
twin the Spalding TennU Ball 
lead the field tn official adop. 
lioni for Major Ibnrnamenta, 
tncluding the U.S. Davla Cup 
and National Championitalpt. 



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stTS rug PAce 



IN SPOHTS 




Harvard • • - 

of those runs back by virtue of a 
linedrive tripple but coach "Stuf- 
fy" Mclnnls still wanted more se- 
curity and so when the first two 
Purple batters walked to open the 
seventh, he pulled Oodln out of 
the bullpen. Oodin, the possessor 
of a very fast ball as well as a 
great curve, proceeded to load the 
sacks by walking; LeSage. He then 
hit Mlerzejewski^and gave Owen 
a free ticket, giving the Ephmen 
two more runs and a fair chance 
to upset the Harvard Crimson's 
crystal-ball gazer. Oodin settled 
down at this stage, however and 
struck out the side. In fact, he 
whiffed eight of the fifteen bat- 
ters he faced. 

Too Much Godln 

The Purple threatened again in 
the eighth when singles by LeSage 
and Olsson and a walk to Mierze- 
jewski loaded the bases with two 
outs and Owen at bat. Again Oo- 
din reared back and settled the 
problem via the strikeout route. 
A single, a passed ball, a sacri- 
fice and an error gave the Crim- 
son their seventh run in theeighth 
before LeSage could turn a sensa- 
tional leaping catch Into a fast 
inning-ending doubieplay. 

This afternoon the Coombs- 
men face a good hit - no pitch 
Trinity nine at Weston field. Har- 
ry Sheehy will start if he has re- 
covered from the fiu. It not, Bob 
Olsson, who earned a start In the 
Harvard game, or Harry Sutton, 
credited with the only Purple vic- 
tory, will be the starting hurler. 



WMS Schedule 



Poe 



maintain that Poe anticipated 
20th century science. In addition, 
several portraits are exhibited 
which show "the most singularly 
gifted and most helplessly tragic 
figure In American literature." 



Monday thru Friday 

6:00-6:15 Afternoon Roundup 

Monday 

7:30 Concert Hall 'V 

8:00 News 

9:16 Band of the Night 
9:30' Songs by Schaufiler 
9:46 McCombe at the Piano 
10:00 Interfraternity Sing 
10:30 Campus Hit Parade 
11:00-12:00 Music till midnight 

Tuesday 
7:30 Concert Hall 
9:00 News and Sports 
9:15 Band of the Night 
9:30 Kellogg & Steinbrenner 
9:45 Evans & Park 
10:00 SPECIAL FEATURE 
10:30 Dramatic Workshop 
11:00-12:00 Music till midnight 

Wednesday 

3:55 Baseball Oame 

Dartmouth vs Williams 



Cole ■ • - 



dlan Reservation In northern Ar- 
izona and another to the Panama 
Canal Zone In 1937. Both expedi- 
tions collected specimens and 
photographic records many of 
which appear in the biology la- 
boratory. 



RELIABLE SERVICE 

Join our lilt of Rofular 
Willlomi Cuitomars at . . 

KRONICK'S 
Esso Station 

Opposite Howard Johnson's 



7:30 Concert Hall 

9:00 News 

9:15 Band of the Night 

9:30 Show Time 
10:00 Gilbert and SihUvon 
10:30 Ferguson Jazz Show 
11:00-1200 650 Club 
Thunday 

7:30 Faculty T&lks 

7:45 Concert Hall 

9:00 News > 

9:15 Band of the Night 

9:30 Plumb's "Bop Shop" 
10:00 Vemey Musical Quiz 
10:30 Coffee Time at Mike's 
11:00-12:00 Music tlU midnight 

7:30 Concert Hall 

9:00 News 

9:15 Band of the Night 
9:30 Old Chuck Wagon 
10:00 Mostly for Dreaming 
11:00-12:00 Music tlU midnight 
1:00-4:00 Houseparty Special 
Saturday 

2:65 Baseball Oame 

Union vs Williams 

6:15 Open House at the Inn 
1:00-4:00 Houseparty Special 



ROSASCO'S TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

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SATURDAY 

'The Morx Brothers 

A NIGHT 
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Feoture ot 6:45 - 8:50 



SUNDAY — MONDAY 

Loretto Young Van Jol, on 

MOTHER IS A FRESHMAN 

Sunday 2:00, 3:4S 

5:J0, 7:15, 9:00 
Monday 6:55, 8:40 

TUESDAY 

Charles Laughton Robert D lot 
Merle Oberon 

PRIVATE LIFE OF 
HENRY VIII 



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Volume LXI I Ij^Number 16 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



*//T*y: 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 1), 1949 



Price 1 cents * 



Eph Trackmen CaptWe Little Three 



Ten Topples Tech, 16-4 



{ raney, Maynard Lead Home 
j^iickmen To Fifth/ Triumph 

y^^ -^ \ 

I'aking control of the game at^e opening whistle, the Williams 
l.uiosse team humbled MIT, 16-4. mst Saturday afternoon on Cole 

V !d'. The game was a repeat performance of last year's lopsided 

VI oiy over the Techmen. 

The Purple stickmen showed their superiority early as they 

:i;i)cd to a 7-0 first quarter lead. The margin was widened to 11-0 

a: he half time intermission. Five more goals were added in the 

t . ci period to close the Eph scor-^ . 

i:; The Engineers broke Into the 

. mg column In the fourth fj^^gl^jj^^j^ ]\lj^ 

Triumphs^ 8-0 

Pelhutn Wins As Cults 
Down Pittsfield Ti-am 



(; iter while the home forces j 
wi-.n held scoreless as Coach Har- 
r. Potter scrambled his lineup 
1,., liaving the close defen.se play 
nudfield and the goalie play att- 
ack. 

Grsney Leads Scoring 
Hat Qraney led In scoring for 
iiip game with four goals and two 
a.s.slsts. Ed Maynard followed him 
with three goals and one assist. 
Bobby Day, Cy Maysharji, and 
Oordy Clarke each notched two 



Dale Burnett's freshman ball 
team downed St. Joseph High 
School of Pittsfield 8-0 on Cole 
Field Saturday afternoon in an 
unscheduled encounter. Though 
oals. Aycrlgg,tallled twicefor the hampered by injuries and no hits 

till the sixth inning, the Eph cubs 



vi.sitors and Hucke and Madden 
added one apiece. Two of the visi- 
tois goals were scored while Wil- 
liams had a man in the iJenalty 
l)ox, four of the Purple goals were 
ualned by MIT penalties. 

This ; was the fifth victory in 
nine starts for the Pottermen, i 

with their only New England de- pg^^ callahan covered first base 
uut coming at the handa of Yale. ^„£, ,,,^5 relieved by Ted Camield 
Oraney leads the team in scoring ^ ^^^^ ^^g^^^^ j,^ U^^rvey filled in 
with eighteen points on eight goals \ ^j ^^^^^^ ^^^^ Bil, callaghan re- 
and ten assists. Maynard Is second u^ygj ^Im in the fifth. Callaghan, 
with seventeen points on thirteen regular third sacker, was not ex- 
and four assists. Oordy McWlU- pelted to see action at all because 

of a torn ligament in his tossing 



came through with a display of 
power at the plate and consistan- 
tly sound pitching and field play 
to overwhelm their adversaries. 
The Purple's starting line-up 
had Jim Manning on the mound 
' and Tom Adkins behind the plate. 



Strpng Trinity 
Nine Trounces 
Purple, 11-2 

Visitors Jump On Trio 

Of Williams' Hurlers 

For Dozen Bingles 



iams has eleven goals and four 
as-sists. Saturday's scoring: 
Ctoals: Qraney 4, Maynard 3, 



arm. Kev White took over at third 
until the eighth when Jim Harvey 



Diiy 2, Mayshark 2, Clarke 2, Mc- i re-entered the game. Paul Cramer 
Williams Brumbaugh. Talieferro. , j-mofj gates, and Jack Morrison 
As.sists: Qraney 2, Scofleld 2, May- 1 pj^yed the entire game at short 



nil id, Mc Williams, Taliaferro 
C'lute.Van Dusen, Fresnch, Moody 



J'rusleesAnnounce 
Faculty Revisions 

'ox, Cremcans Resign; 
18 Other Shifts Made 



The Trustees of Williams Col- 
ege accepted the resignation of 
Bertrand Pox, William Bro'ugh 
Professor of Economics, effective 
July 1, at their meeting on May 8. 
In addition, sixteen appointments, 
four reappointments, and one pro- 
motion were made, another re- 
signation was accepted, and one 
leave of absence was granted. 

Professor Pox has accepted a 
university teaching position. At 
the same meeting, two new ap- 
pointments were made to the Ec- 
onomics Department as assistant 
professors. A graduate of Colora- 
do University summa cum laude 
In 1943, Paul J. Clark did his gra- 
duate work at Harvard Univer- 
sity, vhere he has been a member 
of the economics staff. 

William H. Martin received his 
A.B. from Princeton In 1942 and 
saw service In World War n for 
four years. He comes to Williams 
from Harvard, where he has been 
« Teaching Petlowln Accounthir 
and Statistics. 

Cremeans Resicns 

The resignation of (Jharles Cre- 
means, assistant professor of his- 
tory was also accepted. Professor 
Cremeans has been appointed as- 
sociate professor of history at O- 
berlln College, 

In his place, the trustees ap- 
pointed Robert O. U Wftlte as 
assistant professor? He Is a gra- 
duate of Macalaster College, 
where he taught for one year. 
Prom 1942-44, he served In the 
See TRUSTEES, Page 2 



stop and , in the right and , left 
fields respectively. George Bart- 
lett and Chuck Harris filled in 
for Injured regular, John Kulsar, 
m left field. 
St. Joseph's pitcher had allowed 
See FRESHMEN, Page 2 



Trinity picked up two runs in 
the first inning and simply never 
stopped scoring as they pounded 
a trio of Williams pitchers for 
twelve hits and an 11-2 victory on 
Weston Field last Saturday. Tom 
Healy, who was a last minute re- 
placement for shortstop Don Le- 
Sage got a single, a double and a 
triple in a losing cause. 

The hiUtoppers had a 2-0 lead 
by the time the Purple got their 
first chance to bat and Healy pro- 
mptly whacked a triple to center 
but died on third as his team- 
mates failed to hit with men on 
base. This characteristic^ has hurt 
the ballclub in virtually every 
game this year. Trinity picked up 
anothei- run in the third but Wil- 
liams was still in the ballgame 
when DeLisser walked to open the 
fourth. o 

Owen Triples 

At this point Creorge Owen 
stopiMd the show with tremendous 
blast to right field. By the time 
the smoke had cleared, DiLisser 
had scored and Owen was perched 
on third with nobody out. It was 
estimated that the Owen blast 
carted 475 feet in the air. Again, 
however, the Trinity pitcher kil- 
led the rally with three strike- 
outs. 

See NINE, Page 2 



Hou8eparty\To Feature 
Sports, Daii^e, Picnic 

Weekend festivities will be- 
gin Friday evening with the 
college dance In La^alle Oym 
from 9-2. On Satuljday, Cole 
Field win be the sceiie of class 
beer picnics from 12-2* 

Athletic events Saturday In- 
clude: Varsity baseball with 
Union, 3 p.m. Weston Field; 
Freshman baseball with Wes- 
leyan, 2 p.m. Cole Field; Ten- 
nis, New England Champion- 
ships, Sage Hall Courts, Fresh- 
man against Harvard, Lower 
courts, 2:30; and Freshman la- 
crosse with Union, 2:30, Cole 
Field. 

At 8 p.m. a jazz concert will 
be presented in Jesup Hall. So- 
cial unit dances will be held 
later in the evening. 



Outers Test 
"Woods" Skill 



Take 3rd In Dartmouth 
Woodsman's Weekend 



Planskymen Post Eight Firsts 
To Beat Amherst, ^^V^-^^V^ 

• Friday afternoon on rain-soaked Pratt Field, the WilUams track 
team captured Its first Little Three title since 1941, trouncing Am- 
herst 77)2'- 51%. The Planskymen had little trouble handing Amherst 
its third worst shellacking in the history of track rivalry between 
the two colleges. 



Golfers Crush 
Panthers, 7-2 



Middlebury Fourth 
Victim Of Season 



Six Williams Outing Club out- 
door enthusiasts captured third 
place in Dartmouth's annual 
Woodsman's Weekend last Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Participating in thirteen events 
in the two days, the sextet match- 
ed their Woodsman's skills a- 
gainst men from six other col- 
leges. The contests Included such 
events as tree felling, wood chop- 
ping and sawing. Are building, 
pulp-wood throwing, canoe rac- 
ing, and fly and bait casting. 

Top man for the Williams 

woodsmen was James Dorland '50. 

whose sixty foot cast took honors 

in the fly casting event. He, to- 

See woe. Page 2 



Softball Races 
Still Undecided 



This Week's Wins May 
Cause Teams To Tie 



Chances for extended seasons 
were possible in both intramural 
Softball leagues as teams swung 
into their last regularly scheduled 
games on Monday and Tuesday. 
Standing, including games of 
Wednesday, May 4, show that in 
the Monday- Wednesday League, 
the Theta Delts and Saints are 
strongest, with the Zetes, Phi 
Oams, and Kaps hoping for their 
downfall, while the Phi Delts, Psl 
U's, and Betes are leading the 
Tuesday-Thursday League, with 
the Dekes and Phi Sigs pressing 
from behind. The Standings: 
Monday Wednesday 







w. 


L. 


Pet. 


1 


Theta Delt 


4 


1 


800 


2 


.qaint-"! 


1... 


1 


.800 


3 


Zeta Psl 


4 


2 


.667 


4 


Phi Qam 


3 


2 


.600 


5 


Kappa Alpha 


3 


2 


.600 


6 


Garfield 


2 


3 


.400 


7 


Alpha Delt 


1 


5 


.1*17 


8 


Delta Upsilon 





5 


.000 




Tuesday 


Thursday 




1 


Phi Delt 


5 


1 


.833 


2 


Psl U 


5 


1 


.833 


3 


Betes 


4 


1 


.800 


4 


Dekes 


3 


2 


.600 


S 


Phi Slg 


3 


2 


.600 


6 


Chi Psl 


: 1 


4 


.200 


7 


Sigma Phi 


1 


5 


.167 


8 


DPhl 





6 


.000 



Frosh Ciiid^rmen Victorious; 
Kent Conquers Tennis Team 



Saturday's match with a high- 
ly-touted Middlebury golf squad 
pl;oved that it will take a mighty 
fine team to stop Dick Baxter's 
varsity golfers this spring. The 
Purple combine took a solid 7-2 
decision from the visiting Pan- 
thers for their fourth straight win 

Although the Ephs were not in 
their best playing form, led by Bill 
Rodie's ■ 77 and Captain Jerry 
Cole's 79, they were impressive 
enough in victory. Bucky Mar- 
chese, in the number one spot, 
tied Bob Boucher of Middlebury 
to halve a point while Cole down- 
ed Bates one up. Marchese and 
Cole took their best ball by two 
and one. 

Jim Marchese On Top 

Chuck White and Rodie won 
best ball in the second foursome 
four up and three to play. White 
won his singles from Rollie Bou- 
cher by the same tallie as Rodie 
edged Nihan of the visitors with 
a long putt on the 17th, two and 
one. 

Dick Heuer lost the first Wil- 
liams singles of the season when 
Jim Marchese, brother of Bucky. 
closed fast on the second nine to 
snare a one up triumph. A five 
and three margin of victory, larg- 
est of the match was provided by 
Kim Whitney of the Purple over 
'the Middle's Patterson. The Pan- 
thers gained the final halt point 
by virtue of a best ball tie in this 
third foursome. 



Cub Thinclads VictorB 
Over RPI, 67 i^.48>i 



The Williams freshman track 
team made their first home ap- 
pearance a most successful one 
last Saturday afternoon as they 
trounced the visiting frosh from 
RPI 67M to 48^. It was the second 
victory for the frosh cindermen 
In as many meets, and only the 
Little Three Championships on 
May 17 stands between them and 
an undefeated season. 

The frosh were led by Jack 
Brody, who garnered 23 points 
with wins in both dashes, the 
broad jump, the discus, and a 
second in the shot put. His time 
of 9.9 in the 100 yd. dash was a 
very fine showing despite a strong 
tallwlnd. Jim Haskell shared the 
spotlight with his fast 2:02.8 half 
mile, and Pete Smith came from 
behind to win the quarter in 63.4. 

Final Meet'May 17 

The absence of star hurdler 
George Stelnbrenner, who was 
out with a leg Injury, did not seem 
to hinder the frosh hurdle races 
as Dick Walters oapfurea tjse 
highs In 16.9, and Gus Campbell 
won the lows In 28.3. George 
Rhelnbrecht came through In the 
high jump with a 6'9" showing; 
and Chuck Hamilton, Rick Jef- 
frey, and Dick Walters tied for 
first In the pole vault. 

Other point winners who aided 
the frojh cause were Doug Wilson 
in the mile, George MapAleenan 
m the shot. Bob Rlegel In the 440, 
and Chuck Salmon In the javelin. 

The final- meet of the season 
See CUBS, Page 2 



Yearling Netmen Lose; 
Norton, Boocock Win 



The freshman tennis team once 
again bowed to a superior prep 
school aggregation, as they took 
a 6-3 beating at the hands of 
Kent, Saturday afternoon on the 
Sage Hall courts. 

Hank Norton, Coach Chaffee's 
number one man, took his match 
with ease, and Brett Boocock, 
playing in the number fiv^ soU? 
playing in the number five slot 
losing a love set, to triumph over 
his opponent from Kent. The four 
other Eph singles players all lost, 
however, leaving it clearly up to 
the three doubles teams, all of 
whom had to win. If a Williams 
victory were to be recorded. Nor- 
ton and Pickard managed to down 
the number one Kent team, but 
both the Rich-Noble andBoocock- 
Oeorge combinations went down 
In defeat. The final score: Kent 
6 — Williams 3. The team will en- 
counter the Harvard freshmen 
Saturday afternoon on the home' 
courts. 
The Summary: 



Slngleis— Norton (W) defeated 
Jackson (K) 6-1, 6-0; Jones (K) 
defeated Plekard (W) 6-1, 5-7, 
6-4; Dewing (K) defeated Rich 
(W) 8-4, 7-5; Hlndle (K), defeat- 
ed George CW) 6-4, 6-Oifeoocock 
<W) defeated Brophy (K) 0-6, 
6-4, 6-1; Sheppard (K) defeated 
Stroh (W) 6-3, 8-6. 
Doubles — Norton and Pickard 
(W) defeated Jackson and At*- 
rowsmlth (K) 8-8,'''6-3; Jones and 
Boardman (K) defeated Rich and 
See IfEARLINOS, Page 2 



Cleanup Drive 
On Thursday 

Class Presidents Head 
Thorough Campaign 



In an effort to whip the campus 
Into condition for Houseparty 
weekend, the class presidents are 
organizing a college-wide cleanup 
campaign tomorrow before lunch. 
According to plans, the noon meal 
hour will be postponed until 12:45 
p.m. so that all undergraduates 
may participate in an intense," 
well-organized effort to improve 
the appearance of the grounds. 

The work Is to be distributed 
so that the Freshmen will be re- 
sponsible for their quad, the soph- 
omores for the lab campus, and 
the upperclassmen for the grounds 
about their respective Houses. The 
Garfield Club is to clean the Berk- 
shire Quad- 
Supervised by the class presi- 
dents, the plan calls for the piling 
of the collected trash in heaps at 
specified points, so thjit college 
pick-up trucks may easily remove 
the refuse later In the afternoon 



The meet was highlighted by 
clean-sweeps in the high hurdles, 
quarter mile, and mile run for 
the Purple thinclads. Distance 
speedster Kev Delany's twin vic- 
tories in the half and mile runs, 
and Ben Read's three timely wins 
in the high barriers, broad jump, 
and high jump were the indivi- 
dual highlights. 

Barney Wins With Ease 

Captain Bill Barney ran his 
usual fine race to capture the 440 
with ease in 51.5. Marty Detmer 
bested the field in the shot with 
a toss of 43'5", Pete Maxwell won 
the lows, and, along with Andy 
Bacharach, was a constant point- 
winner all afternoon. 

The Varsity will close its dual- 
meet season on May 17. when 
they meet a better-than-average 
Connecticut U. squad at Conn. 
The season finale will be the New 
England Championships at Bos- 
ton on May 21. 

The Purple thinclads have won 
three straight meets, having de- 
feated U- of Mass.. Wesleyan and 
Amherst, while losing only to 
R.P.I. This fine record could mean 
a good Eph showing at the New 
Englands this season. 
Summary 
120 yd. H.H. 1 Read (W> 2 Max- 
well (W> 3 Andrews iW) time: 
16.4 

100 yd. Dash 1 Neil (A) 2 Middle- 
ton (A) 3 Bacharach (W) Time: 
10.2 

Mile Run 1 Delany (W) 2 Hutton 
|(W) 3 Dorian (W) Time: 4:39 
440 yd. Dash 1 Barney (W) 2 Ba- 
jcharach iW) 3 Brooks <W) Time: 
51.5 

jTwo Mile Run 1 Bozarth (A) 2 
iKelton (W) 3 Tie Cook iW) Ess 
j (W) Time 10:17.2 
220 yd. L.H. 1 Maxwell (W) 2 Pier- 
]son (A) 3 Hamill (A) Time: 26.1 
•880 yd. Run 1 Delany (W) 2 

Smith, G. (W) 3 Jackson (A) 
Time: 1:58.7 

220 yd Dash 1 Neill (A) 2 Barney 
(W) 3 Bacharach (W) Time: 22.3 
Shot Put 1 Detmer IW) 2 Zebryk 
(W) 3 Mulroy (A) Dist. 43'5" 
Pole Vault 1 Hatch (A) 2 Gouin- 
lock (W) 3 Tie Pinkerton (W) 
Wells (A) Height: 12'0" 
Discus 1 Meier (A) 2 Edwards, T. 
(W) 3 Mulroy (A) Dist. 124'i;^" 
High Jump 1 Read (W) 2 Tie Wil- 
liams (A) Wells lA) Height: 5'11" 
Broad Jump 1 Read iW) 2 Pier- 
son (A) 3 Maxwell (W) Di'st. 20'8" 
See TRACKMEN, Page 2 



Why? ^ 



We put out._ only two pages 
this issue, but It was no holi- 
day for the RECORD staff. The 
time saved, and then some, 
were direly needed by both the 
istafT ahd our printer in order 
to get ready the special, extra- 
large, houseparty edition. 



Levin, Fischer Win 
Debating Prizes 

VanVechten Speaking 
To Be Held May 19 

Arnold Levin and David Fisch- 
er won first and second prizes of 
twenty dollars and ten dollars Fri- 
day night in the annual freshmen 
debating contest sponsored by the 
Board of Trustees. Levin spoke 
on "Federal Aid to Education, " 
while Fischer's topic was "Federal 
World Govemment.'' instructor " 
Myei- Rashlsh and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Richard O Rouse, Jr. judg7 
ed the six contestants. 

A similar upperclass contest 
will be held on May 19 at 
8:00 In 3 Griffin for the VanVech- 
ten prize of thirty doHars, esta- 
blished by A.V.W. VanVechten of 
the class of 1847. Any student who 
has participated In a varsity de- 
bajte during the year Is eligible to 
enter the contest with an eight 
I minute speech on any debate topic 
,he chooses. 




;■'/■ 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1949 




BilllgnlJU^irf;^ 



Trackmen 



lorth Adams, Massachusetis 



Willlanistown, Massachusetts 



Entered os second-class matter November 27, 1944, at the ppst office ot 
North Adhms, Mossochusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Miller, Lomb ond Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday ond Saturday duririg the college year. Subscription prlce'*$5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williomstown, Telephone 72. 



Javelin 1 Parsons (A) 2 Mulroy 
(A) 3 Plrle Dlst. 166'4" 
Hammer 1 Nevhoff (A) 2 Fergu- 
son (W) 3 Meier (A) Dlst 138'10" 



Letters To The Editor 



113) Editor 

Editors 



Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone; 883-M or 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 ^ M„„„„i„„ 

Normon S. Wood '50 Monaging 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 331 News Editor 

Lonsing^G. Scofield '50 , „,, c.,..,, 

.., ,^ ^ ci 'cn Sports editors 

Walter P. Stern 50 "^ 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associate 

Associate 'fditors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke, K. F. X. Delany, J. Gibson. 



Ediforiol StCiff 
1952- R 
Widing. \ 

Staff Photogroplier 



1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reiche, D. Ruder, R. Hostings. 
Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, H. Pickard, E. Schur, W. 



John R. Kimberly 



John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 „ . ,, 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 _. B"^'"«= Manager 

Harry Frozier, 111/51 .....TT..,..?-',." ::.::.; Advertising Manager 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 Ass't Advertising Manager 

Barry Benepe Asst. Advertising Manager 

John Lund Circulation Manager 

W. Robert Mill '51 Treasurer 

Business Stoff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. Ganyard, W. Ueitzinger, 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. Foss, L. Jacob, J. Lund, 
R. Moil, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickford, D. Evans, W. Hatch, 
S. Humes, C. Noson, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, W. Thomas, J. Henry. 



Volume' LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



Number 16 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Rood 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SARINS 

Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adams 






WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 

THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feoture^: 6:40 - 8:45 

\ 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Ray Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



Nine 



The HiUtoppers continued their 
assault by scoring seven times 
during the fifth, sixth and se- 
venth innings and piclcing up a fi- 
nal run In the eighth. A walk, a 
single by Ralph Mason and an- 
other single by Fritz Zeller pro- 
duced the second Williams tally 
in the sixth but otherwise the 
Purple offensive was pretty feeble 
as twelve men were left on base 
to go with the fourteen orphaned 
ballplayers of the Harvard game. 

This afternoon the Coombsmen 
meet a power-laden Dartmouth 
Nine on Weston field. The Indians 
who are leading the Ivy League, 
have lost only to BC this spring. 
Last year they defeated the Pur- 
ple and George Ditmar by a 7-5 
count. Ditmar, Harry Sheehy, or 
Bob Olsson are the possible start- 
ers in what promises to be the 
Ephmen's toughest ballgame 
the year. 



Yearlings - ■ • 

NObJe (W) 6-1, 4-8, 6-1; Dewing 
and Brophy (K) defeated Boo- 
cock and George (W) 6-1, 5-7, 

6-1. 

-^^- 

Freshmen . ^ 

no hits when he was replaced In 
the sixth frame. Pete Pelham who, 
with battery mate Jack Haas, had 
taken over the Eph mound chores 
in the fifth started the hitting bar- 
rage which netted eight runs. Jer- 
ry Olson relieved Pelham, the 
winning pitcher,, in the eighth 
Inning. 



Trustees 



of 



Williams line-up 








ab 


r 


Bush, 2b 


4 





Mierzejewski 








Healy, ss 


5 





DeLisser, 3b 


4 


1 


Owen, rf 


4 


1 


Fisher, If 


.3 





Tone 


1 





Lynch 


1 





Mason, R., cf 


4 





Cool, lb 


3 





Mason, Ray 


1 





Zeller, c 


3 





Manning 








Sutton, p 


1 





Lanes, p 


1 





Ditmar 


1 





Ray, p 


1 






U S Army and has been a Teach- 
ing Fellow in history at Harvard 
and a member of the history staff. 

One promotion to the faculty 
was announced, that of Irving A. 
Sirken from instructor to assis- 
tant professor of economics. 

The leave of absence granted to 
Vincent Barnett, professor of 'Po- 
litical science, last year has been 
extended for one year. Mr Bar- 
nett is Program Review Officer in 
the EGA Mission to Italy. James 
MacGregor Burns, assistant pro- 
fessor of political science, was 
granted a leave of absence for the 
first semester of 1949-50, to en- 
able him to study in England, on 
a grant from the Social Science 
Research Council. 

English, Math Appointments 

Three new appointments were 
made to the English Department: 
Jack B. Ludwig, Stephen Stanton, 
and Robert W. Buttel as instruc- 
tors for one year. 

In the Mathematics Depart- 
ment, John S. Klein and David G. 
Meade were appointed instructors 
for one year.. A graduate of Ha- 
verford College, Mr. Klein was 
electronics engineer and physicist 
at the U S Naval Research Lab- 
oratory in Washington, D. C. 
from 1943-47. He comes to Wll- 



To the Editor of THE WILUAMS RECORD: 

Time marches on in the rest of the world, but within the walls 
of the Williams College community ponders the Williams College 
student, scratching his , head, sending his watch to Bastlen's, and 
falling to "make footprints Irt the sands of time" as he attempts to 
solve the time dilemma. Specifically, there are three or more time 
standards which differ In degree of accuracy by as much as eight 
to ten minutes occasionally and more often by five minutes or there- 
abouts. The three standards to which we refer are: 1) Williams 
College Bell (or Buzzer) Time; 2) Lasell Gymnasium Time: and 3) 
Social Unit or Radio Time, usually the nearest correct time standard. 

Remedy of this situation will not assure overall prompt at- 
tenilance at all college functions but it might enable one more per- 
son to get to one more place on time once more in one school year 
than he normally would under the present situation, it only that 
were accomplished, the improvement and Its sole result would be 
gratifying; application of the remedy would be Justified. 

As far as we personally are concerned, we want dnly to be In a 
position to eagerly anticipate the precise moment at which the bells 
of the Chapel will peal forth with their early morning rendition of 
"Three O'clock in the Morning" at eight o'clock in the morning. 

Howard Green, Jr. '50' 
May 5, 1949 Thomas T. Taylor '50 



hams from MIT where he has 
been a teaching assistant. 

Robert M. Gleason, a graduate 
of Williams summa cum laude in 
February 1949, has been appoint- 
ed instructor in political science 
for one year. Oliver M. Flanders, 
has been appointed lecturer in 
the AMT for one year. Flanders, 
an Amherst graduate who receiv- 
edo his M. F. A. at Yale replaces 
John Van Wart, who has resigned 
to continue his graduate study. 

Other new one year appoint- 
ments include Henry Peper, Jr., 



and Ernest J. Bianco as graduate 
assistants in chemistry, Norman J. 
Beckman, Carlton E. Davis, and 
Leo J. McCue as graduate assis- 
tants in physics, and Elizabeth L. 
Webb, junior assistant in the Col- 
lege Library. 

The following reappointments 
for one year from July 1 were 
made: Bernard Kessler, visiting 
lecturer In art, Norman Beyer, 
graduate assistant in physics, 
Charles H. Heuer, graduate assis- 
tant in physics, and Walter A. 
Sedelow, Jr,. instructor in history 



Fort Massachusetts 
Restaurant 



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Buffot'^uppon on Monday 
NiNi 01 usual 



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MEN! 

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Formal now. 

Delivery Guaranteed 
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NORTH ADAMS 



woe 



Totals 



37 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

riME TO EAT & THE PLACE 

TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



2 8 
r h e 
Trinity 201 032 201 11 12 1 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewicz, For Williams; Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



gether with George Femald '50 
and Richard Lippincott '50, was 

member of the Eph "chopping" 
team which stroked its way to a 
close second in the log chopping 
relay. Pernald and R. "Casey" 
Prime '50 also proved to be handy 
with axes as they won second 
place in the tree felling contest. 

Over sixty people camped over- 
night Friday and Saturday on a 
hill near the contest field. Teams 
from Dartmouth and Kimble Un- 
ion Academy bested the w;0C 
"loggers", but the six men showed 
a definite improvement over last 
years fifth place team by over- 
coming the U. ot Maine, McGlll, 
NoiTvich and a group of Dart- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor-' 
win '52, Fernald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 




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Hand Blocked Linen 
Cocktail Napkins 
Fish-Fly Highball Glasses 
Portable Bar 



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stuffed with Anchovies 

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Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 

COUNTRY SHOP -- North Street 




WILLrAMJTOWN 

MAJJACHUirrrs 






In anybody's book, ono of them 
it Marion Harpor, Jr. of Advar- 
titing't McCann-Erickton. Sold 
TIME-lato lait year: 



Just ten years ago, Marion Harper, 
Jr., frt'sh from Valo. got a job as ollict 
boy at McCann-Erickson, Inc., one ot 
the six largest U.S. advertising asen- 
cies. Tall (6 ft. i in.), strapping ( i()0 
Ills.) Harper was far from the (nil- 




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Bill Waiion, CoLPIo ,i 

Adman Harper 
He energizes people. 

sider's Idea of an advertising man. e 
was (|uiet and studious; he did ; t 
wear hand-painted ties, didn't .smc 
showed not a single huckster & ■ 
acteristic. 

, Hut he had been an office boy o' y 
three months when he was moved ii *i 
the copy research department wh f 
he could put his liking for market • 
search to work. Not long after. Har; r 
was made manager of Copy researi 
at 2i, only seven years after he li I 
left Yale, He was vice-president ii 
charge of research and merchandisin 
By bearing down on market sludii 
he helped boost the agency's billin. ^ 
from $46 million In 1946 to a 1948 r.' ■■ 
of more than $50 million. Last week 1 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion Harper w 
made president as Founder H. K. W 
Cann, 68. moved up to board chai - 
man. Said an awed.agcncy director. 1 
summarizing Harper's rise : "He em ■ 
gizes people . . . he's got so much ( ■ 
ergy iilmself . The agency has nevi r 
had'such good teamwork before." 

On Harper's team is his wife Vir- 
ginia, whom he met while she was ;i 
clerical worker at the agency and mar- 
ried in 1942. She Is now assistant ili- 
rector of McCann-Erickson's co|iy 
research department. Having no chil- 
drtn, Mr. & Mrs. Harper sometlrii-s 
stay at tife office until 2 a.m., working 
together. S.iys Mrs. Harper: "I think 
he's quite bright" 

Succaiifut adiniin 
Harpar raadt TIME 
•ach w**k— Of tl< 
man than 1,500,000 
olh*r U.S. colUg* graduaWi who 
flnd In TIME fha nawt Hmy «"■'' 
afford to mlu. 

To enter y4ur luburiptien to Tha 
WMkly Newimoaoxlna, St* any >' 
TIME'S Reprciantativn at Wllllami 
Coliaga - Barry Banapa, Sigma Pdi 
Fratarnlty - Coliaga BaokStora. 




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Price 1 cents 



es Honors 
and Crown 



■ - ic critic for the New York 
" M . appeared In the Friday 

nilng Issue of that paper. 

^Vhat Robert Barrow's tenure 

director of the Williams Glee 

' lb may be. I have no Idea, but 

work the young men did in 

'' «n Hall last night suggests 

t his option. If any. should be 

(wed Indefinitely— at last. In 

'■'\ case, till a larger number of 

■ '■'' local alumni appear than were 
; iisont for this program. Barrow 

oiik the absent In his stride as he 
'■"' the present In his confidence. 
■ bally annotating the music be- 
! c he conducted It. It made for 

' 'ongenlal as well as a rewarding 
' ' laslon. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
' ■ types — as. for that matter, do 
'I'o human materials of which 
See TOWN. Page 2 



Samoiloff Collection 

On Display At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
SamoUoft collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs Is on 
display In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included In this coliectlon are 
designs fcom Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of interest to theatre 
fans, jhe exhibition will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
talk by the collector herself. 
Carlene SamoUofr. 



the musicians In this area thrilled 
Jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles Illustrated — swing. 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop-c the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Boy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily .stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was .so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet;, instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
trombone,- Norm Olson at the 
piano. Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And SwInc 

The Dlxielanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenpy 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Fob" and 
"Gabardine and Serge/' Other 
performers In this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 
Harry Lewis, pianist Bill Parting- 
ton, and drummer John Davis. 

A swing outfit made up mostly 
of Purple Knights' members took 
See, JAZZ, Page 2 



New Issue Of COMMENT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



m 



.L- 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
Issue of COMMENT indicates that 
the "new" magazine Is firmly es- 
tablished and will maintain its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several Im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative account of Inter- 
service rivalries in the Pacific. 

If Professor Faison Intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading tor 
an intellectual approach, he states 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
. . " yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
Is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This issue of COMMENT Is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing problngs of a schizophrenic 
mind In "Jourtiey Without End". 
i Albert Qumey and Donald 
Froeb, freshmen, have written 
short stories of exceptional pro- 
mise. Qurney's "The Verge", one 
of the most impressive pieces in 
the issue, catches the quality of a 
tmall boy's observation with 






great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, is sensitive and well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place." Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style In a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop emotional tone. "Twilight 
and White Walls.'-viiowever. seems 
to jS&y-Joo much attention to the 
basic image, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins. William Tuttle. and John 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



^■y:.± . 



al. but most 
al is funny 
vlous taste, 
little piece 
; the issue" 
I quaint and 
J 'sketch de- 
le of life a I 

ms. Notable 
m from RPI 
St romantic 

Nash. This 

'g if cB w i p wYmH 'B'T K ' nia nce to refer 
to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a simillar comment. A tun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof, 



ribner Duo Downs 
^ Thurber In Finals 

by Pete Pickard 

nsion in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 

igland doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 

Jblnson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
sets; then the favorites turned on the steam 

7, 6-3, 6-2. 

> Billy Smith of Amherst 9opped 
the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday rhoniing and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with Iji points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and %. 
Doubles Teams Patent 
Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifmals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeilding 12-10. 7-5. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed through the stiffest fight of 
the tournament in the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo. which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman ScSres Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to ' 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced Into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Page 2 



uses 
nduct 

o Lead 

Ivisors 

!d at the UC 
.t that con- 
tlvities last 
be gentle- 
ct- He even 
milk-punch 
it the head 
, likeness to 

it such con- 
raging, and 
! 2 

llight 

Cow' 



stically call- 
iBual run of 

3f whatever 

selection is 

original hu- 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



Dr. Ijcster Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con's of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi house on Monday 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because It is part of a 
family tradition ie/, do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest in human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONES, Page 4 







woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday^ Afternoon 

Members of the Williams Out- 
ing Club will join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- _ 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m.. the group 
will entertain Itself by playing 
Softball and competing in some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 15 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weeltend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the afternoon. 
See woe, Page 2 







f ly^ %iil|fp(§ 



STEELE and WILES GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

BODY AND FENDER WORK 

MOTOR OVERHAULING 



North Adorm, Mossochusett s 



Wllllon 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 19' 
North Adbms, Massachusetts, under the Act of Mai 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, WiHiomstown, 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. "50 (Phon*; 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 

Norman S. Wood '50 .V , 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone:^81-M or 33) ....:.,.. 

Lonsina G. Scofield '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

Willlom R. Barney '49 ...v 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S: Bloschke, K. 

Editorial Stoff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Relch« 
1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Macloy, H 
Widing. 

Staff Photographer- ,ir .w. 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 ...;., 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 ..' 

Horry Frailer, III '51 

Douglas D Gorfield '50 Ai 

Barry Benepe A 

John Lund ■■.,.: 

W. Robert Mill '51 ,/. 

Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C 
R. Moil', H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bl<;kf< 
S. Humes,, C. Nason, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, 



TAKI YOUR f TOWN DATI TO 

The New Bowlaway 

BoWlING^VERY day EXCEPT SUNDAY 
FROM 3 P. M, UNTIL MIftNITE 
Union Stratt 



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VISTAS OF ftHAP$QOie RECOGNrnON/ 



opteAse.RAE::^ 

M/THBQW FEELS, 

LIKE A onic- 

CATIO NUTMK" 
AHOM/MXrri(S 
STALE AND 



Volume uaa 



MAY 11, 1948 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Rood 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX7 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SABINS 

,Cor. Holden & Center Sh. 
North Adomi 



AtOMlC 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 



THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

V Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Ray Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S . 
riME TO EAT & THE PLACE. 
TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 




Nine 

. The HlUt( 
assault by 
during the 
venth inning 
nal run in 1 
single by a 
other single 
diiced the 
in the sixt 
Purple oflen 
as twelte n: 
to go with 1 
ballplayers ( 
This after 
meet a po< 
Nine on Wei 
who are lea 
hftve' tost or 
Ijast year tt 
pie and Oe< 
count. Ditm 
Bob Olsson 
ers in what 
Ephmen's ti 
the year. 
WilUams lin 



Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewsl 
Healy, ss 
DeLisser, 3t 
Owen, rf 
Pisljer, « 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R., 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 

Totals 



Trinity 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewicz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



MnAMORNWHD (iii<t A mtr H e **) - 

trusfeniwdi 
NIPiNTHI (iM»i^ii-llw)-« iMHaii •• boM. 

hk |Mhi er mlHfy. 
NOl CiaARITTI HANOOVIR - ne Male 

•melnd-eet laiie; na Ught dry t ul lag la 

your threat Am la MiaUafl. 
RHANODK {wmp.U4Ak)-Amit*i wHh eaia. 

tiaa, UHMRy al Mlftit. 
SHAIO dthar^)— a brekea piete ar f ragaieat. 
VIRTIOINOUS (vin^H».m)-fiMy, Jbiy. 



NO CIGMEnE HANBOVER 

when you smoke 

PHILIP MORRIS 



PROVED DEFINITELY LESS IRRITATING 

than any other leading brand I 




Ciibs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



Norwich and a group of Dart- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Femald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the tr. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" extiibition race. 



amoKea l u i Key jp i BUU . i ' 

Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 




PartylQoersl 



J!WtJi_BIAk_NEWS 




(Our lee Creon*) is amazingly rich in butter fat ond 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice creom 
J, try it and convince yourself 

Borden Ice Cream Co. 



L G. BALFOUR CO'. 

FRATiRNITY JEWELRY 

Badges Ringt Steini 

Jewelry Gifh ^ Favon 

Slutieitery llfagraim 

Club Pint Keye 

Medolt Trophiee 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORiNUN 

30 Murray Ave. Waterford, N. Y. 

•Telephone Woterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

ond prornpt 

repair" servlc« 



Frank f rovencher. Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BMg. North Adomt' 




North Adomi 2214 



Wo Deliver 



DROP IN At 

"THE INN" 

On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! Informality is the rule 



In Shorts and Shht sleeves you are always welcome for a dritik or a bite to eat. 




actetistic. ^ 

But he had been an office boy 
three months when he was moved 
the copy research department v 
he could put his liking for marke: 
search to work. Not long after, Hu 
was made manager of copy reseu' 
at j8, only seven years after ho 
left Yale, he was vice-president ia 
charge of research and merchandi:;ing. 
By bearing down on market studies, 
he helped boost the agenc/s billin|!i 
from $46 million in 1946 to a 1948 rale 
of more than $50 milUon. Ijist week in 
Manhattan, at 31, Marion Harper «a« 
made president as Founder H. K. Mc- 
Cann, 68, moved up to board cllli^ 
man. Said an awed agency directcn in 
summarizing Harper's rise: "He clle^ 
gizes people . . . he's got so mucli (■n-_ 
efgy himself. The agency has ii( ver 
had such good teamwork before." 

On Harper's team is his wife Vir- 
ginia, whom he met while she vms a 
clerical worker at the agency and mar- 
ried in 194J. She Is now assistant di- 
rector of McCann-Erickson's lopy 
research department. Having no 1 hil- 
4tm,- Mr. &- Mrs. Harper Mmelinjes. 
stay at the office imtil 1 a.m., workini 
together. Says Mrs. Harper: "I ll>inli 
he's quite bright." 

luccetiful adman 
Harper reads TIMI 
each week— a» ^' 
mere than I.SOO.OM 
ether U.t. college graduates wl>* 
Ond In TIMI the news thf ""'* 
ailotd te mis*. 

Te enter yeer subtcrlpMa^ *» ^ 
Weekly Newimeeasine, Se* my •< 
TIME'S RepretenferlYet e» WiW**" 
Cellege - lerry Benepe, Slfine ^ 
rreterMty . Cellefl* leek Mere. 




ALWAYS READY 
TO SERVE 

WILLIAMS Men 



Wittamst 





















National 




Bank 



SAFETY DEPOSIT 
BOXES 



CHECKING AND 
SAVING ACCOUNTS 



Member of Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corp, 



LBTTERS Tt0 
THE EDITOnS 



■^ 



WILLIAMS COLLIOI 

Dear Sir: 

In the past, your publication 
has represented the epitomy of 
virtue. Your fair, unprejudiced 
journalism has been of the high- 
est quality. You have not stoop- 
ed to the disgusting level of the 
myriad of low-brow publica- 
tions that flood our news stands 
and corrupt the sweet innocence 
of our glorious American youth. 
But your vile article on Williams 
College (and especially the vile 
picture of that Peggy woman) 
has shattered the clean record of 
your fine past. I do not know 
how you can justify your action 
before the eyes of altnighty God. 
I am cancelling my subscrip- 
tion immediately. 

Miss Prudence FLrrE 
Home for the Aged 
Fairfield, Conn. 



Comrade: \ 

I dream of the day when the 

tramp, tramp, tramp of laboring, 
feet shall echo through the sta- 
tely ehns of Williamstown. 

Vrro Marcanfonio 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

. ,Oh peachy I I've been out of 
Williams for only three months 
but I can hardly wait for re- 
untonl Goodyl 

Mke RopBiNs '49-F 

Dear Sir: 

It is wonderful to see that one 
college has continued the fight 
against mass produced educa- 
tion. Where but at Williams 
could you shoot a cannon 
through the middle of the li- 
brary without hitting anyone? 
No where but at Williams. What 
was good enough for Eph Will- 
iams and his log is good enough 
for the present undergraduates. 
Reginald Frumpfh 
Bellevue Medical Center 
New York City. 

GARGOYLE 

Dear Sir: 

Gargoyle has long been a 
force on the Williams campus. 
They have been short on pub- 
licity, but the Ust of their ac- 

CONTIKUED ON NEXT PAGE 



Thrlllt — RACING — AeH«ii 

Ey«ry Wednctdoy Nit« — At 8:15 P. M. 
Mighty Midgah Run 

Every Sunday — At 2:30 P. M. 
Stock Cora — Spills Colore 

EMPIRE RACEWAYS 



MENANPS— 



TELEPHONE S9493 



DO YOU WANT TO MAKE 
A HIT THIS WEEK-END? 

DON'T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY ... 
to combat the 
SCORCHING HOT 




Evenings with o cool, 

foshionoble 

HASPEL CORD 

or SEERSUCKER 




Loose fitting and 

"Refreshable" but 

"handsomely" styled 

to your taste 



<. 



I^aspel 



Haspel "refreshable" 

clothes hove what it takes 
to make a Hot Day breeze 
by Into the cool of the 
evening. 




THE SMARTEST COOL SUIT 
THE COOLEST SMART SUIT 

Ububp of Halsli 



More than a Toggery 



A Williams Institution 




Price 1 cents 



« Honors 
ind Crown 



Wner TJuo Downs 
I, Thurber In Finals 

J by ^ete Pickard 
islon in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 
jigland doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 
>blnson and Pete "Thurber. The battle was even 
sets; then the favorites turned on the steam 
7. 6-3, 6-2. ..^ 

o Billy Smith of Amhersj: copped 
the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
f ^^ favored to win. but the YaUes 
'ff'CI' were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
tuday morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for WUlifims to 
snare the meet with IJjl points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and %. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 




Lead 

Ivisurs 



>i 




music critic for the New York 
i^iin , appeared in the Friday 
nmming issue of that paper. 

"What Robert Barrow's tenure 
:o director of the Williams Qlee 
Club may be, I have no Idea, but 
tiie work the young men did in 
lawn Hall last night suggests 
iiiat his option. If any, should be 
renewed indefinitely— at last, in 
any case, till a larger number of 
ihe local alumni appear than were 
present for this program. Barrow 
took the absent in his stride as he 
(lid the present in his confidence, 
^'oi'bally annotaUng the music be- 
fore he conducted it. It made for 
a congenial as well as a rewarding 
occasion. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
to types— as, for that matter, do 
the human materials of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



c ,. Jt.n. .. . and John Ferguson at 
5 am o i l < t ffX ^l«ction — j] nop And bwI 

On Display At AMT 



Throughout this week (he 
SamoiloS collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs Is on 
display In the' shop of the AMT. 
Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet," Oll- 
w Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Itftma of Interest to theatre 
fans, The exhlblUon will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
talk by the collector herself. 
Csjiene SamoUofl. 



-«•»■ 



the musicians in this area thrilled 
Jam lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
coacert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles illustrated— swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop— the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old Jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, tastrumentallsts In the 
Dixieland group included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
trombone, Norm Olson at the 
piano, Bill Peytai playtog banjo, 
■ the drums. 
Bop And Bwlng 

The Dlxielanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos oil 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played.'' 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Keb Pob" and 
"Oabardine and Sergej" Other 
performers In this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 



TOtnBsu^rn^nMIkrN 1 features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
issue of COMMENT indicates that 
the "new" magazine is firmly es- 
tablished and will mamtain its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

'The issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Bums draws several im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and Informative account of Inter- 
servlce rivalries in the JPaclflc. 

If Professor Paison intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded adi&irabiy. Pleading for 
an intellectual approach, he states' 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
,.,jL'.-yetth« timely .tKeme-ot-"AnyT 
bo^ Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This Issue of COMMENT is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing probings of a schizophrenic 
mind in "Journey Without End". 

Albert Oiuney and Donald 



Froeb, fteshmen, have written 
Hw^Lewis^PlwiistBlU parting- short stories of exceptional pro- 
ton, and drummer John Davis. I mise. Oumey's "The Verge", one 
A swing outfit made up 'mostly of the most impressive pieces In 
of purple Knights' members took the i^e. e^t^hes^thequajlty of^a 
See JAZZ, Page 3 



small boy's observation with 



great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, Is sensitive sttid. well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstandmg poetical work is 
RusselJ Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm ot T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop. empUonalJiOTej__'J'I>Hlght 
and White Walls." however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
bEusic image, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wmd" is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle, ' and Jcdm 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of stylesr 



al, but most 
al is funny 
vious taste, 
little piece 
; the issue" 
k tpiaint and 
t llEetch de- 
le of life at 

otable 
RPI 
lantic 
This 
IHimmpB||gBr«fnmce to refer 
to the "Pupl^as "pleasantly PU- 
thy" ahd a thoroughly ent«rtain- 
mg magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a similiar ooqunent. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof. 

Pr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



d at the UC 
t that con- 
Uvities last 
be gentle- 
st He even . . 

milk-punch ''ut in the semifinals they ran in 
,t the head to a determined pair from Spring- 
Ukeness to "e'd that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeildlTig 12-10, 7-6. Both 8p- 
,t such con- ringfield men had strong services 
rating, and and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed- -throusOi -the sUffest fight-of- 
the tournament m the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were tovlnclbly steady to the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, 7-8. <■ 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Oreene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-6 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to provldmg 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rrls of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced Into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Pace 2 




Dr. Lester Jones, Williams '13, 
of" the Massachusetts Oeneral 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con'^ of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi bouse ^nM^ijiay. 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest in human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many, manifestations of 
Science in medicine. Untor- 
See JONB8, Page 4 



woe Tq Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 

XJn»wi |Kfwf| ftf ♦Kit ^»" "l»».i r\..^ 

Ing Club will Join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Oreylock on Sun-i 
day. 1' 

Meeting at 11 aju., the group 
win entertain itself by playing 
Softball and competing In some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which WOO members participated 
In at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as Its main dish will provide the 
group with a restmg period be- 
fore the beginning ot a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the afternoon 

a(ewoc,s»gea 



f ^e Wiiiyi^ 



North Adoms, Massachusetts 



Wllliar 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, )9 
North Adbms, Massachusetts, under the Act of Mo 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Willlomstown, 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 11 = 

Herbert D. Mphring '50 , 

Norman S. Wood '50 .. .! , 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) 

Lonsing G. Scofield '50 

Wolter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke, K, 



Editorial Staff: 1951- E. 
1952- R. Duffield, 
.Widing. 
Staff Photogropher • 



Jones, B. Perry, F. Reich 
G. Ki.nter, W. Maclay, 



John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 ..-.^.TrnTT^^-fr..-frrr^^,f^ 

Edward L. Stackhouse '50 ..'. ■':. 

Horry Frozler, III '51 

Douglas D. (Sorfield '50 

Barry Benepe ^ 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 



OUTDOOR CHAIRS $2.29 up \ 

TRAY STANDS $4.50 
GLASSWARE DANCE WAX . 

Qearge M. Hopkins Co, 

UTAILISHID 1«88 

STUDENT AND HOME FURNITURE 

66 Spring Street Phone 29-R Williomttown, Mom. 




QUINN'S 

WALLPAPER AND PAINT STORE 



HILO 



PAINTS 



VARNISHES 



ENAMELS 



Business Staff; 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort,. P. 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951 - P. Avery, C 
R. Moll-, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickfi 
S. Humes, C. Noson, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, 



Volume LXm 



MAY 11, 1&48 



TYPING DOnKi 

Mrs. Barbara Thomp/on 
Simonds Rood 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEIXlSFOR RENT 
ANY SIZE ' 

SABINS 

,Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adoms 



AtWNlC 



WEDNESDAY . 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 



THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Fedfure: 6:40 - 8:45 ^ 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Roy Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S , 
TIME TO EAT & JHE PLACE: 
TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



WALLPAPERS OF DISTINCTION 



Nine 

The HUlt 
assault by 
during the 
venth Innln 
nal run in 
single by I 
other singU 
duced the 
in the sixt 
Purple offe) 
as twelve 
to go with 
ballplayers 

This aftei 
meet a po^ 
Nine on We4 
who are leai 
have lost on 
Last year th 
pie and Oeq 
count. Ditml 
Bob Olsson i 
ers in what 
Ephmen's t( 
the year. 
WilUams lln 

Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewsk 
Healy, ss 
DeLisser, 3b 
Owen, rt 
Pl^er, If 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R., ( 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 

Totals 



Trinity 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewioz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



Head start to 

SUCCESS... 

with an 




ELCIN 



(jrnili 



.:! I'fii iM ail riitl 
and u l«-pinniii<i. :hi(I h 
time never Ic Ik* f'dirolu'ii 
becaiiHc yttii };.m ': llir 
tradllioiiol "ifl- an Klein 



EUiti lit Imu; l7/rinh,a:l/aa(nl. KiK 
naliiriil fiAd filled hiiiprd fa..', tiir/i i/*. 



cini tlirrv-facrt i 
iiMiiv lininl. $0', 



v,l„l. Cold filM l:.l 

.-•0 



K«in f*# /.(I If. 1(7 hettt 
■ „f,„u/,..M/i//„/V,7.,.. 



,r...l ^■ 



Wdiil,. Ml^iii 
i-oliJi'l'':il iiiiu-l 

till* iiijv \. .Ill I 

!l!i:jl' ■ \l 

\li\i\ .'i;:iiii.;il. 

•.>,ii.i, ,-.-i...;'- 1\ 

O'H-.illi' 1,1 If 



rk'*r|>ijli; - 
:l, .,;;!, lb- 



On'v (IGltj ^oj f/ie *^ O'ToPower Mai/ispr 




LETTERS TO 
THE EDITORS 

cdmpUshments is long. The pic- 
ture y^ran in your filthy red 
fascist sh>et of boys awaiting 
gargoyle tapping^is a thoroughly 
unwarranted attack on that glo- 
rious organization. x^ 

Abebchombie JdN^s '27 
New York City. '• '\^ 



Dear Sir: 

Even before I decide^ to 
come to Williams, my family 
told me that I looked just like a 
gargoyle. I was very disappoint' 
ed not to be tapped. I waited on 
the fence too. \yhat happened? 
^ > " Jack Gibson '50 
WillitHifstowp. Mas s. ---- . 



Dear Sir: 

At last some courageous pub- 
lication has exposed the Gar- 
gles for what they are. Your pic- 
ture clearly shows the confident 
looks of expectation upon the 
faces of those expecting to be 
tapped. Do they realize that 
they really should be waiting to 
assume new duties, new res- 
ponsibilities? No! They're just 
waiting to get their gargoyle 
pins so they can go have a par- 
ty. Why not tap everyone and 
have a good blow? 

A non member 
Cholmondeley Frink '32 
Zenith, Indiana 



PEGGY 

Capitalist: 

The Ministry of Public En- 
hghtenment has prepared an ex- 
tensive study on your article 
concerning the Bennington in- 
cident. Typical Bourgeois a- 
musement. In glorious Russia, 
women work on the farms. 

Boris Katchkinov 
P. S. What mean it "grind"? 

Dniepertrovitskodovitch, Siberia 

■' ' ■ »«■ 

Dear Sir: 

You were sweet to run an ar- 
ticle on our little number. It 
really isn't much, we're just try- 
ing to please the boys in our 
own shy way. I would appre- 
ciate it if you would ask the 
dear boy with the crew cut and 
dark glasses to return that part 
of the costume' that he swiped. 
You know how important it is 

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 



Alwoyi 
Ready 
To S«rv« 

WILLIAMS MEN 

With 
PIPES, TOBACCO 

CIGARETTES 
and NOVELTIES 

Magazines 6 subscrlptipnf 

^ THE"" 
>EMiS STORE 

Spriii9 St. PhoiM 495 

Typ«writeri told ' 

and repaired 



Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



Norwich and a group of Dart^ 
mouth alunmi. 

Donald Gregory '50, Rofeer Cor- 
win '52, Femald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhiBllk>n foi|r man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



Party^iQoersl 



HERE IS REAL NEWS 




(Our Ice Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat and 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILAiiLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(Af meal time) Bordens is truly a superior Ice cream 
try it and convince yourself 

Borden lee Cream Co. 



North Adamt 2214 



We Deliver 



" J ii njr. e u 



-t u ii k c y j(j ie uu 

Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 



L G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Bodgai Rings Steint 

Jewelry ' GIftt Fovert 

SfoHenciy Proflromi 

Club Pins Keys 

Madols Trophies 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murroy Ave, Woterford, N. Y. 

Telephone Woterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repolr" service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adams' 




DROF IN AT 




"THE INN" 

\ 

On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! Informality is the rule 



In Shoftsjmd Shirt sleeves you are always ivelcome fcr, 



\ 



^ X>/ •' ""•." '-'"-""« for a drftifc ota bitem m 

^J*_ ^ ^ 

■'■ i . \ III 



Here She 

C^mes! 




GET READY 

Hurry down end get a bottle 
of Hootch so that, you con 
provide her a Real Welcome 

Also 
GINGER ALE 

SODA 

GROCERIES 

PARTY DELICACIES 

Square 
Deal 

Spring St. Williomstown 




acteristic. 

But he had been an oflici' v only 
three months when he was n d i"'" 
the copy research departnn wn*" 
he could put his liking for i <rt re- 
search to work. Not long afti i i laip" 
was made manager of copy t ^'^'^, 
at j8, only seven years aftf he Md 
left Yale, be was vice-pn ilfnl m 
charge of research and mercli; ndisi* 

By bearing down on marki t ^tudiB 
he helped boost the agency billinp 
from $46 million in 1946 to a 1148™'' 
of more than $50 million. Lnsi weekln 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion H |)erwi! 
made president as Founder 1! K. M<- 
Cann, 68, moved up to bom I dm'- 
man. Said an awed agency (Im itor,!" 
summarizing Harper's rise ; He «"' 
gixes people . . . he's got so n.uch en- 
ergy himself. The agency )i s M>fH 
had such good teamwork bifuc. 

On Harper's team is his vile Vir- 
ginia, whom he-niet while shi' WM « 
clerical worker at the agency mo m- 
ried in 1943. She is now a.ssisiant «■ 
rector of McCann-Erickson's cw 
research department. Having no w"" 
dren, Mr. & Mrs. Harper si.meim" 
stay « Ihe-office unUl 1 a.m . 7*"» 
together. Says Mrs. Harper; "I ['"» 
he's quite bright. 

Succetiful «*»*' 
Harper repd* ^''J' 
•och wok-''^* 

„ . m.i» then 1,S0O^ 

Mlwr U.I. college graduolei ««• 
flnd In TIMI the n«w» tli*Y **" 
•fferrf to mlu. 

To enter year sybscrl^Wee l» 
Weolilr Newsmoseilne, See eW__ 
TIME'S R«»resenl«tl»es ot W»*" 
Collof e - iorry tenepe, *••• "^ 
Pietamlty - Calieee ieok **•••• 




'■i,ii.-'.- 




SERVING WILLIAMS MEN 
THE YEAR AROUND 



TACONIC LUMBER CO. 



WilllQmitown 



Phone 122 




ARROW 
ARA COOL 
ENSEMBLES 



i 



For a successful summar— job seeking or vacationing— 
you'll moke a good impression anywhere with o cool Ara 
Cool eniemble. 

Sea your Arrow deoic'r todayl Ara Cool shirts come in 
white and solid colors and are accompanied by harmoniz- 
ing Arrow ties and Arrow handkerchiefs. 

ARROW 

SHIRTS and TIES 
UNDERWEAR • HANDKERCHIEFS • SPORTS SHIRTS 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDMTORS 



.CONTINUIO- 



to our number. 
Bennington, Vt. 



MiMI 



Dear Sir: 

Speaking as one who knows, 
I think WiUiams men are 
charming. Very recently I have 
been intimately connected with 
some of the nicest ones. Among 
other things, I have noticed that 
all WiUiams boys are cleanly 
shaven. You don't know what 
this has meant to me. Hoping to 
see you again next year. 

Your humble mistress 
Peggy 
Bennington, Vt. / 

Dear Sir: 

I was very surprised to see the 
picture of Peggy O'Day in your 
current issue and learn of her 
position viath the Bennington 
carnival. Enclosed is a pichire 
of her taken thirteen years ago 
in Cheyenne, Wyoming, when I 
knew her as a poverty stricken 
but sweet and innocent young 
girl. (I couldn't make a nickel 
our first date.) 

Jonathan Jonas 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 




Dear Sir: 

The interest in great litera- 
ture on the subject: "The Sex- 
ual Side of Marriage," my book, 
and "The Male Hormone," as 
well as in Peggy shows that at 
last college boys are admitting 
the presence of sex. Liberalism 
in sex education is at last in- 
vading the cloistered walls of 
our American educational in- 
stitutions. Does Williams offer 
a course in sex education? 

Alfred C. Kinsex 
Indiana University 



ACOMIC 



SATURDAY 

Roy Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS HICK BEAL 

Feature 640 - 8:45 

SUNDAY — MONDAY 

Pot O'Brien Robert Ryan 

BOY WITH THE 
GREEN HAIR 

Feature 6:40 -| 8:45 

TUESDAY 

Vivian Leigh Rex Harrison 

STORM IN A TEACUP 

Feature 7:00 - 9:00 



GENERAL 

STARK 
THEATRE 

BENNINGTON, VT. 



Shows ot 7 and 9 



SUNDAY, May 15 only 

Madeleine Carroll 

Fred MocMurray 

in 

DON'T TRUST 

YOUR 

HUSBAND 



MONDA'Vf'TUESDAY ond 
WEDNESDAY 

May 16. 17 ond 18 

Bing Crosby Rhode Fleming 

Sir Cedric Hardwicke 

in 

Connecticut 

Yankee In King 

Arthur's Court 




Price 1 cents 



s Honors 
md Crown 



ibmrDixarDmms 
Thurber In Finals 




Lead 
MBurs 

d'^t the UC 
t ,that con- 
Uvities last 
■IIe gentle- 
st.'' He even 
l^^k-punch 
.t-th? Jiead 
likeness to 

sl^ljiich con- 
niring, and 

VI 



music critic for the New York 
Sun , appeared In the Friday 
morning Issue ot that paper. 

"What Robert Barrow's tenure 
as director of the Williams Oiee 
Club may be, I have no Idea, but 
the work the young men did In 
Town Hall last night suggests 
that his option. If any, should be 
renewed indefinitely— at last. In 
any case, till a larger number of 
the local alumni appear than were 
present for this program. Barrow 
took the absent In his stride as he 
did the present In his confidence, 
verbally annotating the music be- 
fore he conducted It. It made for 
a congenial as well as a rewarding 
occasion. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
to types — as, for that matter, do 
the human materials of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



Samoiloff Collection 
On Di8pl«y At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
Samoiloff collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs Is on 
display In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of Interest to theatre 
fans. The exhibition will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
talk by the collector herself, 
Carlene Samollotl. 



the musicians In this area thrilled 
jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles Illustrated— swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop— the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old Jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." .Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
trombone. Norm Olson at the 
piano, Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And Swing 

The Dliflelanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched in between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
"Oabardine and Serge/' Other 
performers In this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorttian 
Harry Lewis, pianist BiU Parting- 1 
ton, and drummer^ John Davis 



JNew Issue Of COMMEJNT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmten 



by F. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
Issue of COMMENT indicates that 
the "new" magazine is firmly es- 
tablished and will maintain Its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Bums draws several im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative accoimt of inter- 
service rivalries in the Paciflc. 

If Professor Falson Intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
'kn Intellectual approach, he states' 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
. . " yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - XJt Say» Here)'' 
is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This issue of COMMENT Is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing probings of a schizophrenic 
mind in "Journey Without End". 

Albert Oumey and Donald 
Froeb, freshmen, have wrlttten 
short stories of exceptional pro- 



i mlse. Oumey's "-The Verge", one 
A swing outfit made up mostly of the most impressive pieces in 
of Purple Knights' memb^took the issue, catches Uie qu^ty of a 
See JAZZ, P8«e 2^ " " " " ~"*" 



•mall boy's observation with 



great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, is sensitive and well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the mag^lne. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a line 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop emotional tone. "Twilight 
and 'White Walls," howevCT, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic image, and too little to, the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
.able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of tbf seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, WlUlam Tuttle,"and John 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



to the '^Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and^ thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a slmiliar comment. AiJHm- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 - 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof, 



by |>ete PIckard 

m in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 
,nd doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
if ending champs Fred Scrlbner and Charlie 
ison and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
then the favorites turned on the steam 
3, 6-2. 

O Billy Smith of Amherst copped 
the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
lu-day morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with 1« points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and ii. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scrlbner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifinals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Sprmg- 
tield that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeildlng 12-10, 7-5. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed thirough-the stiffest fight -of 
the tournament In the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares SaUun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaim, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset Of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale In the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Page 2 




it whatever 
■^Election is 
Mlginal hu- 



(d, but most 
ti is funny 
vious taste 
Uttle 'piece 
) Ihe issue" 
1 4j|ualnt and 
I Sketch de- 
i« 'Of life at 

ci. Notable 
Wtrom RPI 
tt^^omantlc 

1 1 ■■ ■ ■ m ce to' refer 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



Dr. Ijester Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spo^e on the pro's and 
con's ofttie medical profession as 
a career In a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi house on Monday 
night; - •--- - 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest in human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONBIS, Page 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sutfday Afternoon 

Membera of aie_WlllliMn8 Out- 
ing "ClaB will JoE the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m., the group 
will entertain Itself by playing 
Softball and competing in gome 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish wlU provide the 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a acavenger 
hunt scheduled for ijie afternoon. 
Sm 'WOC, Pkge a 




f ^« mmyip.^ 



North Adorns, Mossochusetts 



Wlllior 



"Entered as sacond-class matter Noventber 27, 19' 
North Adbms, Massachusetts, uruJer the Act of Mai 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Ajjoms, i 
Wednesday and Saturday during the coHege yeor. 
•~pefYear< Record Office, iesup.Holl, Williomstown,^ 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-AA or 11' 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 ' 

Norman S. Wood '50 •■ 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) 

Lansing G. Seofield '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 ■••■ 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Blaschke, K. 

Editorial Stoff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reich< 

1952- R. Duf field, G. KInter, W. Mocloy, I- 

.j Widing. 

Staff Photographer'..: 



VETS TAXI 



PHONE 96 



ANYTIME 



ANYPLACE 



A 
A 



John S, Prescott, Jr '50 __ _ 

Edward L.Stbckhouse 50' 

Harry Frailer, III '51 

Douglas D. Gorfield 'SO 

Barry Benepe 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 

Business Stoff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C 
R. Moil, H. Voorhis. 1 952- A. Bell, D. Bickfi 
S. Hufnes, C. Noson, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, 



GRAMERY PARK CLOTHES 

Sharkskin 2-ply tuit* — $50 
--^— Sharkskin 2-ply suth — $5 ^ 

Rayon suits from — $30 
separote coats from $12.95, rayon & se«rsuek«r 

JAYSON SHIRTS 



PURITAN SPORTS WEAR 

Gabardine slack from $10.95 



Tolume LXIU 



MAY 11, 1948 



UCtwrmontt^liiiBaVlr wii^ ^ 



312 MAIN STREET ^ 
BENNINGTON, VERMONT 



LIFE'S 
REPORTS 



According to latest census est- 
imates, some 415 dates have In- 
vaded Williamstown this week- 
end. Smith, perennial favorite, 
leads the parade with 46 girls 
reported, followed by Benning- 
ton's 32, 26 from Mt. Holyoke, 
25 from Vassar and 18 from 
Wellesfey. ^ , 

Last spring, almost 600 girls 
were reported coming, while 
this year s Winter Carnival drew 
540 dates to Billville. Smith, 
Holyoke, Vassar and Wellesley 
have always stood in that order 
on the popularity poll among 
the big four, but this spring, 
with Bennington again in ses- 
sion, our "sister school" has 
moved up into second place on 
th" hit para de. 



Printing 

Books, ..catalogs, ..publications 
ond commercial forms to meet 
your sptelficotlons. 

Stotionary 

A most opproprlote o'**' We 
hove large and fine anort- 
ment moderately priced. Print- 
ed or blank. 

Office Supplies 

Printed forms, typewriter paper 
and ribbons, perKlls, pens, 
rubber stamps, Ink, carbon, 
binders, fillers, etc. 

Art Material 

■Drawing paper, linoleum blocks, 
cutting tools, oil and water 
colors, brushes, canvas ond 
drawing boards, T-squares, 
French curves, protroctors, ar- 
tists' pastels, show cord paints, 
crayons. 

Greeting Cards 

Large assortment for oil oc- 
casions. Also wrappings, rib- 
bons, and colored tope. 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SABINS 

,Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adorns 



ACCJNIC 



WEDNESDAr, 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7|00 - 9:00 



THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feofure: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY''- SATURDAY 

Ray Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



Nine- 

The HUlt 
assault by 
during the 
venth Innli 
nal run In 
single by ] 
other slngl 
duced the 
in the sixl 
Purple offei 
as twelve 
to go with 
ballplayers i 

This after! 
meet a poil 
Nine on Wea 
who are lea 
have lost oii 
Last year th 
pie and Geo 
count. Dltmi 
Bob Olsson e 
ers in what| 
Ephmen's t(| 
the year 
WilUams Un 

Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewsk: 
Healy, ss 
DeUsser, 3b 
Owen, rf 
Fisljer, If 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R., ( 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Maiming 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p. 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 

Totals 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S . 
riME TO EAT & THE PLACE, 
TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 




CqI may not carry Goat's Milk but he 

does have plenty of BEER and WINES 

both domestic and imported. 

Domestic Beers and Ales 



Budweiser 

Bailantlnes 

Schlitx 

Schaefer 

Beverwyck 

Beverwyck Irish Cream 

Blatz Pilsner 

Goebel 

Pabst 

Prior 

Krueger 



Krueger Ale 
Genesee . 
Genessee Ale 
Corling's 
Corlings Ale 
Ballontine's Ale 
Homden Ale 
Schmidt's 
Pickwick Ale 
Norragonsett 
Ruppert 



Also your favorite brands of wine 
SO MAKE YOUR CHOICE AND GET IT AT 

King's Pkckage Store 

Spring St. Open till 1 1 



ALPHA DELTA PHI 

Purcell, Joan Dowd, Man'nville 
French, Deborah Cole, Br'cliff 
Gushee, Emma Dogan, Dut. Res 
Thomas, Jane Treman, Bennett 
Louis, Julie Delescailles, Bent. 
VanDusen, Pat McKean, Sm. 
Cooper, Harriet Bouvey, P. Ma. 
Finlay, Jan Shawman, Conn. 
Tone, Bunny Day, Bradford 
Perkins, Mary Hammerley, Con. 
Geniesse, Anne Templeton, 

Marymount 
Elicker, Gerry Brown, Drexel H. 
MacManus, Zoe Kenniston, Vt. 
Missimer, Mary Parker, Em'aW. 
Stowers, Anne Leath, Skidmore 
Fox, Mickey Fincheimer, R'cliffe 
Brown, Pat Allen, Marymount 
Brooks, Pat Roth, Connecticut 
Smith, Shirley Marshall, Ros'mt 
Bates, Sue Mallory, Mt. Holyoke 
Pelham, Peggy Hobbs, Gar'sn F. 
Wright, Shirley Coxe, Baldwin 
Thexton, Sally Richardson, Ben't 
lensch, Margaret Richardson, 
■■ B. Mawr 

McCbrmick, Diane MacNeille 
Dana H. 

BETA THETA PI 

Halleck, Carolyn Wood, Sk'm're 
Coldwell, Pat Goodwin, Ohio S. 
Avery, Winann Meyer, Conn. C. 
Burgoyne, Phebe Kley, Smith 
Rogers, Alice Cowdry, Wel'ley 
Pusey, Nancy Wagner, Holyoke 
Barker.Janie FortC Conn. Col. 
Luthy, Joan McMuUin, B. U. 
Bardes, Patsy Ryan, Finch 
Moir, Mary Dangler, Bennett 
Neilsen, Judy Parker, Holyoke 
Graef, Barbara Ahlers, Skidm're 
Hughes, Nancy Harvier, N. R. 
Hoeck, Joan Johnson, U.of Okla. 
Hutton, B, Joanna Pfaff, Smith 
Hutton.G, Sylvia Breuchaud 

Brearley 
Wynn, Peggy Kind, Wheelock 
Donoho, Dorothy Robinson, Sm. 
Rowan, Judy Payers, NYC 

VanAnda, Martha Little, CenJC 
Birmingham, Sue Spencer, Sm. 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 19 




Printer - SlalieiMr 

WILLIAMSTOWN 



ROSASCCyS TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

Air - Rtll ' Bus - Steemship 

TEL. 399 

90 Mtln Street North Adimt 




SlCAUSi TMV PUPAUe PM 
SMOOTH VACATION D«VMO WITH OUt 

• adjust brakes 

• adjust clutch 

• check steering 

• tune engine 

• inspect electrical 

system 

• lubrication 

• inspect tires 




HERBERT A. ORR CO. 



Citrran Highway 
Nartli Adonit, Mom. 






Trinity i _ 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewioz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man' teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



Norwich and a group 6f UAft- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Femald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



M iii unuu i u ii< .i,y .jp r cuu 



Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 





FartylQoers! 



HERE IS REAL NEWS 



(Our Ice Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat ond 
, Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try it and convince yourself 

Borden lee Cream Co. 



North Adams 2214 



We Deliver 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 



FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Bodgei Rings Steint 

Jewelry Giftt Fovan 

Statieitery Pregranu 

Club Pint Keyi 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Waterford, N. Y. 

Teleiihone Waterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 
■^v, repair' service 




Frtenk Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adams' 



jmOEOH^^O^ 




"THE INN" 

On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 



REMEMBER! 



Informality is the rule 



In Shorts and Shirtsleeves you are always welcome for a dritik or a bite to 



eat. 



I acteristic. 

But he Jiad been an oflSo y only 
three months when he was n ti 1"" 
the copy research departm' wl«« 
he could put his lilting for i kct re- 
search to work. Not long afti Haip" 
was made manager of copy r se'"'!; 
at 28, only seven years afl' tie M» 
left Yale, he was vice-pn ilent o 
charge of research and mertl. nduinj 

By bearing down on mark : stoats, 
he helped boost the agency « bilUnp 
from $46 million in 1946 '» ■' ' "'•'P!' 
of more than $50 million. La^l week in 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion H rper ws 
made president as Founder 1 ' K. Mt- 
Cann, 68, moved up to bo I dm'- 
man. Siid an awed agency d i ictor, w 
summarizing Harper's rise: "e*"''' 
giies people . . . he's got so iiuch en- 
ergy himself. The agency ^.'i f" 
had such good teamwork bt lire. 

On Harper's team is his vife Vir- 
ginia, whom he met while she WM« 
clerical worker at the agency indrnw- 
ried in 1942. She is now assistant o- 
rector of McCann-Ericksim 9 m 
research department. HavinR no » i- 
dren, Mr. & Mrs. Harper sumetme^ 
slay at tBe office uritil 5 a.m.. wMf"» 
together. Sayi Mrs. Harper. 1 tni"" 
he's quite bright. 

Suceatiful a**'' 
Harper reads Tl»< 
.ach week-ei «"• 

^ m.«th-n1,500>» 

othsr U.I. eoll»»» eraduatei »*• 
dnd tn TIME A. new* iM *" 
tiWorJ to mti*. 
To enter yeHr sybserlpflon •• ^ 
Weekly ,N««««...I".. «•• 'jj,^ 

Cellege - •arry ieMpe, »!•« 
PrMemtty - C«H«fle ••••' ***" 



! 




I 



North Adoma, MossochuwH s 



Wllllom»town, Motsochusatts 



"Entered os second-clais matter Novertiber"' 27, 1944, at the post office ot 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March. 3, 1879." Printed by 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Holl, Wllllomstown, Telephone 72. 



-Veliime LXIII 



MAY V4, 1948 



Number 17 



■Richords J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113) Editor 

Herbert D; Mohring '50 ., , ,. „ 

Norman S. Wood '50 Managing Editors 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) News Editor 

William R. Barney '49 Senior Associote 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 - 

Walter P. Stern '50 .'. Sports Editors 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke. K. F. X. Delony, J. Gibson, 

John 'S. Prescott, Jr. '50 _ , 

Edward L. Stackhouse '50 Business Manager 

Horry Frailer, III '51 Advertising Monoger 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 ,,,.. Ass't Advertising Monoger 

Barry Benepe ,,' ,,,,_..,,, ,, Asst, Advertising Monoger 

■ John Lund .,,;i.^„.,c„..„™,_,^„,wmr7Tr7-„-frt^-,-,-TTrrT:TrT;,,, Circulation Manager 
-W. Robert Mill '51 Treosurer 




THIS WEEK'S COVER 

Wherever Williams men meet, the 
controversial theories of the day are 
sure to be drowned in a flask of Johnny 
Walker's Red Label, During classes 
flasks are concealed beneath large coon- 
skin coats worn by the 21-year-old Re- 
publicans on this week's cover, Pete 
Fisher and Marc Reynolds chat between 
classes on the steps of Griffin Hall, They 
typify the characteristic ability of the 
Williams man to combine studies and 
healthy diversion. 



IN WILLIAMSTOWN WHEN 
YOU THINK OF 
GYM 
YOU DON'T THINK FIRST OF THIS 




AT THE 

QYM RESTAURANT 



JACK ROSE 



TED COCHINOS 



Op«n Late FRIDAY and SATURDAY night 
SUNDAY MORNING 




YOU'RE ON THE RIGHT TRACK IF YOU 
START AND END YOUR VACATION BY 
TAKING THE TRAIN! 



• DEPENDABLE 

• COMFORTABLE 

• ECONOMICAL 




•MlMUti H»H SIMICI' 



Don't let bad weather or last-minute 
cancellations gyp you out of part of your 
vacation. Play it smart; take the B ond M 
and be sure of getting home just when you 
want to and getting back in time for your 
first doss. Get the most out of every vaca- 
tion or week-end. Save money and go 
places by train, 

BOSTON andl MAINE 



Take It easy 



Take the train! 



auslc critic for the New York 
ISun , appeared in the Friday 
ImomlnK Issue of that paper, 

"What Robert Barrow's tenure 

las director of the Williams Olee 

■Club may be, I have no Idea, but 

Ithe work the young men did In 

iTown Hall last night suggests 

■that his option, if any, should be 

Irenewed indefinitely— at last, In 

■any case, till a larger number of 

|the local alumni appear than were 

present for this program. Barrow 

Itook the absent In his stride as he 

did the present in his confidence, 

verbally annotating the music be- 

Itore he conducted It. It made for 

. congenial as well as a rewarding 

ccaslon. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
types— as, for that matter, do 
(he human materials of which 
See TOWN, Page 3 



I Samoiloff Collection 
Oh DEpTay Xt inWT 

Throughout this week the 
Samolloa collection of scen- 
^^ery tmd costume designs is on 
i^dlsplay In the' shop of the AMT. 
[Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
[er's version of "Hamlet," OU- 
I ver Smith's sketches for "High 
[Button Shoes" and many other 
items of Interest to theatre 
fans. The exhibition wUl con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
[talk by the collector herself, 
[carlene SamoUotf. 




Price 10 cents 



« Honors 
ind Crown 



^Duo Downs— 
Thurher In Finals 



imjuig Hui e ^^u a uupuuiuj uiu w u 



the musicians 1^ this area thrilled 
Jazz lovers with an enthuslasyc 
performance at the secofid anniial 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles Illustrated— swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop— the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
LaiQson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, Instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
trombone, Norm Olson at the 
piano, Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And . 8wtaf 

The Dlxielanders were followed 
by a bc^ group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way. It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
"Gabardine and Sergey" Other 
performers in this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 
Harry Lewis, pianist Bill ParUng- 
ton, and drummer John Davis. 

A swing outfit made up mostly 
of Purple Knights' members took 
Bee JAZZ, Paige 8 



New Issue Of COMMENT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



o 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
issue of COMMENT indicates that 
the "new" magazine Is firmly es- 
tablished and will maintain its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative account of inter- 
service rivalries in the Pacific. 

If Professor Faison Intends to 
do to writing what be accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
an intellectual approach, he states' 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
J .I'jfrt.&eJJmely. theme of . '"Any-- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This issue of COMMENT is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
,EUid psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's Imagi- 
native and on the wljole convinc- 
ing problngs of a schizophrenic 
mind in "Journey Without End". 

Albert Oumey and Donald 
Froeb, freshmen, have written 
short stories of exceptional pro- 
mise. Qumey's "The Verge", one 
of the most impressive pieces in 
the issue, catches the quality of a 
small boy's observation with 



great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, is sensitive and well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work Is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
yeloEL _emotlonal, .tone. ''Twilight 
and White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic image, and too little lo the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic inood. "Sep- 
teittber Wind" is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle, ~ and J<dm 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a similiar comment. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard 



by ^ete Plckard 

in in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- - 
,nd doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
ifending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 
son and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
then the favorites turned on the steam 
1-3, 6-2. 

-O Billy Smith of Amherst copped 
the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with IJi points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and Ji. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner , and Schaaf breezed 
through "their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifinals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeilding 12-10, 7-5, Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up^wlth uncaiuiy gets, Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team, 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed -throughHifae stiff est fight -of 
the tournament in the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, '7-5, 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's 8m- 
Ith-Oreene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4, After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match, 

Robinson eased up against No- 

rris of Yale in the quarters and 

was forced into three sets. This 

n /• tired him somewhat for his semi- 

JT for* final meeting with Salaun, which 

*' See TENNIS, Page a 



Bors 

P|it the UC 

l^at con- 
tmtles last 

liie gentle- 
it^ He even 
iWlk-punch 
^t%he head 

l^eness to 

,t Aich con- 
raging, and 

|J_ 

low' 



)|||;ally call- 
1^1 run of 

>t ■ whatever 
^election is 
gHginal hu- 



ai; but most 
al is funny 
vlous taste. 
Uitle piece 
; tile issue" 
I tf^&int and 
i iftetch de- 
le bf life at 

tuti Notable 
*|rom RPI 
S^omantlc 

iV^- '^'^ 
nttice to refer 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



Dr. lister Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con's of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
ThetaDelta-Chi-he<ise-«n~ Monday 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
givIUg the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
Interest In human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine, Unfor- 
See JONES, ^ugt 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 



Members of tide WilUams Out- 
ing Club will Join the ttaculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at ll a.m., t^e group 
will entertain itself by^ playing 
Softball and competing in , some 
of the events of "woods" rikiU 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the 
group with a resthig period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the afternoon. 
See WOO, Page 3 




f tr« Biiti|p§ 



North Adams, MassochuMtls 



Willlon 



"Enterad <a second-class matter November 27, 19' 
North Adtams, Mossochusetts, under the Act of Moi 
Miller, Lomb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, 
Wednesday and Soturday during the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Holl, Williomstown, ' 

' Richords J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 

Norman S. Wood '50 ....'., — 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 ..' 

Wolter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. Blaschke, K. 

Editorial Stoff: 1951- E. Jones, 8. Perry, F. Relche 

1952- R. Duffield, G., Kinter, W. Moclay, H 

Widing. 

— Staff Photographer >^.,. v..,...^ii,...-..^„^„ ^ 

\, John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 

~>Edward L. Stackhouse '50 ... 

Rocry Frozier, III '51 

Douglos D. Garfield '50 A 

Barry 66nepe A 

John Luna"~x,. ..' 

W. Robert Mfl1<51 



Business Staff: 195d2..,B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C 
R. Moil, H. Voorhis. t«52- ^A. Bell, D. Bickfc 
S. Humes,, C. Noson, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith 



Volume LXUI 



MAY 11, 194g 



TYPING DONE 

Mg^ Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 



WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 



SABINS 



^" 



Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adorns 



ACdM»C 



WEDNESDAr 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 



THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Ray Millond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S . 
riMFTO EAT & THE PLACE. 
TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Nine 

The HlUt 
assault by 
during the 
venth limin 
nal run In 
single by I 
other singl( 
duced the 
in the sixtl 
Purple offer 
as twelve n 
to go with 1 
ballplayers 

This alter 
meet a po' 
Nine on We; 
who are lea 
have lost or 
Last year tt 
pie and Oei 
count. Ditm 
Bob Olsson 
ers in what 
Ephmen's t< 
the year. 
WilUams Un 

Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewsk 
Healy, ss 
Deliisser, 3b 
Owen, rf 
Pisljer, If 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R., ( 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 

Totals 



P«maui for our 
Italian Cooking 

The New 
Venice Girill 

27 STATE ST. PHONE 447 

LOUIS S. FARINON, Prep. 



The Haller Inn 



Mr, ond Mrs. Frank R. Thorns Jr. 




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chances of joining those "Most 
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Have Dad see your Author- 
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a Champion for your gradua- 
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Young man wif h geoif connections 

IN a Bell telephone central office, this Western 
Electric installer is connecting thousands 
of wires to new equipment to provide more 
and better service. 

He's one of 18,000 trained Western Electric 
installers who do this job for Bell Telephone 
companies. Crews are working in some 1,600 
central offices to connect new equipment 
which, like your telephone, is made by 
Western Electric. 

• Western Electric la part of the Bell System— haa been 
since 1882. This assures closest cooperation between 
people who design telephone equipment, people who 
nuJte it and people who operate it. Their teamwork haa 
given this country the best telephone service on eartli. 

Western Electric 

® 



A UNIT OF THE BELL 



SYSTEM SINCE 1tt2 



Trinity ^______ 

WUUams o^FWFWm 
For Trinity: Heppenstall 
Kunklewioz, For Williams: 



and 
Sut- 

toh, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man 
nlng. 



Cubs 



tor the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst Is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



mirmmi-tmi u muuy ui uun- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50i Roger Cor- 
win '52, Femald, and Llppincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 




PartyKjoersl 



.ilERE JS REAL HEWS- 




(Our lee Cream) is amazingly rich In butter fat ond 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try It and convince yourself 

Borden Ice Cream €o* 

North Adomt 2214 ' y^^ Deliver 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 



Badgn 
Jewtlry 

Stotieiteiy 
Club Pint 
Mcdoli 



Rings 
GifH 



Stain 
Favon 
Pragranu 

Traphiet' 



Write or Call 
CARL SORENSCN 

30 Murray Ave. Waterford, N. 
Telephone Waterford 644 



Y. 



COMPANY 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 

Courteous, efficient 
--~~^-_ and prompt v^l__^ 
repair' service " 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimb.ll Bids. Nortj. Adam.' 




T5R0F IN AT 



"THE INN" 

—--On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! InformiUlty is the rule 



In Shorts and Shirt slee^>es you are alu>ays mlcome far a drink or a bite to eat. 




acteristic. 

But he had been an office 1 onh' 
three months when he was ran 1 into 
the copy research departmcn .here 
he could put his liking for m^ t re- 
search to work. Not long afti'i iipw 
was made manager of copy t, ■ .irch: 
at j8, only seven years after 'm- had 
left Yale, he was vice-presidnit in 
charge of research and merchnn.lisinj. 

By bearing down on market siudies, 
he helped iroost the agency's liillings 
from $46 million in 1946(03 i'j.jSralc 
of more than $50 million. Last ■ ■ ifV '" 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion Haiy rw«s 
made president as Founder H ''■■ Mc- 
Cann, 68, moved up to boarc chair- 
man. Said an awed agency diri^ lor, in 
summarizing Harper's rise: "H ' enM- 
giiea people . . . he'i got so nnuh en- 
ergy himself. The agency h.is never 
had such good teamwork befou." 

On Harper's team is his wile Vir- 
ginia, whom he met while sin wm « 
clerical worker at the agency ami mar- 
ried in 1942. She is now assisi.int di- 
rector of McCann-Erickson's cop)' 
research department. Having no w"' 
*eiv,-Mr. *-Mr». H«rper*ome^es 

stay at the oflice until a a.m., wo*n« 
together. Says Mn. Harper: "1 ti""V. 
he's quite bright.' 

luccetiful aimot 
Harper r»aili TIMI 
•ach w»«k-<"» ** 
met* than I.SO"-^ 
other U.S. csllas* graduoterW 
find In TUMI Hm rt^^-'»»W '•"^ 
afford to mlM. ' -^ 







To enter fiut iubicripHen M 
WeeUr Newimafoiliie, See axr 
TtMl'S Repnteiitotlvei of Wim««" 
Collage - Mrry laiMpa, SigaM f^ 
Frataniity • CoHage Baek Star*- 




KW 



TEACHINO Restoration 
I iterature professor 
uses slides from the 
[1,'partment's fine col- 
li ction to illustrate 
is point. 






Price 10 cents 



les Honors 
nd Crown 



ihner DuoDowm 
Thurber In Finals 



ILLIAMS COLLEGE 

It is hide-bound to an ancient tradition of smallness 



ses 



Loud 
visors 

d,at the UC 

t that con- 

tlvities last 

gentls- 

He even 

-punch 

the head 

:eness to 



PHOTOGRAPHS FOR LIFE BY BOB KIMBERLY 



As spring comes to the Berkshires, 1097 Williams 
College students, according to the latest post-suspension 
estimates, are eagerly crawling to their early morning 
classes on the pretty little campus in Williamstown, 
Massachusetts, just as Williams students have tradition- 
ally crawled for hundreds of years. Traditionally, tiny 
Williams is a small college in an even smaller town, with 
a small student body and a small faculty, all enjoying 
the advantages of a small educational center, where 
knowledge is dispensed to small minds in small doses. 

The dying words of college founder, Colonel Eph- 



raim Williams, who was killed while heroically leading 
his men into ambush during the French and Indian War, 
were, "I want dis heah school what's got my 8000 clams 
to stay small and make big dough, dammit!" This last 
charge by "Uncle Eph," as he is affectionately knovra to 
this very day by Williams men, has been an inspira- 
tional guide to the college throughout the years. By 
failing or suspending students at the slightest provo- 
cation, Williams has remained small, and semi-profes- 
sional football teams have made the school rich beyond 
the Colonel's widest dreams. 



music critic for the New York 
•^un , appeared In the Friday 
morning Issue of that paper. 
"What Robert Barrow's tenure 
s director of the Williams Olee 
Club may be, I have no Idea, but 
!he work the young men did In 
I'uwn Hall last night suggests 
Uiat his option, If any, should be 
renewed Indefinitely— at last, In 
any case, till a larger number of 
ihe local alumni appear than were 
present tor this program. Barrow 
U>ok the absent in his stride as he 
did the present In his confidence, 
verbally annotating the music be- 
fore he conducted It. It made for 
»■ congenial as well as a rewarding 
occasion. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
to types— as, for that matter, do 
the human baterlals of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



$Amoiloff.CoU«iB$ioi^^ 

On Display^At AMT 

Throughoift' this week the 
SamollofT collection of scen- 
ery-lmd costume designs is on 
^splay In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included in this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's Version of "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of Interest to theatre 
'ans. The exhibition will con- 
clude 'Friday aftem'oon with a 
talk by the collector herself, 
Carlene SamoUoff. 



'•rtmywmg'wwtmim m u n puw i j uiu ii u 





the musicians In this area thrilled 
Jstzz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup'' 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles Illustrated—^ swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop— the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "Np^- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and fiie 
old Jazz favorite, "Muskrftt Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, Instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland jcthup Included Wally 
Olesep tfn trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
troifibone, Norm Olson at the 
piano. Bill Peyton playing banlo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
. Bop And 'Swing 

The Dlxlelanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched in between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
"Gabardine and Serge/' Other 
performers in this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 
Harry Lewis, planUt BlU ParUng- 
ton, and drummer John Davis. 

A swing putflt made up mostly 
of Purple Knights' members took 
8m jazz, Pace a 



New Issue Of COMMENT Features 
Fine Contributions By Under^ismen 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
Issue of COMMENT Indicates that 
the "new" magazine Is firmly ^ 
tablished and will malnUJrr Its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative wrltliig^on the Wil- 
liams campus. ^^ 

The lssi)r1eahs in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several Im- 
portant conclusions from 'a clear 
and informative account of Inter- 
service rivalries In the Pacific. 

If Professor Falson Intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably; Pleading for 
an intellectual approach, he states' 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
-.-r«-yet-tiie-tlmely theme «f ''Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This Issue of COMMEa^T Is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's Imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing probings' of a schizophrenic 
mind in "Journey Without End". 

Albert Oumey and Donald 
Froeb, fi-eshmen, have written 
short stories of exceptional pro- 
mise. Qumey's "The Verge", one 
of the most impressive pieces In 
the issue, catches the quality of a 
»m«U boy's ob^eivation with 



great skUJ^fYocb's "Batista," cha- 
ractep-S^tch of a Bermuda flsh- 
emian, Is sensitive and well-wrlt- 
Iten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the' smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop -ametional - tone' "Twilight 
and 'White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic linage, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems In a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember wmd" Is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle, and John 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a similiar comment. A fun- 
, See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof, 

Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



by pete Pickard 

lion in the Sage courts gallery Sunday af t- 
land doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
lefending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 
inson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
ts; then the favorites turned on the steam 
6-3, 6-2. ^ 

-O BlUy Smith of Amherst copped 
the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catUke Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
|. favored to win, but the Yalles 
MC/t were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
lu-day morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with IJi points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and H. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
^Jth the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifinals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeilding 12^10, 7-6. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeiatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro-" 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed through -the stiff est fight of 
the tournament in the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- . 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements,' but the mighty mites , 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-ff, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed In 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Page 2 




pcally call 
Ual run of 

» whatever 
^election is 
ql^ginal hu- 



ii, but most 
«1 is funny 
vlous taste. 
Uttle piece 
15 the issue" 
kjgualnt and 
fsk^l^ de- 
6f life at 



Notable 

romantic 
.sh. This 
!e tO' refer 



Dr. Lester Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con's of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta €lhi-lnrase on Monday" 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
Interest In human beings and a 
desire to help people'. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONX8, Page 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 

Membiare oFttie Wiiuams Out- 
ing Club will Join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 am., the group 
will entertain itself by playing 
Softball and competing In some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt. scheduled for the afternoon. 
Bee woe, Fi«e j 



f tre WUlti^^ 



North Adams, Massachusetts 



Wllliai 



"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 19 
North Adhms, Mossochusetts, under the Act of Mai>| 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, 
Wednesday and Saturday duririg the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williomstown, 

Richords J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 

Norman S. Wood '50 

Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 .■ 

Associote Editors: 1950- H. Boker, S. Bloschke, K, 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reichf 
1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, h 
Widing. 

Staff Photographer 

John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 

Horry Frozier, III '51 

Douglos D. Garfield '50 

Barry Benepe . 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 



Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Rregol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C 
, R. Moil, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickt( 
^^ S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Stkorovski, W. Smith, n 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Rood 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
\ ANY SIZE 

Cabins 

Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adams 



AtOMIC 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feoture: 7:00 - 9:00 

THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Roy Milland Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



Nine 




AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

TIME TO EAT & THE PLACE 

TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



The HlUtcl 
assault by 
during the 
venth innins 
nal run in l 
single by R 
other single 
duced the s 
in the sixU 
Purple offen 
as twelve mi 
to go with t 
ballplayers c 

This after 
meet a pov 
Nine on Wes 
who are lea^ 
have lost on 
Last year th 
pie and Geo 
count. Ditmi 
Bob Olsson £ 
ers in what 
Ephmen's to 
the year. 
Williams lln« 

Bvish, 2b ' 
Mierzejewskij 
Healy, ss 
DeLissei;, 3b 
Owen, rf- 
Pisher, If 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R, 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 



Totals 

Trinity 

Williams OBiTlOi 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewicz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



ENTERTAINING A PROFESSOR Charles Grimm, in their dormitory 
rooms before dinner, three students sit and chat while a 
fourth mixes cocktails under a canopy in the corner. 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR READING occupies a large part of most sin- 
dents' spare time. Intellectually minded students gather duly 
to inspect the latest displays of the College Book Stmr. 




Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears , to be 
strong. 



IN orwicn aiiu a gToup^ui^oBn,* 
mouth alumni. 

•Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Fernald, and Lippineolt 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



Smoked Roinbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 



•uri?r^ 



<5h 



I t ' 

I WILLIAMSTOVN 
[MAJlACHUSn 



Farty.Qoersl 

HERE IS REAL NEWS 




(Our Ice Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat and 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try it and convince yxirself 

Borden Ice Cream Co. 



North Adams 2214 



We Deliver 



L G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Badges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Stationery Progroms 

Club Pins Keys 

Medols Trophies 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Waterford, N. Y. 

Telephone Woterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 




Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adam. 




DROP IN AT 

"THE INN 



n 



On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! Informality is the rule 



In Shorts and Shirt sleeves you are always welcome for a drink or a bite to 



eat. 



acteristic. 

Hut hf had been an offK( 
three monlhs when he was n 
the copy research departnn 
he could put his liking for i 
searih to work. Not long all' 
wa.s made manager of co|)y 
at j.S, only seven years afii 
left Yale, he was vice-pn 
charge of research and men 1 
By bearing down on mark 
he helped boost the agenc > 
from $46 million in 1946 to ,1 
of more thTin $50 million. I.;i 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion II 
made president as Founder I 
Cann, 68, moved up to bo 
man. Said an awed agency cl' 
summarizing Harper's rise: 
gizcs people . . . he's got so 1 
ergy himself. The agency ! 
had such good teamwork b( 1 
On Harper's Icam is his 
ginja, whorri he met while ■•: 
clerical worker at the agency 
ried in 1942. She is now asM 
rector of i)[cC»nn-Ericks(in 
research dcpaHment. Havini; no ( 
dren, Mr. & Mrs. Harper someliir"'' 
stay at the office unti) 3 a.m.. work'"! 
together. Say* Mrs. Hirpcr I tl""" 
he's quite bright. 

Succ*»ful odnn" 
Harpar r»ads HM' 
•ach w»»l<-" *' 

^ . mor* thon 1,500,000 

elhar U.S. cellag* gradupte* «^ 
«nd In TIMI Hi* n«wt «*•)' «•"' 
offord to mlu. 

• <• enter your subicrlpHon I* 
WMkly N.wim«g«tll*>-S" •"? ' 
TjMI'S R.pr.»nl.fi^« «» WIIH.*| 
Collets J Barry B*Mp«> $'<■"* 
Fnittmlty - Colltf* Book Storti. 



only 

linlo 

vherr 

.1 rt- 

i.irjHT 

, .irch 

u- had 

(lit in 

• [lising. 

I udifs. 

'illinit! 

.(Sralr 

icpkin 

.(■rwa.* 

:<.M.- 

chair- 

tor, in 

: ener- 

.iifhfn-' 

> never 

ife Vir- 
■ was a 
lid mar- 
i.-intdi- 
copy 
chil- 





A WILLIAMS MAN sees a lot of his campus dur- 
ing four years. Because he is isolated, he is apt 
to participate in more sports, and college func- 
tions than his city coiniterpart. On Saturday 
afternoon, cars seldom pass the intersection 
leading to Bennington College and New York. 



Social Life 

Isolation forces a vice- 
free existence for most 
Williams Undergrads 



A visitor to Williams 146 years ago W)- 
served that the "situation of the college is a 
decent, thriving coiuitry town," where there 
are "comparatively few temptations to dissipa- 
tion and vice." 146 years later, the situation has 
changed very little. Because Williams is located 
in an inaccessible mountain hamlet, an(\ because 
the average Williams student can take onlv 
slightly more than three or four chapel cuts 
a term, most undergraduates are content to 
remain in Williamstown, and to amuse them- 
selves 1)V participating in sports and college 
functions. 

During most of the vear, college life is 
<]uiet and orderlw Most nights, when there is 
normallv notliing to do. a student participates 
in a card gauic. drinking bout. riot, or otlier 
nnid activitv. 

On rare date niglits, Williams men settle 
for small, homey parties with chaste girls from 
nearby Bennington (College during the short 
period when it is in session. .\t other times, 
nearby carnival shows offer outlets for e.xhn- 
beranf boyish spirits. Naturally, pent up emo- 
tions seem to prefer "girlv shows" over ferris 
wheels and merrv-go-rounds. Minii and Peggy 
O'Dav, stars of the "Parisienne Follies." were the 
centers of attraction at a recent carnival in 
Beiniington. 

Onlv (luring rare occasions. Winter Clarni- 
val. spring and fall houseparties. class dances, 
pre-and post-vacation celebiations. play week- 
ends, and Saturday Morning Breakfast (^lub 
meetings do nuderyradnates los(* some of their 
inherent decornm. The\' theji revert to the tradi- 
tions of the '2{)s. when Williams men were 
known as gay young blades who carried flasks 
and drove Stutz Bearcats. 



WYOMING-BORN Peggy O'Day. featured danseuse in the Benn- 
ington Carnival, is the favorite of thrill-hungry back-room boys. 




^■:v^f^'] 




Price 10 cents 



es Honors 
and Crown 



ribner Duo Downs 
5 Thurber In Finals 



FAVORITE AFTER-DINNER PASTIME is a leisurely game of cards in plush cardroom. 
This is the St. .■\nthony lounge, but scene is repeated throughout the campus. 



1 music critic for the New York 

I Sun , appeared In the Friday 

morning Issue of that paper. 

"What Robert Barrow's tenure 

director of the Williams Glee 

[ Club may be, I have no Idea, but 

' the work the young men did In 

i Town Hall last night suggests 

I that his option, If any, should be 

renewed Indefinitely— at last, In 

any case, till a larger number of 

the local alumni appear than were 

[present for this program. Barrow 

I took the absent in his stride as he 

I did the present In his confidence, 

[verbally annotating the music be- 

Ifore he conducted It. It made for 

la congenial as well as a rewarding 

I occasion. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
Ito types — as, for that matter, do 
|the human materials of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



Samoiloff Collection 

On Display At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
SamoilofI collection of seen- 
ery and costume designs is on 
dlsnbuy In the shop of the AMT. 
Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of. "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 

, Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of Interest to theatre 

I fans. THfe exhibition will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 

! talk by the collector herself, 

I Carlene SamoUoa. 

,^, . . 



- - 1 iaj > » IB ww lvi y^W'- w im m hy u<vwu 

the musicians In this area thrilled 
Jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at thp second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles illustrated — swing, 
Nat "King " Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop — the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson of> 
clarinet, instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Neil Bolens on 
trombone. Norm Olson at the 
piano, BUI Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And Swing 

The Dlxielanderswere followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Fob" and 
"Qabardlne and Serge/' Other 
performers In this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 




New Issue Of COMMt:NT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



cha- 



great skill. Proeb's "Bati-sta,' 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 



is sensitive and well-writ- 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
issue of COMMENT indicates that erman, 
the "new" magazine is firmly es- ten. 

tablished and will maintain its i "The Shadowy Place." Robert 
high .artistic level, printing the Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
only creative writing on the Wll- 1 arrival at an understanding of 
Hams campus. I f vil, contains the smoothest prose 

The issue leans in the direction in the magazine. Characteriza- 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- ' tlons of Marco and the youth of 



al, but most 

al is funny 

rious taste. 

•^ little piece 

the issue" 

quaint and 

, . sketch de- 

'■'Wle of life al 

i 
ns. Notable 
n from RPI 
3t romantic 
Nash. This 
BAiuo uau >/«ua<nu u uiiiincc to refer 
to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a similiar comment. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



tides are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative account of Inter- 
service rivalries in the Pacific. 

If Professor Paison intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
an Intellectual approach, he states 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
. . " yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
Is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This Issue of COMMENT is tor 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's Imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing problngs of a schizophrenic 
mind In "Journey 'Without End". 

Albert Oumey and Donald 



Froeb, freshmen, have written 
Harry Lewis, pianist Bill Parting- ' short stories of exceptional pro- 
ton and drummer John Davis. Imlse. Qumey's "The Verge", one 
A swing outfit made up mostly of the most Impressive pieces In 
of Purple Knights' members took the Issue, catches the quaUty ot a 
&ee JAZZ, Page 2 " '" "■""" """ """■ 



small boy's observation with 



the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style In a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop emotional tone. "Twilight 
and 'White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic image, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Pe^er Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" is concise ahd care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
malns^lgh throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle, and John 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof, 

Dr Jones TelU Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



by Pete Fickard 

Ion in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 
gland doubles finals began, for It was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 
iblnson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
sets; then the favorites turned on the steam 
6-3, 6-2. 

o Billy Smith of Amherst copped 

the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun In four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalies 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with 1)2 points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and ii. 
Doubles Teams Potent 

Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifmals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yellding 12-10, 7-5. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinso^ and Thurber struggl- 
ed throuRh the stiffest fight of 
the tournament in the quarter^ 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed In 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 

Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Page 2 



ises 
duct 

o Leuil 
visurs 



d at the UC 

t that con- 

. Jilvlties last 

be gentle- 
yp. He even 
milk-punch 
,t the head 

likeness to 

t such con- 
raging, and 



light 

'Cow' 



stically call- 
sual run of 

)f whatever 
selection is 
jrlginal hu- 



Dr. Xjcster Jones, Williams '13. 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the prols and 
cdn's of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi Bouse on Monday 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons t^at 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because It Is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest in human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONES, Page 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock t^xcursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 

Meinbers of the Williams Out-- 
ing Club will join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m., the group 
will entertain Itself by playing 
Softball and competing in some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe meinbers participated 
In at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the.. 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt ^heduled for the altemoo*. 
,,,..- X,8e^wbc, Page 2 



.*. 



Nor th Adorns, Mossochus etts Wlllior 

"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 19 
North Adbms, Mossochusetts, under the Act of Mo 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adorns, 
Wednesday and Saturday durii^g^the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Willlomstown, 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or U = 

■ Herbert D. Mohring '50 ., 

Norman S. Wood '50 : 

> Philip S. Collins '50 (Phone: 981 -M or 33) ..., 

U Lonsino G. Scofield '50 .'■• 

o Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors; 1950- H. Baker, S. Bloschke, K. 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Relchi 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, \ 

Widih^. 

-- , — Staff Photogropher -. 



<Y*h' %'. 



John S. Prescott, Jr, '50 .. 
Edward L. Stockhouse '50 

Horry Frailer, III '51 

Pouglas D. Garfield '50 ... 

Barry Benepe 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 



A 



Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Riegal, J. K. Whitney. 1951 - P. Avery,..C 
R. Moil, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickfi 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



, TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SABINS 

,Cor. Holden b Center Sts. 
North Adams 



ACdMlC 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 



THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Roy Miliond Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 






^:-% 



^'M 



■ tij 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S . 
riME TO EAT & THE PLACE 
TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Niue 

The HUlt 
assault by 
during the 
venth innln 
nal run in 
single by 1 
other single 
duced the j 
in the sixtl 
Purple offen 
as twelve ni 
to go with i 
ballplayers \ 

This afteij 
meet a po^ 
Nine on We4 
who are leaj 
have lost 
Last year 
pie and Oe<j 
count. Ditmi 
Bob Olsson \ 
ers in what! 
Ephmen's td 
the year. 
Williams lln 

Bush, 2b 
Mlerzejewskl 
Healy, ss 
DeLisser, 3b 
Owen, rf 
Fisljer, If 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R. 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Bay % 
Zeller, c ' 
Manning f 
Sutton, p \ 
Lanes, p I 
Ditmar r 
Ray, p S 

Totals I 



Trinity |. 

Williams OOO 101 ADO 3 8 3 
For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewioz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 






..,.,, %■ --,.-■ 



.?ftr^,.t 



j^x-'-'^ 



mm\mm 



fmM^ 



r^ '^^' 



.^^J-*te 






<«SS5»*' 



CAMPUS 



Its elm-lined streets 



are lovely in the springs 



Architecturally perfect, the campus of 
Williams College lies beneath the stately, 
Dutch Elm-blighted shade trees of Wil- 
liamstown. Combining Georgian, Colonial 
Georgian, Neo-Gothic, Victorian, and Ala- 
mo-style buildings, Williams presents a 
vast panorama of architecture through the 
ages in a small, artistically integrated area. 

Chapin Hall, which houses the Air 
ROTC unit, is a perfect copy of a Georgian 
building. Built at a cost of $750,000, it 
contains no nails. The new Faculty Club, 
often mistaken for a gas station by passing 
motorists, is a perfect copy of a gas station. 

Graceful fraternity houses line Main 
Street, a scenic thoroughfare which pro- 
vides an ideal speedway for after-dinner 
outings of the Chi Psi Midget Motorcycle 



Club - . 

Spring Street, the center of the ti 
bustling commercial interests, lias beei 
called one of the most attractive sin 
streets in America. Visitors come 
far as North Pownal to see tin 
k: o:ty pi'ie panelled facade of tli 
of Walsh, a country clothing <i 
featuring New York prices. 

For those who want bank^ 
Street has banks. 

The Williams student nevci 
gazing at the glorious hills sm 
his school, and after four years 
between classes, his fraternity h 
the post office, he becomes intii 
quainted with the area. After ' 
uates he never forgets the camp' 
elm-lined streets of the town. 



all town 
from i 
rustk, 
!■ Housi 
iiporiiii 

SprJ"! 

tires ( 
oundinj 
■I hikini 
use, 
itely af 
le C^ll^ 

and tin 



Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Pemald, and Upplncott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



l UU I U l HU^ ^MgTtgqtT" 



Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 





PartylQoersl 



MERL-IS -REALJ4EWS 



(Our Ice Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat and 
»-<3 Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious t&the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try it and convince yourself 

BordlBii Ice Cream Co. 



North Adams 2214 



We Deliver 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Badges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Stoliertery Programs 

Club Pins Keys 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Coll 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Woterford, N. Y. 

Telephone Woterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

ond prompt 

repair service 



Frank Proveneher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adam* 





pRO|t IN AT 

"THE INN" 

On your way back from tennis 
for that lonjg, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! Infortftality is the rule 



In Shorts and Shirt sleeves you are always welcome for a dritik or a bite to eat. 



nly 
nto 
.ere 

^^ 
per 
ch: 
had 

in 
ing. 



rale 

•kin- 

was 

Mc- 

hair- 

,r,in 

ner- 

1 en- 



I acteristic! 

But he had been an oflSce bo. 
three months when he was mov( 
the copy research department 
he could put his liking for mark 
search to work. Not long after. 1 ! 
was made manager of copy rcsi 
at 28, only seven years after h' 
left Yale, he was vice-presidi 
charge of research and merchani! 

By bearing down on market si idies, 
he helped boost the agency's biliings 
from $46 million in 1946 to a 194 
of more than $50 million. Last v 1 
Manhattan, at 3J, Marion Harpr 
made president as Founder H. K 
Cann, 68, moved up to board ' 
man. Said an awed agency direri 
summarizing Harper's rise: "He 
gizes people . . . he's got so mu< 
ergy himself. The agency has never 
had such good teamwork before " 

On Harper's team^jj his wif( Vir- 
ginja, whom he met fhile she was a 
clerical worker at the agency and mar- 
ried in 1942. She is now assistant di- 
rector of ^^cC»nn-Erick8on's copy 
research department. Having no cM- 
dfen;Mr: & Mrs. Hinrperwimctimes 
stay at the office until a a.m., working 
together. Says Mrs. Harper: "1 think 
he's quiU bright." 

Suecaiiful adman 
Horpar raads TiMt 
•ach W»»k-a» i» 
man than l,590,fl« 
Mh«r U.S. collofl* graduates who 
And In TUMI Ih* mw( fk*r «■"'' 
afford to miM. 

To enter your subscripHon te TM 
Weakly NawsmagaxiiM, See any of 
TIME'S Repnsantotlras at WHIM"" 
Collogo - lorry kenope, SigiM '**' 
Fraternity - CoHago look Store. 
-;__M-_- — -at,^ ■ — -** 




FRATERNITIES play an 

impbrtant part in col- 
lege life. A candidate 
learns fraternity secrets 
in tunnel to St. An- 
thony goat room be- 
neath nearby Zeta Psi 
house. Robes are used 
only as decorations. 



:S^. 




,'^;p?^yr^.^.'. 




Price 10 cents 




REMOVING DEBRIS from 
the Sigma Phi roof after 
houjeparties is one of 
the jobs normally rele- 
gated to freshman 
pledges. 



s Honors 
md Crown 



ibner Dtio Downs 
Thurber In Finals 



STATELY ELMS line Laboratory Cam- 
pus. Jesup Hall (left) is site of most 
undergraduate extra-curricular ac- 
ii\ities. Behind comer windows 
work alert editors of the RECORD, 
lamed college newspaper.' Parking 
li»l behind Jesup is for faculty mem- 
l» IS only. 



TAPPING FOR GARGOYLE, highly respected 
campus honor society, is held annually on 
Memorial Day. Junior BMOC's John Griggs 
and Andrew Heineman arrive early for 
this year's eagerly awaited ceremony. Sen- 
ior on left failed to make it last year but 
has not yet given up hope. 




ises 
"iduct 



.'•O Lead 
IVisors 

iftat the UC 
t that con- 
Uvitles last 
be gentle- 
st- He even 
aUk-punch 
li the head 
vllkeness to 

t' such con- 
raging, and 



music critic for the New York 
"^un , appeared In the Friday 
nomlng issue of that paper. 
"What Robert Barrow's tenure 
director of the Williams Qlee 
' lub may be, I have no idea, but 
lie work the young men did In 
lawn HaU last night suggests 
itiat his option. If any, should be 
renewed Indefinitely— at last, In 
iny case, till a larger number of 
the local alumni appear than were 
uresent for this program. Barrow 
took the absent In his stride as he 
(lid the present In his confidence, 
verbally annotating the music be- 
fore he conducted It. It made for 
.1 congenial as well as a rewarding 
occasion. 

College glee dubs tend to run 
to types— as, for that matter, do 
the human materlajs of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



Samoiloff Collection 

On Display At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
Samoiloff collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs is on 
display In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included In this coUectlon are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of Interest to theatre 
fans. The exhibition will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
talk by the collector herself, 
Carlene SamoUoff. 



1 imftrnvmrntn^^mrmmprnmrn^mmmmm 
the musicians In this area thrilled 
Jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles Illustrated — swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop — the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old Jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, mstrumentalists In the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Helens on 
trombone, Norm Olson at the 
piano. Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
JBop And Swing 
The Dlxlelanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched in between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
■Gabardine and Sergej" Other 
performers in this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 
Harry Lewis, pianist Bill Parting- 
ton, and drumpier John Davis- 

A swtag outfit made up mostly 
of Purple Knights' members took 
Bee JAZZ, Page 3 



New Issue Of COMMEJN 1" Features " 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
issue of COMMENT Indicates that 
the, "new" magazine is firmly es- 
tablished and will maintain its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The Issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
apd Informative account of inter- 
service rivalries in the Pacific. 

If Professor Faison intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
an Intellectual approach, he #ate3 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
Is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This issue of COMMENT is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets off to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's Imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing problngs of a schizophrenic 
mind in "Journey Without End". 

Albert Oumey and Donald 
Froeb, freshmen, hav? written 
short stories of exceptional pro- 
Imlse. Oumey's "The Verge", one 
of the most impressive pieces in 
the issue, catches the quality of a 
small boy's obseWatlM with 



great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, is sensitive and well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work is 
Russell BoiiVne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de> 
velop enfdUonai tone. "Twilight 
and White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic image, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able tw)at to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, WlUlam Tuttle, and John 
Field have -all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions in a variety 
of styles. 



to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" Is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a simlllar comment. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof. 



by Pete Pickard 

i»ion in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 
ijland doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 
^Inson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
*ets; then the favorites turned on the steam 
7; 6-3, 6-2. 

■T O BiUy Smith of Amherst copped 

the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with la points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and )i. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner and, Schaat breezed 
through their fii^t three matches 
with the loss of ohly eleven games 
but ill the semifinals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeildlng 12-10, 7-8. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs ooncentk;ated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with -uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually \ pro- 
ved the margin of victory foi^^the 
home team. \ 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed through-the stiffest fight of 
the tournament in the quarter^\ 
finals against Monsalvatge and \ 
MUler of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were Invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed In 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
Ith-Qreene duo, which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bbwing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he buUt up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENms, Page 3 




lically call- 
ual run of 

whatever 
"{^election is 
qriginal hu- 



ai, but most 
al is funny 
vious taste, 
little piece 
; the issue" 
I quaint and 
> sketch de- 
1 of life at 



lis. Notable 
n'lrom RPI 
8t(j;romantlc 
il||Bh. This 
.lulice to refer 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



Dr. Ijester Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con's of the medical professioi^ as 
a_CMeerJn^a lectoejiyen a^^^ 



Theta Delta Chi house on Monday 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest In human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see tjie many manifestations of 
sciisnce in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONES, Page 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 



Members of the Williams Out- 
ing Club will Join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m., the group 
wlU entertain itself by playing 
Softball and competing in some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the 
gToup» with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the aftwnoon 
See WOO, Pace 3 




Nort h Adoms, Mossochusetl s W^Utii 

"Entered as second-closs matter Novennbej,iil7, 19 
North Adbms, Massochusetts, under the Act of Mo 
Miller, Lamb ond Hunter, Inc.j,, North Adams, 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year, 
per year. Record Ofticej, Jesup Hall, WiHiamstoi^ 




Richords J. Hetler, Jr. '50 (Phone 

Herbert p,'Mohring '50 

Nornjon S, Wood '50 

Philip S. Collins 'So (Phone: 9M'-M or 33) 

'^Lansing G, Scofield '50 ..^.'^ 

Walter P. Stern '50 . '' 

William R, Barney '49 

Associote Editors :,,V950 



or n: 



Editoriol Stgff: 1951- E. 

1952- R, Duftield, 

Widing, 
Staff Photographer ■ 



H. Baker, S. Bloschke, 

Jones, B, Perry, F, Reich)|, 
G. Kinter, W. Maclay, 



John S, Prescott, Jr. '50 , 
Edward L. Stockhouse '50 
Horry Frazier, III '51 
Douglas D, Garfield '50 .. 
Borry Benepe * 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 



Business Stoff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. C 
W. Riegol, J, K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C. 
R: Moi], H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickfo 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, * 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SARINS 

Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adams 




j><^;?7Tw»4W;*iFi«n!r^^'T'??r^^ -i^ 




THOUGH PROUD of clm-shailid traditions, natiiotic Willi; 
face tlu- future steadfa.stly. -A" air HOTC cailft adniii. 
experimental fighter plane, dreams of day when he will 
country's airmen. 



i.s men 
latest 
fill his 

II 



fxtm^ 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 

THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Roy Miliand Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

riME TO EAT & THE PLACE 

TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Nine 

The HUltCi 
assault by 
during the.; 
verith inning; 
nal run in 1' 
single by B 
other single 
duced the t 
in the sixt 
Purple oSEen; 
as twelve no- 
to go with t 
ballplayers ( 

This after 
meet a po\ 
Nine on Wea 
who are lea 
have lost on 
Last year th 
pie and Geo 
count. Ditmi 
Bob Olsson t 
ers in what 
Ephmen's tc 
the year, 
Williams Uni 



Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewskl 
Healy, ss 
DeLlsser, 3b 
Owen, rf 
Fisljer, If 
Tone 

Lynch ' 

Mason, R,. ot 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar . 

Ray, p 

Totals 



Trinity 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewicz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton. Lanes. Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning, 



PROFESSORS occasionally hold informal classes in their owii 
homes. Members of a modern poetry class meet with J. C. Hunt 
over Pluto Water and pretzels to read poems, try to guess authors. 





UNCROWDED LIBRARY i.s one advantage of a college like Wil- 
liams. Study rooms provide a peaceful atmosphere allowing 
students to take full advantage of facilities. 



NO STORY III Williams would be complete will it 1 

picture ol plush restroom facilities at Weston [•'id w(ni 

oiilv after sigorous Record editorial campaign -nli' 

plated fixtures were made possible bv college's fii neiiil 
siir|)liis. 



Cubs 



for the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



TTorwicIi ^riS" a" group of Dart- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Fernald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U, of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street Ir^^tHuJrTr*', 





Party. Qoers! 



HERE IS REAL NEWS 

>. 



(Our Ice Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat and 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal time) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try it and convince yourself 

Borden lee Cream Co. 



North Adorns 2214 



We Deliver 



L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Badges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Stotionery Programs 

Club Pins Keys 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Call 

CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave, Woterford, N. Y, 

Telephone Woterford 644 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



COMPANY 




Fronk Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adomi 




DROP IN AT 

"THE INN"' 

On your way hack from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 



REMEMBER! 



Informality is the rule 



In Shorts and Shirt sleeves you are always welcome for a drink or a b 



ite to eat. 



acteristic, 

Hul he tiad been an office boy c V 
tliri'c months when he was moved ) n 
the copy rese;irch dt^artmcnt v/h i* 
he could put his liking for marliel • 
search to work. Not long after. Hai r 
waslriade manager of copy reseai 
at 2S, only seven years after he : I 
left Yale, he was vice-president 11 
charge of research and merchandi^i .;. 

Uy bearing down on market studi -. 
he helped boost the agency's .bill'' -^ 
from li!46 million in 19461!) a 1(148 r.i c 
of more than $50 million. Last week n 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion Harper v < 
made president as Founder H, K, ^! ■ 
Cann, 68. moved up to board cha)- 
man. Said an awed agency director n 
summarizing Harper's rise: "He em 1- 
gizes people . , , he's got so much ( n- 
ergy himself. The agency has ncM r 
had such good teamwork before," 

On Harjier's team is his wife \ ir- 
ginja, whom he met while she was a 
clerical worker at the agency and mar- 
ried in 1942, She is now assistant >li- 
rector of McCann-Erickson's copy 
research department. Having no chil- 
dren, Mr, & Mrs. Harper sometimes 
stay at the office until j a.m., working 
together. Says Mrs, Harper: "I think 
he's quite bright," 

Succaiiful odmon 
Harpar rcadi TIME 
•Qch w»»k— a« d* 
mora than 1,500,000 
elhar U.S. cellar* graduatat who 
And In TIME th* nowt lh»Y «>"'' 
afford to mlu. ^ 

To tntor your iMbtcripHeit H ■** 
Wookly NowimogoiiiM, $«• any °' 
TIME'S RapraMntotiva» at WlHienn 
Cellag* -Barry Banapa, Sigma fM 
Frotarnlfy • Cellaga Baak Stora. 




y^ 



■A' mm 



_^~' 






':p^% 



i-\ 






AT THE FIRST SOUND 

OF TROUBLE 

Stop in and see ut 

BACOJV'S OARACE 

WILLIAMSTOWN PHONE 420 



T'Shirts 




... jtfipuipipiip 



Jackets 



Slacks 



It's Cuttings in North Adams 



for fine Sportstix'ar! 



For at Cutting's you will find all sorts of smartly 
casual, nationally advertised sportswear from such makers 
as Mc-Cregor, Botany, Arrow at jirices that make a trip 
to Cutting's well worth your while. 



C* H* Cutting & Co. 



NORTH ADAMS 



CONTRIBUTIONS from successful alumni are a constant source of 
revenue to the college, already suffering from an excess of funds. 

Williams College has 
to stretch to keep its 
ends from meeting. 

By modern business standards, Williams is out of this world. 
Many a corporation president would give anything to find him- 
self in the shoes of James Phinney Baxter, 3rd, the president of 
Williams. 

The problem that confronts Baxter would seem strange to 
the average businessman. Baxter is trying desperately to lose 
money and keej) the college the way it is and avoid tremendous 
profits which seem almost inevitable. Williams is inefficient by 
design, not by accident, as any undergraduate can tell you. It 
strives for small, dull classes, few female students, and no con- 
tact with the outside world. 

Williams now makes^about $1834 on each student each term 
of the college year. Each student pays tuition, board and room, 
and dozens of small but annoying fees, for everything from 
sticking pins in the wall to signing up for the wrong courses. In 
return he gets an education which costs the college about $57. .35. 
Ten years ago this cost the college up to $200, but overcrowding 
the dormitories and stepping up the fees has increased the al- 
ready swollen profits to enormous figures. 

Williams has to stretch to keep the ends from meeting. 
".Sometimes the .shirt," says Baxter, "Gets pretty far from the 
pants. " Such ca.ses usually result in a year's suspension for the 
offender. 

The independent college benefits from high tuition and low 
costs, whereas a state university like the University of California 

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 

15 



Price 10 cents 



es Honors 



and Crown 



ribner Duo Downs 
I9 Thurber In Finals 



11 c critic for the New York 
P . appeared In the Friday 
t: ning Issue of that paper. 

■\liat Robert Barrows tenure 
a luector of the Williams Glee 
C J may be, I have no Idea, but 
t: work the young men did In 
1 II Hall last night suggests 
1 his option. If any, should be 
1 wed Indefinitely— at last, In 
i' case, tin ft larger number of 
I local alumni appear than were 
I <'nt for this program. Bftwow 
' the absent In his stride as he 
ti; ihe present In his confidence. 
» iiUy annotating the music be- 
I' ' he conducted It. It made for 
1 • >ngenlal as well as a rewarding 
Of' aslon. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
Uj i.vpes— as. for that matter, do 
H»' human materials of which 
See TOWN, Page 2 



Suinoiloflf Collection 

On Display At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
Samolloft collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs Is bn 
display In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald benslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet." Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
Items of Interest to theatre 
fans. The exhibition will con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
'»llt by the collector herself, 
Cariene SamoUoff. 



the musicians In this area thrilled 
Jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Je,sup' 
concei'l Saturday night. Of the 
four .styles Illustrated— swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop — the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, Instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland srouP included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet, Nell Bolens on 
trombone, Norm Olson at the 
piano. Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And Swing 

The Dlxlelanders yiere followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
"Gabardine and Serge/' Other 
performers in this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 



New Issue Of COMMEINT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmen 



by P. Sheridan Collins great skill. Ft'oeb's "Batista. " cha- 

The appearance of the third racte'r sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
issue of COMMENT indicates that erman. is sensitive and well-writ- 
the "new" magazine is firmly es- ten. 



tablished and will maintain its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The Issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several Im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative account of Inter- 
servlce rivalries In the Pacific. 

If Professor Faison Intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art. he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
an intellectual approach, he spates 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
. . " yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
Is obscured by his atomic prose. 



"The Shadowy Place." Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work Is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop emotional tone. "Twilight 
and White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the, 
basic image, and too little to the 



This Issue of COMMENT Is for , 
adults xiply. A parade of neuroses concrete from which it arises, 
and psychoses gets oft to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing probings of a schizophrenic 
mind In "Journey Without End". 

Albert Gumey and Donald 
Froeb, freshmen, have written 



Harrv Lewis pianist Bill Parting- ' short stories of exceptional pro. 
ton and drummer John Davis. \ mlse. Gurney's "The Verge", one 
A swing outfit made up mostly of the most impressive Pieces In 
of Purple KnlghU' members took 'he 'f-'lf '1 "T.^ *" 1.' 



Bee JAZZ, Page 2 



small boy'a observation with 



Peter Andrews has wrlttenstwo 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" Is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle, and John 
J'ield have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions In a variety 
ol styles. 



ns. Notable 
31 from RPI 
St romantic 
Nash. This 
......> ».v w.u.~.» » ^..»nce to refer 

to the "Pup" as "pleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a similiar comment. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard Prof, 



by Pete Pickard 

islon in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 

igland doubles finals began, for it was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 

)binson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
sets; then the favorites turned on the steaijj 

7, 6-3, 6-2. 

O Billy Smith of Amherst capped 

the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday monilng and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with Iji points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and ii. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the semifmals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeilding 12-10, 7-5. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed throufjh the stiffest fight of 
the tournament in the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady in the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3. 6-8, 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo. which twice for- 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6, 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully, Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3. he built up a 3-1 lead In 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 
tired him somewhat for his semi- 
final meeting with Salaun, which 
See TENNIS, Page 2 



ises 
tduct 

o Lrud 
Ivisurs 

d at the UC 
t that con- 
tivities last 

be gentle- 
It. He even 
milk-punch 
,t the head 

likeness to 

,t such con- 
raging, and 
s 2 

ilight 
'Cow' 



Jtlcally call- 
sual run of 

jf whatever 
selection is 
original hu- 



al, but most 
al is funny 
vlous taste. 
little piece 
, the issue" 
I quaint and 
; sketch de- 
le of life ai 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



Dr. Lester Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the pro's and 
con's of the medical profession as 
a career in a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi house on Monday 
night. 

,. -Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest In human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. XJnfor. 
See JONES, Page 4 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnie For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Afternoon 



Members of the Williams Out- 
ing Club will join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt. Greylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m.. tKe group 
win entertain Itself by playing 
Softball and competing in some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which woe members participated 
in at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hamburgers 
as its main dish will provide the 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the beginning of a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the afternoon. 
See woe. Page ^ 




f tr^ 'BUiy^^ 




North Adorns, MossochuseH s 



Willior 



"Entered os second-class matter November 27, 19' 
North Adbms, Massachusetts, urider the Act of Mai 
Miller, Lamb and Hunter, inc.. North Adams, / 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college year, 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williamstown, 

Richards J. Heuer, Jr. '50 (Phone: 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '50 ., 

Norman S. Wood '50 ^,.; 

Philip S. Collins '50 (PhorJe\ 981 -M or 33) 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, S. BIqschke, K 

Editoriol Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Perry, F. Reich< 
1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. Mocloy, I- 
Widing. 

Staff Photographer 




John S. Prescott. Jr. '50 /. 
Edward L. ^StockhOuse '50 



Horry Frazier, 111 '51. ' 

Douglas D. Gorfield '50 A: 

Barry Benepe A 

John Lund ' 

if- W. Robert Mill '51 



Business Staff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. (! 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, Ci' 
R. Moil-, H. Voorhis. f952- A. Bell, D. Bickfdr- 
S. Humes, C. Noson, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, V 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SARINS 

Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adorns 



AtdNIC 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feoture: 7:00 - 9:00 

THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Roy Milland Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAL 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

7^^^E TO EAT & THE PLACE 

TO EAT IS THE 



RICHMOND 
GRILL 



Nine- 

The Hilltc 
assault by 
during the 
venth Inning 
nal run in 'i 
single by R 
other single, 
duced the si 
in the sixtlj 
Purple often j 
as twelve m| 
to go with t 
ballplayers c 

This after 
meet a poi 
Nine on We^ 
who are lea 
have lost on 
Last year th 
pie and Geo 
count. Ditmi 
Bob Olsson s 
ers in what 
Ephmen's to 
the year. 
WilliSms lint 

Bush, 2b 
Mierzejewsktf 
Healy, ss | 
DeLlsser, 3b i 
Owen, rf 
Fisljer, If 
Tone ? 

Lynch f 

Mason, R., cl 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar ■ 

Ray, p i 

t 

Totals i 

Trinity '.. 

Williams 000 101 000 2 8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunkiewioz, For Williams: Sut- 
ton, Lanes, Ray and Zeller, Man- 
ning. 



NO! 




We don't patch your tires 
with bubble gum. 




And we don't pound dents 
into your fenders. 




But we do guarantee to 
do a good job repairing your 
car from A to Z. 

Motor repairs will keep 
your car running smoothly, 
and body work will keep 
your car from rattling down 
Billville's wide Boulevards. 



GRUNDY'S 
GARAGE 

Authorixed Pontiac Dealer 



Water St. 



Tel. 5 



TT 



WILLIAMSCONTINUIO 

has to scrape along on the taxpayer's dollars. Williams gets 
money from five sources; alumni, seniors, juniors, sophomores, 
and freshmen. Before the war, with a student body of only 850, 
the college managed to break even. Now, with 1150 students, 
Baxter doesn't know what to do with all the money which pours 
in. Salary cuts have reduced operating costs to dangerously 
low figures. 

This excess of money brings about another serious problem. 
Wilhams attracts professors from other schools and colleges. In 
the past year educators have come to Williams from 117 other 
high schools. "The more great teachers we have, the more al- 
umni donate to the Fund Drive and the more dough we have 
to store away. Look at Prof. Schuman and the way the funds 
come to us I What can we do?" 

In an attempt to keep the better men away, Baxter main- 
tains faculty salaries below the minimum-wage and pays all 
employees less than they are worth. 

Williams is out to solve these problems. President Baxter 
is passing the money around to his friends. The treasurers take 
home full sacks every night and spend it recklessly. Every ef- 
fort is made to cut down contributions to the Fund Drive by 
circulating bad reports about the undergraduates and staging 
wild paities on fraternity lawns. 

Fund-distribution is especially hard on the college pres- 
ident. Baxter lives like a traveling salesman, circulating from 
Miami to Saratoga, Suffolk Downs, Hialeah, Jamaica, and Pim- 
lico. Last month he spent twenty-nine days at the race-tracks 
and managed to kxjse only $8,500. He hopes to give away another 
million during the summer, and reach the $2,5000,000 goal by 
1950. 

The businessman's logical move would be to cut the price 
. of tuition 50 per cent. The college could do this and still have 
plentv of students. But this would turn away the thing which 
Williams prizes most- a horde of rich and influential alumni. As 
it is, a Williams education is dirt cheap, and only a few stu- 
dents do not week-end in Bermuda and own at least one auto- 
mobile. The average student at Williams s]iends about seventy- 
five dollars a week. 

Far worse to contemplate than a cut in tuition is Baxter's 
other alternative, keeping the college as it is. Other colleges 
offer many educational advantages at half the price, though 
few can boast of the isolation and cold weather of northwestern 
.Ma.ssachusetts. But if Williams were moved to within 2.50 miles 
of civilization, it would become simply another great educational 
assembly-line and the problem of fund-distribution would dis- 
;ippear. Williams feels that such a step is not even worth con- 
sidering. Savs Phinnev Baxter ^rd, "It would be worse than death. 
Things have been this way since 1793. It's a tradition." 



Who are Williams Most 
Successful Youn g ' MenP 




Beaux MacNeedle '5? says 

"The secret of my success 
is preporatlon. I like conven 
ience which makes for sue 
cessful entertainment. There 
ain't no better preparatior: 
than o quick trip to Bostien' , 
for those necessary party sup 
plies." 

Mr. Bartender Automati( 
Jigger 

Swizsel Sticks 

College Seal Glass Wore 

Cocktail Shakers 

Bastien^s 



MOVING? 
call 

Mullen Bros., Inc. 

North Adams 890 






"'sm/'^ 





MARZANI 



MARKLE 



J. T. S. H. 



FAMOUS WILLIAMS MEN were these three imnortanf Americans: 
Carl A. Marzani '35, ex-president of the Garfield Club, Gargoyle 
and Phi Beta Kappa member as an undergraduate, later con- 
victed of concealing Communist Party membership while em- 
ployed by the State Department and the OSS; Carl Markle '49, 
Wallace supporter and winning Young Bepublican Club essay- 
ist and Josiah T. S. Horton '48, writer and columnist for the Wil- 
liams Record, Purple Cow, True Romances, and Space Comics. 



Loads or Port Leads 

48 States or Canada 

Packing - Crating - Sterogr 

THE WORLD MOVES 
SO DOES MULLEN 



Cubs - 



for the frosh team will he the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



NcSrwich aSra" a grouji or ' Dart- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor- 
win '52, Fernald, and Lippincott 
lost an exhibition four man can- 
oe race to the U. of Maine on Sun- 
day, but managed to even the 
score by winning a "canoe res- 
cue" exhibition race. 



arTnjr.cu 1 uri^cy jjj re uu 

Smoked Rainbow Trout 
Orange Slices in Spiced Brandy 
COUNTRY SHOP — North Street 



Party IQoersl 

HERE IS REAL NEWS 




(Our lee Cream) is amazingly rich in butter fat and 
Dextrose and yet Smooth and Delicious to the taste 

AVAILABLE IN BULK QUANTITIES 

(At meal tii^e) Bordens is truly a superior ice cream 
try it and convince yourself - • 

Borden Ice Cneam Co. 

North Adorns 2214 '^ Xw^ Deliver 



L G. BALFOUR CO. 



FRATERNITY JEWELRY 



Badges 

Jewelry 
StoHonery 
Club Pins 
Medols 



Rings 
Gifts 



Steins 
Favors 
Progroms 
Keys 
Trophies 



Write or Coll 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murroy Ave. Woterford, N. Y. 
Telephone Woterford 644 




BERKSHIRE OPTICAL COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



Courteous, efficient 

and prompt 

repair service 



Frank Provencher, Proprietor 
2nd Floor Kimbell BIdg. North Adam. 




DROP IN" AT 




INN" ;. 

On your way back from tennis 
for that long, cool refreshment 

REMEMBER! Informality is the rule 

In Shorts and Shirt s/eeves you are always welcome for a drink or a bite to eat. 



ily 

>lo 

I're 

re- 

,ier 

h: 

;ad 

in 

,ng. 

'll'S. 
M1(?S 
r:ilc 
k in 

WAS 

M(- 



acteristic. 

But he had been an office bo> 
Ihree monlhs when he was movi 
the copy research dcp.irtmcnt 
he could put his lilting for mark 
.search to work. Not long after, II 
was made manager of copy rest . 
at 28, only seven years after h' 
left Yale, he was vice-presidn 
charge of research and merchaiiil; 

By bearing down on market si m 
he helped boost the agency's bil 
from $46 million in 1946 to a i()4 
of more than $50 milhon. Last w 1 
Manhattan, at 32, Marion Harpn 
made president as Founder H. K 
Cann, 68, moved up to board 1 n lir- 
man. Said an awed agency direci' > in 
summarizing Harper's rise : "He ' ner- 
gizes people . . . he's got so mui !■ fn- 
ergy himself. The agency has m vet 
had such good teamwork before ' 

On Harper's team is his wife Vir- 
ginia, whom he met while she «;is a 
clerical worker at the agency and mar- 
ried in 1942. She is now assistani di- 
rector of McCann-Erickson's ™py 
research department. Having no chil- 
dren, Mr. & Mrs. Harper somelimM 
stay at the office until 2 a.m., working 
together. SiVys Mrs. Harper: "I think 
he's quite bright." 

Succatsful adman 
Harpar r»ad« tiMI 
•ach w«»k-as d* 
mora than 1,500,000 
olhar U.S. calla«* amduolu who 
And In TIME lh« news (k*y «">'' 
afford «o mla. 

To mtar your subscription M Tlis 
Wookly Newtmagoilna, U» «"y <■' 
TIMt'S RopraMntatlvn at Willi'"" 
Collogo . Barry Bonapo, Slgnia "<< 
'ratarnlty • Colloao Book Stero. 




1 ■ 




w^ 




♦7 



Price 10 cents 



ies Honors 
and Crown 



'.ribner Duo Downs 
I, Thurber In Finals 



uses 

riduct 

lit Lrud 
Ivisurs 

:d at the UC 
t that con- 
tlvities last 
be gentle- 
et He even 

milk-punch 
it the head 

likeness to 

,t such con- 
raging, and 
! 2 



Jight 
•Cow' 



itlcally call- 
sual run of 

)f whatever 
s^ection is 
jriginal hu- 



:';usic critic for the New York 

in , appeared In the Friday 

oming Issue of that paper. 

"What Robert Barrow's tenure 

director of the Williams Olee 

liib may be, I have no idea, but 

ic work the young men did in 

(iwn Hall last night suggests 

iU his option, If any, should be 

■riewed Indefinitely — at last, in 

ny case, till a larger number of 

he local alumni appear than were 

lesent for this program. Barrow 

ook the absent in his stride as he 

■lid the present in his confidence, 

inbally annotating the music be- 

i ore he conducted it. It made for 

■■' congenial as well as a rewarding 

^''iccasion. 

College glee clubs tend to run 
'0 types — as, for that matter, do 
Uie human materials of which 
See TOWN, Pare 2 



Samoiloff Collection 

On Display At AMT 

Throughout this week the 
Samolloff collection of scen- 
ery and costume designs is on 
display In the" shop of the AMT. 
Included In this collection are 
designs from Donald Oenslag- 
er's version of "Hamlet," Oli- 
ver Smith's sketches for "High 
Button Shoes" and many other 
items of Interest to theatre 
fans. The exhibition *111 con- 
clude Friday afternoon with a 
talk by the colWctdr herself, 
Carlene SambUoff. 



i-inyiiig uTTtyrg »■ uwp wMvy ^nvrnw 
the musicians in this area thrilled 
jazz lovers with an enthusiastic 
performance at the second annual 
WCA-sponsored "Jazz at Jesup" 
concert Saturday night. Of the 
four styles illustrated— swing, 
Nat "King" Cole, Dixieland, and 
bop — the Dixieland numbers fea- 
turing Associate Professor Roy 
Lamson on Clarinet easily stole 
the show. 

In fact his group was so widely 
applauded that they were called 
back for an encore by emcee Stan 
Pierce. "Jazz Me Blues" was their 
leadoff number followed by "No- 
body's Sweetheart Now" and the 
old Jazz favorite, "Muskrat Ram- 
ble." Besides Prof. Lamson on 
clarinet, instrumentalists in the 
Dixieland group Included Wally 
Olesen on trumpet. Neil Bolens on 
trombone, Norm Olson . at the 
piano. Bill Peyton playing banjo, 
and John Ferguson at the drums. 
Bop And Swing 

The Dixlelanders were followed 
by a bop group featuring Lenny 
Skold from New York on trumpet. 
Skold played a series of solos on 
one original number called "Mu- 
sic the Way It Should Be Played." 
This was sandwiched In between 
two bop standards, "Eeb Pob" and 
"Gabardine and Serge/' Other 
performers In this group were 
bassist John Marvin, tenorman 
Harry Lewis, pianist Bill Parting- 
ton, and drummer John DavU. 

A swing outfit made up mostly 
of Purple Knights' members took 
SM JAZZ, page 2,., 



New Issue Of COMMENT Features 
Fine Contributions By Underclassmc^n 



by P. Sheridan Collins 

The appearance of the third 
Issue of COMMENT Indicates that 
the "new" magazine Is firmly es- 
tablished and will maintain Its 
high artistic level, printing the 
only creative writing on the Wil- 
liams campus. 

The issue leans in the direction 
of fiction and poetry. The two ar- 
ticles are faculty contributions. 
Professor Burns draws several Im- 
portant conclusions from a clear 
and informative account of inter- 
service rivalries in the Pacific. 

If Professor Falson intends to 
do to writing what he accuses 
Americans of doing to art, he has 
succeeded admirably. Pleading for 
an Intellectual approach, he states' 
that "we are suckers for the cliche 
. . " yet the timely theme of "Any- 
body Can Paint - (It Says Here)" 
Is obscured by his atomic prose. 

This issue of COMMENT is for 
adults only. A parade of neuroses 
and psychoses gets ofl to a fast 
start with Joseph Dewey's Imagi- 
native and on the whole convinc- 
ing prdblngs of a schizophrenic 
mind In "Journey Without End". 

Albert Gumey and Donald 
Proeb, freshmen, have written 
short stories of exceptional pro- 
mise. Oumey's "The Verge", one 
of the most impressive pieces In 
the Issue, catches the quality of a 
boy's observation with 



great skill. Proeb's "Batista," cha- 
racter sketch of a Bermuda fish- 
erman, is sensitive and well-writ- 
ten. 

"The Shadowy Place," Robert 
Taylor's surrealist story of a man's 
arrival at an understanding of 
evil, contains the smoothest prose 
in the magazine. Characteriza- 
tions of Marco and the youth of 
the speaker's conscience are es- 
pecially fine. 

Outstanding poetical work Is 
Russell Bourne's "The Case of the 
Anglicized Whimper." He has suc- 
cessfully caught the heavy sar- 
casm of T. S. Eliot's style in a fine 
satire on middlebrow culture. 
Two contributions by Kevin Mo- 
ran show good poetic sense and 
skill in the use of words to de- 
velop emotional tone. "Twilight 
and White Walls," however, seems 
to pay too much attention to the 
basic Image, and too little to the 
concrete from which it arises. 

Peter Andrews has written two 
poems in a romantic mood. "Sep- 
tember Wind" Is concise and care- 
fully handled, adding an enjoy- 
able twist to orthodox poetic 
treatment of the seasons. 

The level of the art work re- 
mains high throughout John Hop- 
kins, William Tuttle. and John 
Field have all made highly suc- 
cessful contributions In a variety 
of styles. ■ , 



ns. Notable 
a from RPI 
it romantic 
,Nash. This 
givTTB iiic euiiors a uiiance to refer 
to the "Pup" as 'Ipleasantly Fil- 
thy" and a thoroughly entertain- 
ing magazine. Unfortunately the 
piece picked to show the merits of 
the Yale "Record" is not of such 
stuff as to allow the editors to 
make a simlliar comment. A fun- 
See CARTOON, Page 2 



Premeds Hear 
Harvard 



by Pete Piclcard 

nslon in the Sage courts gallery Sunday aft- 

Igland doubles finals began, for It was an all- 
defending champs Fred Scribner and Charlie 

jbinson and Pete Thurber. The battle was even 
sets; then the favorites turned on the steam 

7, 6-3, 6-2. 

■■ <J Billy Smith of Amherst copped 

the singles title as he downed 
Wesleyan's catlike Salaun in four 
patball sets. Ray of Yale had been 
favored to win, but the Yalles 
were forced to pull up stakes Sat- 
urday morning and head home for 
a dual meet with Cornell This 
left the way clear for Williams to 
snare the meet with IJj points, 
while Amherst and Wesleyan took 
second and third with 1 and )j. 
Doubles Teams Potent 
Scribner and Schaaf breezed 
through their first three matches 
with the loss of only eleven games 
but in the sei^ifinals they ran in 
to a determined pair from Spring- 
field that fought stubbornly be- 
fore yeilding 12-10. 7-5. Both Sp- 
ringfield men had strong services 
and overheads, while Taylor, 
whom the Ephs concentrated on 
as the weak sister, repeatedly 
came up with uncanny gets. Su- 
perior volleying eventually pro- 
ved the margin of victory for the 
home team. 

Robinson and Thurber struggl- 
ed through the stiffest fight uf 
the tournament in the quarter- 
finals against Monsalvatge and 
Miller of MIT. Monsalvatge's de- 
cisive shots frequently scored 
placements, but the mighty mites 
were invincibly steady In the fi- 
nal games and won 6-3, 6-8. 7-5. 
They were again hard pressed in 
the semi-finals by Amherst's Sm- 
ith-Greene duo, which twice for-" 
ced them into extra games be- 
fore bowing 8-6. 7-5 

Treman Scares Salaun 
Scribner and Schaaf both rea- 
ched the singles quarterfinals, 
while Robinson advanced to the 
semis. Bud Treman was knocked 
out in the first round by Salaun, 
but not until he had given the 
second seeded player a healthy 
scare and come close to providing 
the major upset of the tourna- 
ment. Stroking carefully. Treman 
kept the ball deep on his oppo- 
nent's backhand and won the first 
set 6-4. After dropping the next 
one 6-3, he built up a 3-1 lead in 
the nightcap, but Salaun began to 
break through to the net and ran 
off five straight games to take the 
match. 

Robinson eased up against No- 
rris of Yale in the quarters and 
was forced into three sets. This 

rj /• tired him somewhat for his semi- 

±rOT» final meeting with Salaun, which 
•^ See TENNIS. Page 2 



al, but most 
al is funny 
iflous taste. 
little piece 
the issue" 
quaint and 
! sketch de- 
e of life at 



Dr Jones Tells Pros, 
Cons Of Medicine 



.•^a, 



.'''vv,v4.:'«Sij2 



• :VLi..^i; . 



Dr. Lester Jones, Williams '13, 
of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital and Harvard Medical 
School spoke on the , pro's and 
con's of the medical profession as 
a career In a lecture given at the 
Theta Delta Chi house on Monday 
night. 

Dr. Jones began his lecture by 
giving the main reasons that 
young men have for going to med- 
ical school. First, many go to med- 
ical school because it Is part of a 
family tradition to do so. Others 
want to be doctors because of an 
interest In human beings and a 
desire to help people. Thirdly, 
many men choose medicine as a 
career because they are scienti- 
fically minded and because they 
see the many manifestations of 
science in medicine. Unfor- 
See JONES, Page 4 

IV... ■ .-.,.,*' V . .. ._:. 
''■:-.-■:■■ ■■:■."":■. ;'--;-4:/. 



woe To Sponsor 
Picnic For Faculty 

Greylock Excursion Set 
For Sunday Aftermton 



Members oi: the Williams Out- 
ing Club will Join the faculty for 
a picnic on Mt.»Oreylock on Sun- 
day. 

Meeting at 11 a.m., the group 
will entertain itself bf playing 
Softball and competing in some 
of the events of "woods" skill 
which WOC' members participated 
In at the May 16 Dartmouth 
Woodsmen's Weekend. 

A lunch featuring hambutigers 
as its main dish will provide the 
group with a resting period be- 
fore the Winning of a scavenger 
hunt scheduled for the attemoon. 
See woe, Page 9 






fir^W^r^- 





ntered as second-class matter November 27, 19' 
NortnNAdbms, Massachusetts, under the Act of MoL 
Miller, bqmb ond Hunter, Inc., North Adams, / 
WednesdayNmd Saturday durit^g the college year, 
per year. Record. Office, Jesup Hall, Willlamstown, 

Richards J. Heuer, JrX/SO <Phone: 883-M or 113 

Herbert D. Mohring '5ff 

Norman S. ,Wood '50 

Philip S. Collins '50 IPhoneN^81-M or 33 

Lansing G. Scofield '50 

Walter P. Stern '50 

William R. Barney '49 

Associate Editors: 1950- H. Baker, Sx^Bloschke; K. f 

Editorial Staff: 1951- E. Jones, B. Pen 

1952- R. Duffield, G. Kinter, W. 

Widing. 
Staff Photographer 



John S. Prescott, Jr. '50 

Edward L. Stockhouse '50 

Horry Frazier, III '51 

Douglas D. Garfield '50 A 

Barry Benepe A 

John Lund 

W. Robert Mill '51 




Business Stoff: 1950- B. Benepe, J. Comfort, P. 
W. Riegol, J. K. Whitney. 1951- P. Avery, C 
R. Moil, H. Voorhis. 1952- A. Bell, D. Bickf< 
S. Humes, C. Nason, E. Sikorovski, W. Smith, 



X 



-How P^^" . Z\^..^.^,k 






e 



Volume LXIII 



MAY 11, 1948 



TYPING DONE 

Mrs. Barbara Thompson 
Simonds Road 
Telephone 200 



NEED A TUX? 

WE HAVE TUXEDOS FOR RENT 
ANY SIZE 

SABINS 

Cor. Holden & Center Sts. 
North Adorns 



Nine 



Iconic 



WEDNESDAY 
UNDER THE RED ROBE 

Feature: 7:00 - 9:00 

THURSDAY 
German Dialogue - English Titles 

RAZZIA 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 

FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Ray Millcnd Audrey Totter 

ALIAS NICK BEAU 

Feature: 6:40 - 8:45 



The HlUto 
assault by 
during the 
venth innini 
nal run in ^ 
single by I{ 
other singlei 
duced the i 
In the slxO 
Purple offeni 
as twelve m 
to go with t 
ballplayers ( 

This after 
meet a po? 
Nine on Wes 
who are lea 
have lost on 
Last year th 
pie and Geo 
count. Dltnu 
Bob Olsson I 
ers In what 
Ephmen's tfl 
the year. 
Williams Unl 




NORTHERN BERKSHIRE GAS COMPANY 

rART Of NEW INGIAND ilECTKIC SYSTEM 



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AFTER THE FLICKS, IT'S 

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TO EAT IS THE 

RICHMOND 
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Bush, 2b i 
Mierzejewskfl 
Healy, ss 
DeLlsser, 3b 
Owen, rf 
Fisljer, If ., 
Tone 
Lynch 
Mason, R 
Cool, lb 
Mason, Ray 
Zeller, c ' 
Manning 
Sutton, p 
Lanes, p 
Ditmar 
Ray, p 

Totals ;.) 



NO cock-of-the-walk was poor, sad, seedy Sheedy when he 
found loose dandruff on his comb. Now that he's a Wildrooter, 
he has something ta crow about and so will you. Wiidroot 
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really have to scratch to find it! Peck on down to your favorite 
drug counter and bring back a hen full of non-alcoholic 
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— Wiidroot Cream-Oil is again and again the choice of men 
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'BETTER TRY SANITONE-IT'S THE 
BEST DRY CLEANING IN TOWN" 

Even our most exaaing customers .praise SANITONE — 
(hey call it the best dry cleaning io town. They like the way 
it goes to work on hard-to-clean garments; takes out more 
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cleaning odor either with this really scientific dry cleaning 
method. Bring in your garments today — you'll give top 
honors to SANITONE, too. 



GEORGE RUDNICK, INC. 



FOR A BETTER KIND OF DRY CLEANING 




Trinity 
Williams 



000 101 000 2 



8 3 

For Trinity: Heppenstall and 
Kunklewioz, For Williams: Sut- 
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ning. 



Cubs 



f6r the frosh team will be the 
Little Three meet, which will be 
held here on May 17. Amherst is 
sending one of the finest fresh- 
man teams they have ever had, 
and Wesleyan also appears to be 
strong. 



NAhvlcn and a group of Dart- 
mouth alumni. 

Donald Gregory '50, Roger Cor-' 
win '52, Pemald, and Llppincott 
los